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Old 20-01-2015, 02:45 PM   #11
MyQul
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Why would the Safale US-05 make it more like a porter?
I also have this kit waiting in the wings and I do like a Porter.

I would say It's the grains that make a porter rather than the yeast in a similar way that hops make various IPA's

You can brew porters with various yeast's, whaterver yeast you like really, Baltic porter is even brewed with lager yeast
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Old 21-01-2015, 03:55 PM   #12
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Default Brewferm Oud Vlaams Bruin/Old Brown Beer

@ MyQul

With respect, I quote someone who knows more than I

"Yeast is one of the most important components of a beer recipe. If you think about it, you do not make beer, you simply provide a friendly environment for yeast to make the beer for you.

Different strains of yeast have evolved over the history of brewing, adapting to their breweries and being selected for different characteristics by brewers. The strain of yeast you choose can profoundly affect the balance of the beer just by virtue of the mix of alcohols and esters that they produce.

Every strain is different, but speaking in broad generalizations and bearing in mind that the flavors described can be subtle:

Belgian yeasts emphasize "spicy" esters. (E.g. White Labs 550 Belgian Ale)
English yeasts emphasize "fruity" esters. (E.g. Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley)
German yeasts tend to emphasize the malt. (E.g. White Labs 830 German Lager)
American yeasts tend to have a "clean" character that emphasizes hop flavor. (E.g Wyeast 1056 American Ale)"
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Fermenting: Brewferm Oud Vlaams Bruin/Old Brown Beer
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Old 21-01-2015, 05:17 PM   #13
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@ myqul

with respect, i quote someone who knows more than i

"yeast is one of the most important components of a beer recipe. If you think about it, you do not make beer, you simply provide a friendly environment for yeast to make the beer for you.

Different strains of yeast have evolved over the history of brewing, adapting to their breweries and being selected for different characteristics by brewers. The strain of yeast you choose can profoundly affect the balance of the beer just by virtue of the mix of alcohols and esters that they produce.

Every strain is different, but speaking in broad generalizations and bearing in mind that the flavors described can be subtle:

Belgian yeasts emphasize "spicy" esters. (e.g. White labs 550 belgian ale)
english yeasts emphasize "fruity" esters. (e.g. Wyeast 1275 thames valley)
german yeasts tend to emphasize the malt. (e.g. White labs 830 german lager)
american yeasts tend to have a "clean" character that emphasizes hop flavor. (e.g wyeast 1056 american ale)"
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Old 01-02-2015, 02:22 PM   #14
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This is my favourite Brewferm Belgian kit, absolutely love it: think I made it to recipe but with a tin of treacle instead of sugar. Was ready to drink within a few months, but this is the first time I've ever managed to keep a few bottles back a whole year and boy is it good - finished at 6.5% ABV

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Old 01-02-2015, 02:45 PM   #15
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@ burgo. Sorry for the rather late reply on this

I whole heartedly agree. As someone once said, brewers make wort and yeast make beer.

I think what proost was a asking was, is there a specific yeast that creates a porter. I would say no. Porter is a malt forward beer. Without the roasted malts, chocolate, brown, black, etc you wouldn't be able to make a porter to get the distinctive porter flavours such as coffee and chocolate.

You can then use the yeast to further manipulate flavourto say add some spicy esters or fruity ones.

But as quoted no yeast, no beer

I am of course speaking specifically about porter as I am aware that some styles get their particular flavour almost exclusively from the yeast - I'm thinking of some of the belgian and french beers here
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Old 01-02-2015, 04:47 PM   #16
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@ burgo. Sorry for the rather late reply on this

I whole heartedly agree. As someone once said, brewers make wort and yeast make beer.

I think what proost was a asking was, is there a specific yeast that creates a porter. I would say no. Porter is a malt forward beer. Without the roasted malts, chocolate, brown, black, etc you wouldn't be able to make a porter to get the distinctive porter flavours such as coffee and chocolate.

You can then use the yeast to further manipulate flavourto say add some spicy esters or fruity ones.

But as quoted no yeast, no beer

I am of course speaking specifically about porter as I am aware that some styles get their particular flavour almost exclusively from the yeast - I'm thinking of some of the belgian and french beers here
Yes I was asking that. Porter is my favourite style of beer and I was just hoping that there was an easy way to brew it. I have been brewing for a year now, only kits mainly Coopers and Wilkos. Now that I have the basic brewing knowledge, I want to experiment with kits to change the taste profile. May think about AG in the future.

Thanks for all the replies

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Old 15-05-2015, 08:19 PM   #17
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This is my favourite Brewferm Belgian kit, absolutely love it: think I made it to recipe but with a tin of treacle instead of sugar. Was ready to drink within a few months, but this is the first time I've ever managed to keep a few bottles back a whole year and boy is it good - finished at 6.5% ABV

How on earth did you manage to avoid drinking it for a year Darrell ?

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Old 30-03-2016, 08:41 AM   #18
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Started this yesterday using a 900g tin of golden syrup and approx 200g of demerara sugar I had left over. Made up to 15 litres, og came in at 1064, I reckon I'm going to leave it alone for a courple of weeks and go from there. I'll bottle this for my Christmas supply alongside the abjdi I made last autum.
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Old 18-04-2016, 12:04 PM   #19
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Little update, bottled my brew yesterday. Fg came in at 1010, spot on the brewferm guide which I was happy about. I'd left it alone in the fv for 3 weeks so was relieved that it had brewed out ok. Managed to fill 27 PET bottles primed with a teaspoon of brewing sugar and have stashed them away with the Abjdi I made last September. This years Christmas beer supply is stacking up nicely, fancy doing a diablo double batch to go with them next.
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Old 05-09-2017, 04:28 PM   #20
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I've just brewed this for the 4th time, I really love this kit. Just add a 907g tin of Lyle Golden Syrup and a big tablespoon from another jar to give you OG 1060 for 12L.

All the Brewferm kits are great but this one, for me, is the best.
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