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Old 10-01-2017, 11:40 PM   #41
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Note that sodium bicarbonate should not be added to sparge water, only to the mash

hi ss
thanks again for a great post
could you please clarify if the rule above only applies to sodium bicarbonate and that all other treatment's can be added to both mash and sparge waters
cheers clarke
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Old 11-01-2017, 12:45 AM   #42
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Note that sodium bicarbonate should not be added to sparge water, only to the mash

hi ss
thanks again for a great post
could you please clarify if the rule above only applies to sodium bicarbonate and that all other treatment's can be added to both mash and sparge waters
cheers clarke
Yes that only applies to sodium bicarbonate, other treatments should be added to both mash and sparge water.
The reason sodium bicarbonate shouldn't be added to sparge water is because tannins can be extracted from the grains if the pH is too high, so the sparge water should never have its alkalinity increased.
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Old 11-01-2017, 07:26 AM   #43
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Yes that only applies to sodium bicarbonate, other treatments should be added to both mash and sparge water.
The reason sodium bicarbonate shouldn't be added to sparge water is because tannins can be extracted from the grains if the pH is too high, so the sparge water should never have its alkalinity increased.
Great stuff .very helpful
Thanks again
Clarke

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Old 12-01-2017, 01:26 PM   #44
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Hi strange Steve
Me again sorry to b a pain in the arse but if you could answer a couple more questions it would be much appreciated
When adding gypsum or calcium chloride to increase the calcium do you always us a mix of them both (more % gypsum to chloride for hoppy beer and more % chloride to gypsum for maltier beers) or can you use just one for the respective beer type.
Also do you put your calcium chloride into the HLT and dissolve (as I have seen done ont Internet) as on my tub it says add to the grist
Thanks again Clarke

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Old 12-01-2017, 01:33 PM   #45
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I'd keep it simple, so if you're doing a hoppy beer use gypsum only and for a malty beer use calcium chloride only, but only up to its maximum of 0.25g/L. If you need to add more calcium then make up the difference with gypsum.
I always add the salts to the water in the HLT to make sure it's properly mixed.
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Old 13-01-2017, 12:40 PM   #46
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A great post ss,just got my readings from our water company

Sulphate 84.9mg
Chloride 39.5 mg
Alkaline 139.6 mg
Hardness/Calcium 55.9 mg
Chloride 39.5 mg
Magnesium 0.76
Sodium 27.5
PH 7.45
Aluminium 6.04
Iron 10.27
Nitrate 14.34

I only brew IPA and I use a single carbon filter to fill the kettle
Any suggestions would be appreciated

Looking at John Palmers book these readings are all at the lower end of his range.

Last edited by BREWERS DROOP; 13-01-2017 at 01:30 PM. Reason: Additional info
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Old 13-01-2017, 01:15 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by strange-steve View Post
Yes that only applies to sodium bicarbonate, other treatments should be added to both mash and sparge water.
The reason sodium bicarbonate shouldn't be added to sparge water is because tannins can be extracted from the grains if the pH is too high, so the sparge water should never have its alkalinity increased.
Great stuff .very helpful
Thanks again
Clarke

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Originally Posted by strange-steve View Post
I'd keep it simple, so if you're doing a hoppy beer use gypsum only and for a malty beer use calcium chloride only, but only up to its maximum of 0.25g/L. If you need to add more calcium then make up the difference with gypsum.
I always add the salts to the water in the HLT to make sure it's properly mixed.
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Old 13-01-2017, 01:35 PM   #48
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A great post ss,just got my readings from our water company

Sulphate 84.9mg
Chloride 39.5 mg
Alkaline 139.6 mg
Hardness/Calcium 55.9 mg

I only brew IPA and I use a single carbon filter to fill the kettle
Any suggestions would be appreciated

Looking at John Palmers book these readings are all at the lower end of his range.
Well the first thing is chlorine removal. You say you use a carbon filter which is good for chlorine removal, however it's not very efficient at removing chloramine which is just as problematic. I'd recommend saving yourself some time by skipping the filtration and using campden tablets instead. They're cheap as chips and very effective.

Next you want to lower your alkalinity. As it is, it's fine for stouts and porters but a bit too high for an IPA. You'd ideally want to lower the alkalinity to around 20-30 ppm which means removing 110-120 ppm. To do this add either 0.22ml/L of lactic acid or 0.6ml/L of CRS.

Thirdly, increase your calcium to around 100 ppm. Because you brew IPAs, stick to gypsum to make the hops shine. Around 0.2g/L of gypsum will add about 46 ppm of calcium bringing your total over 100 ppm.

Job done. That'll give you a decent IPA water profile that should make a noticeable difference.
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Old 13-01-2017, 06:14 PM   #49
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Well the first thing is chlorine removal. You say you use a carbon filter which is good for chlorine removal, however it's not very efficient at removing chloramine which is just as problematic. I'd recommend saving yourself some time by skipping the filtration and using campden tablets instead. They're cheap as chips and very effective.

Next you want to lower your alkalinity. As it is, it's fine for stouts and porters but a bit too high for an IPA. You'd ideally want to lower the alkalinity to around 20-30 ppm which means removing 110-120 ppm. To do this add either 0.22ml/L of lactic acid or 0.6ml/L of CRS.

Thirdly, increase your calcium to around 100 ppm. Because you brew IPAs, stick to gypsum to make the hops shine. Around 0.2g/L of gypsum will add about 46 ppm of calcium bringing your total over 100 ppm.

Job done. That'll give you a decent IPA water profile that should make a noticeable difference.
Absolutely fantastic,thanks ss
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Old 13-01-2017, 07:34 PM   #50
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Absolutely fantastic,thanks ss
What impact on the ph will it have on adding lactic acid,or is it something that will rectify itself during the mash.Or is it added to the hlt
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