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Old 19-06-2017, 08:11 PM   #11
ElvisIsBeer
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Time is the big factor for me....I'll deffo go AG, but I appreciate the kits because time is short now.

Hop & Grape - nice people. Happy to chat.
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Old 19-06-2017, 08:29 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I always knew AG was where I'd end up but was nervous about the investment in kit and messing something up with all the variables.

So I did 1 kit, then 1 extract and I've been AG all the way ever since. Every now and again I get a kit as a present as people know I homebrew and they're always a nice break from the length of time an AG takes up.
+1 on time saving and they are handy on time👍

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Old 20-06-2017, 12:06 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the advice guys. Really appreciate it.

The goal is obviously to be able to brew my own stuff which can hold a candle to the type of beers I currently buy off the shelf without the hefty price tag.

I like the idea of having a go at a simple all grain brew day though. Looking at clibit's post, I didn't realise how simple it could really be! I thought to even attempt All Grain brewing, I'd have to fork out �£200+ for an All Grain starter kit.

I haven't read all the thread just yet but looking at it - I could potentially brew something with less than �£20's worth of kit.

In theory could I use the DIY Dog pdf alongside Beersmith and calculate the quantity needed to produce a 10 litre stove top version of my favourite beers?
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Old 20-06-2017, 12:24 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Hilly_2017 View Post
Thanks for all the advice guys. Really appreciate it.

The goal is obviously to be able to brew my own stuff which can hold a candle to the type of beers I currently buy off the shelf without the hefty price tag.

I like the idea of having a go at a simple all grain brew day though. Looking at clibit's post, I didn't realise how simple it could really be! I thought to even attempt All Grain brewing, I'd have to fork out �£200+ for an All Grain starter kit.

I haven't read all the thread just yet but looking at it - I could potentially brew something with less than �£20's worth of kit.

In theory could I use the DIY Dog pdf alongside Beersmith and calculate the quantity needed to produce a 10 litre stove top version of my favourite beers?
It seems daunting at the start but when you get started the process gets easier.
Keep good notes/documentation right from the start in a big book or create a checklist once your established.
Note water, equipment, temperature of water,room,grains.
Try and calibrate your equipment from size, type and the most critical thing is sanitisation after your boil has completed but these will come through like OCD after a while.
You'll be amazed at the different ways people brew and can still achieve amazing results.

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Old 20-06-2017, 01:23 PM   #15
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My question is..... am I stupid to contemplate starting with All Grain brewing, or shall I begin with Extract brewing?
Extract or kits (tailored extract) are a great entry point as you need little more than a big bucket and some bottles so nothing wrong at all with trying a quick kit now while you figure out exactly what you want/need in regards to equipment.

Simple BIAB will make you a great beer time after time so moving into all grain doesn't have to be expensive at all though it will be quite a bit more time consuming meaning you can be limited to making a brew on days of.
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Old 20-06-2017, 01:39 PM   #16
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A lot of us mix and match with AG, Partial Mash and Extract Kits depending on what we wish to brew and time available, so starting AG definitely isn't stupid.

However, screwing up an AG brew that took hours of work to prepare and produce can be very disheartening so I would personally recommend starting with a few cheap kits (which require the minimum of equipment and take only minutes to prepare) and cut your teeth on them before moving on to AG.

That way you will get used to waiting patiently for the yeast to do its work, waiting patiently for the carbonation to occur and waiting patiently for the beer to condition and become palatable.

Did you notice the "waiting patiently" bit? It's one of the hardest things to do so starting out with a few kits will get you into the swing of things and if you screw up a brew it won't have cost you a lot of time and effort.

Enjoy!
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AG Mild Ale (02/03/17)
Coopers Stout Kit + Grain (15/06/17)
SMASH with Maris Otter & Saaz (24/08/17)

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Pale Ale with EKG & Saaz
Wilco's Hoppy Copper Bitter
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Old 20-06-2017, 03:35 PM   #17
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Oh @Dutto you forgot to mention.....


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Old 20-06-2017, 04:10 PM   #18
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Wish I'd have discovered Clibit's thread sooner.

If I had to do it over I'd buy one of those Coopers bitter kits and then move to AG ASAP. Stove tops are a great way to get started (it was my first AG) but it can get smelly and it's just as easy to do 20L as it is to do 5L. Smaller batches is just a matter of scaling down.

If funds are really tight you can DIY a boiler out of one of those 20L brewing buckets for about �£25 (have a google) and go the no chill method and if your tight in space then do a Brew in a Bag method. Dedicated boilers start at around �£50.

Welcome to the dark side.
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Old 20-06-2017, 04:26 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by GlentoranMark View Post
Wish I'd have discovered Clibit's thread sooner.

If I had to do it over I'd buy one of those Coopers bitter kits and then move to AG ASAP. Stove tops are a great way to get started (it was my first AG) but it can get smelly and it's just as easy to do 20L as it is to do 5L. Smaller batches is just a matter of scaling down.

If funds are really tight you can DIY a boiler out of one of those 20L brewing buckets for about �£25 (have a google) and go the no chill method and if your tight in space then do a Brew in a Bag method. Dedicated boilers start at around �£50.

Welcome to the dark side.
30 litre Burco cygnet for £78 delivered but my heads up my @##_ at the moment as I've so much going on and can't get room in the garage to get my kit set up.
Good thing about the boilers/urns is you can do Boil/strike water/mash or BIAB.I just think they can be so versatile and easily sorted for your needs.It was a birthday present for me and that's my excuse....

Gerry
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Old 20-06-2017, 06:02 PM   #20
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I've done 3 AG now (BIAB).
1st two stove top then bought a Peco boiler and have done 1 in that.
I wish I'd have done this years ago. My brews are simple at the moment as I'm learning and I get desire to brew every other day !! If only I had the time.
Results have been awesome - heads above the kits I'd done before.

Go for it as you say. Stove top 10l jobs really won't cost you a lot and YOU WILL be hooked !


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