Register Now!
The HomeBrew Forum > Beer Brewing Talk > General Beer Discussion > All Grain Brewing for an Absolute Beginner?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 19-06-2017, 02:09 PM   #1
Hilly_2017
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default All Grain Brewing for an Absolute Beginner?

Afternoon everyone!

Let me start by saying that I've never done any sort of home brewing before, but of course I'm an avid beer fan! Having said that, I have watched plenty of YouTube videos over the past month or two about how to get started in home brewing.

All of which suggest that if I want to try and clone some of the types of beer I like e.g. Brewdog Dead Pony Club / Hop Fiction, Beavertown Gamma Ray etc... then it's obvious that I need to look at All Grain brewing.

My worry is that having looked around various sites, everyone seems to start out doing Extract brewing, and then work their way up to All Grain brewing.

My question is..... am I stupid to contemplate starting with All Grain brewing, or shall I begin with Extract brewing?

My local bottle shop (Hop & Grape, Darlington - https://www.hopandgrape.co.uk/) do some decent All Grain brewing setups for beginners and I'd like to think that I've watched enough brew day for beginners videos to try and muddle along, but I can't help but feel that I'm underestimating things!
Hilly_2017 is offline  
ElvisIsBeer Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 02:18 PM   #2
IainM
Senior Member
 
IainM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 1,434
Liked 630 Times on 451 Posts
Likes Given: 282

Default

It isn't stupid, but I would recommend starting with a couple of kits first, to get a feel for it and get some practice with the basics of sanitation, temperature control, bottling and so on. Kits are quick, not too expensive and give decent results. Then you can upgrade to all grain later by buying the additional bits. For the beers you mentioned, the kits for Youngs American IPA, Festival Razorback IPA, and Tiny Rebel Cwtch sound like they would be up your street.

EDIT: Welcome to the forum by the way!
__________________
Planning: nothing
FVs: nothing
DJs: nothing
Conditioning: Black IPA v3, TC, 007:Golden Hop / Amarillo IPA, Experimental Grapefruit single hop, John Bull IPA partial mash
Drinking: Gales Festival Mild (GW clone), RIS, Honey Cider, Winebuddy Merlot, Mead, Cyser, Melomel
Previous good'uns: RyeIPA, NEDIPA, Bitter (HBF comp 2nd place), Perry from scratch, Hobgob clone, DIYDog Dogma, Mild, BIPA x 2, ginger beer
IainM is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 02:34 PM   #3
Sadfield
Senior Member
 
Sadfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Macclesfield
Posts: 384
Liked 183 Times on 114 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Go for it. It's how I started. Do a single malt and single hop variety pale ale to start. It really isn't difficult just more time consuming. Anything you'll learn doing kits, you'll learn doing all grain. If your aim is all grain, buying kits eats away at your AG equipment budget.

Whether kits or all grain, the easiest way to fail is poor sanitation and messing about with it when it is fermenting. Read up about oxy cleaner and starsan, leave your lid on the fv for 2 weeks, and you won't go far wrong.

Remember, there is always someone here to help if need be.




Sent from my C5303 using Tapatalk
__________________
http://www.macchomebrew.club
Sadfield is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 02:38 PM   #4
Hilly_2017
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IainM View Post
It isn't stupid, but I would recommend starting with a couple of kits first, to get a feel for it and get some practice with the basics of sanitation, temperature control, bottling and so on. Kits are quick, not too expensive and give decent results. Then you can upgrade to all grain later by buying the additional bits. For the beers you mentioned, the kits for Youngs American IPA, Festival Razorback IPA, and Tiny Rebel Cwtch sound like they would be up your street.

EDIT: Welcome to the forum by the way!

Thanks Iain!

I guess I was worried that by starting out with a few kits I might get a sub-standard product, and therefore I might as well save my money and buy a proper All Grain kit.

But looking at the list you've given, it seems there are plenty of decent kits floating about. I'm a fan of 'fruity / hoppy' West Coast APA's so I think I'll do as you suggest and pick up an extract kit.

Which out of those 3 would you recommend the most?
Hilly_2017 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 02:42 PM   #5
IainM
Senior Member
 
IainM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 1,434
Liked 630 Times on 451 Posts
Likes Given: 282

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilly_2017 View Post
Thanks Iain!

I guess I was worried that by starting out with a few kits I might get a sub-standard product, and therefore I might as well save my money and buy a proper All Grain kit.

But looking at the list you've given, it seems there are plenty of decent kits floating about. I'm a fan of 'fruity / hoppy' West Coast APA's so I think I'll do as you suggest and pick up an extract kit.

