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Old 07-04-2017, 08:00 PM   #1
BeerisGOD
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Default Wheelers CAMRA how to..

Brew beer is on its way to me. Plenty of recepies by sounds of it.
I couldn't help look at a very small amount of negative reviews about not giving you advise on the best yeast for each beer.
Thankfully the mangrove jack's site gives great descriptions of they're yeasts so I was considering matching up.
Does anyone else have a problem knowing which yeast to choose?
I've mostly used gervin (Nottingham) but I'm now looking for a different path to make sure I'm getting the best flavours from my brews.

Cheers
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:05 PM   #2
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I have that book too it's great. I'd also look at the crossmyloof yeasts too as their very cheap.
Many of the reciepes have sugar in them. Iirc GW uses sugar as he says (at the time of writing, although it's quite easy to make) it would bw easier for brewers to use sugar instead of invert syrup. You can use Golden Syrup as it's partially inverted (or have a go at making invert syrup if you want. There's loads of stuff on the web/internet/this forum and others if you want to have a go)

Edit: Re-reading your op I may be confusing it with GW's Brew your own british real ale
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:30 PM   #3
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No I believe it's that one. Has a pint of beer on front with a load of equipment inside it.
Sounds like a great book.
I'm hoping it's got a decent IPA recipe. Summers approaching and these ones go down particularly well
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:57 PM   #4
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I have the book but have never done a recipe from it. I might do in the autumn as I'm planning either a bitter or an 80/- as one of my 3 autumn/winter beers.
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Old 07-04-2017, 09:39 PM   #5
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No I believe it's that one. Has a pint of beer on front with a load of equipment inside it.
Sounds like a great book.
I'm hoping it's got a decent IPA recipe. Summers approaching and these ones go down particularly well
It's a great book but it doesnt have any IPA recipes in it. It's all Bitters, Milds and a few reciepes for dark (porters/stouts) beer.
Greg Hughes' Home Brew Beer would suit you better. It has one or two reciepes from almost all of the major beer styles including IPA's (both English and American)
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Old 07-04-2017, 09:50 PM   #6
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To say I'm not disappointed would be an understatement. Never mind I can still find the odd IPA recipe. Is the key to these to use pale and Munich with plenty of hops added (citra casscade eg) during different stages of the boil with a nice dry hop?

I'm sure Theyl be a recipe on here I can follow.
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Old 07-04-2017, 09:58 PM   #7
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Said in my best Ray Winston voice, 'av a butchers'

https://byo.com/hops/item/921-ipa-a-...wo-beer-styles
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Old 08-04-2017, 02:54 AM   #8
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Said in my best Ray Winston voice, 'av a butchers'

https://byo.com/hops/item/921-ipa-a-...wo-beer-styles
So glad u didn't choose dani dyer
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Old 08-04-2017, 07:33 AM   #9
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It's a great book but it doesnt have any IPA recipes in it. It's all Bitters, Milds and a few reciepes for dark (porters/stouts) beer.
Greg Hughes' Home Brew Beer would suit you better.
Splash out and buy both books - I have, they complement each other.

An abundance of hoppy US-style beers are a relatively recent thing, my version of the Wheeler book (3rd edition) was written in 2009 before those beers became popular. So it's mainly traditional British ales.

I've made loads of recipes out of the Wheeler book and most have been great with just the odd average one. My favourites are Summer Lightning, Exmoor Gold, Exmoor Beast, Donnington SBA and Old Peculier. I also made up a decent Mild based on a couple of the recipes.
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Old 08-04-2017, 07:41 AM   #10
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As Darrell say having both books is deffo an excellent option. I got my GH's book when it was £3 as Amazon. Unfortunately (afaik) it's gone back up to about £8 but still definately worth it. I never even considerered making (pseudo) lagers until reading the lager recipes in the GH's book and realizing many would match my beer tastes
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