Which out of those 3 would you recommend the most?
I only tried the Youngs one before moving to all grain, but the other two get rave reviews and are similar in style. I don't think you can go wrong with any of them. There is a list of review threads here, which might help you decide.
__________________
Planning: nothing
FVs: nothing
DJs: nothing
Conditioning: Black IPA v3, TC, 007:Golden Hop / Amarillo IPA, Experimental Grapefruit single hop, John Bull IPA partial mash
Drinking: Gales Festival Mild (GW clone), RIS, Honey Cider, Winebuddy Merlot, Mead, Cyser, Melomel
Previous good'uns: RyeIPA, NEDIPA, Bitter (HBF comp 2nd place), Perry from scratch, Hobgob clone, DIYDog Dogma, Mild, BIPA x 2, ginger beer
IainM is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 02:44 PM   #6
Aristotle
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Manchester
Posts: 5
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I would agree with Sadfield that you may as well start with AG. I did one kit before I went to AG, and I don't think I learnt a great deal from it. There's no substitute for learning from doing the real thing.

Also, the kit I used was Young's American IPA. The beer was pretty terrible if I'm honest, and I think the main culprit was the yeast included in the kit. If you do go down the kit road, I would make sure the yeast is good, or buy yeast separately. A pack of Safale us-05 is cheap, and would do the job.
Aristotle is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 05:15 PM   #7
MyQul
Chairman of the Bored
THBF_MODERATOR.png
 
MyQul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Royal Hamlet of Peckham. London.
Posts: 11,974
Liked 3749 Times on 2880 Posts
Likes Given: 3910

Default

If your keen on trying to clone your favourite beers I'd say go for it and start out all grain. I dont think there's anything you going to learn doing a kit you wont pick up quite quickly doing AG.
However I would suggest starting simple and starting small. This thread has help many cross over to AG. It's a lot simpler than you might think

http://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/sh...ad.php?t=51779
__________________
Orfys Mild
Centennial American Brown
Sam Adams Boston Lager
Milk Mild/Stout
Strong (6%) Stout/Porter









MyQul is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 06:14 PM   #8
m_rawdin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 119
Liked 19 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

The good thing going about all grain brewing now is there is so much help, advice and I formation out there. There are videos on YouTube, a few must have books, forums like this, websites with recipes etc. It could be worth starting with brew in a bag then moving on from there. I was lucky in that I know someone who is a home brewer who taught me how to use a 3 vessel system. A few months ago I moved onto an all in one system which is fantastic, but expensive.
m_rawdin is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 07:54 PM   #9
Byron
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 42
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I always knew AG was where I'd end up but was nervous about the investment in kit and messing something up with all the variables.

So I did 1 kit, then 1 extract and I've been AG all the way ever since. Every now and again I get a kit as a present as people know I homebrew and they're always a nice break from the length of time an AG takes up.
__________________
Give a man a beer and he wastes an hour. But teach him how to brew and he wastes a lifetime.
Byron is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 19-06-2017, 08:08 PM   #10
Gerryjo
Senior Member
 
Gerryjo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Derry,Northern Ireland
Posts: 1,436
Liked 464 Times on 386 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilly_2017 View Post
Afternoon everyone!

Let me start by saying that I've never done any sort of home brewing before, but of course I'm an avid beer fan! Having said that, I have watched plenty of YouTube videos over the past month or two about how to get started in home brewing.

All of which suggest that if I want to try and clone some of the types of beer I like e.g. Brewdog Dead Pony Club / Hop Fiction, Beavertown Gamma Ray etc... then it's obvious that I need to look at All Grain brewing.

My worry is that having looked around various sites, everyone seems to start out doing Extract brewing, and then work their way up to All Grain brewing.

My question is..... am I stupid to contemplate starting with All Grain brewing, or shall I begin with Extract brewing?

My local bottle shop (Hop & Grape, Darlington - https://www.hopandgrape.co.uk/) do some decent All Grain brewing setups for beginners and I'd like to think that I've watched enough brew day for beginners videos to try and muddle along, but I can't help but feel that I'm underestimating things!
Honestly if you're up for it then go for it.I started back into homebrewing after away for over 20 years but went staright to an all grain stove top kit and I have not looked back.
Any questions I need answering I just ask these very kind folk on the forum who are always more than willing to help.
So it's down to yourself,though I would do a few small batches on the stove to get yourself going and it's minmal equipment need.
Gerryjo is offline  
Hilly_2017 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Absolute beginner in home brewing, wondering about temperature? 09harsma General Beer Brewing Discussion 11 29-10-2014 09:42 PM
Absolute beginner here pelipar Beer Brewdays! 14 17-10-2014 09:34 AM
Absolute beginner! GazzaWazza Introduce Yourself 6 08-12-2013 10:48 AM
Absolute beginner!... Scotty Introduce Yourself 5 19-09-2013 09:57 PM
Absolute beginner moose Introduce Yourself 15 21-01-2013 06:55 PM

Newest Threads