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£7.60 for a pint?

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Thatscold

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Siren Craft is only 2 miles from me, and much as I want to like their beer (and I've tried a lot of them) I struggle.
 

samale

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I would have no problems paying it if it was an imperial barrel aged beer. I think I seen Steve paying 9 pounds or something for a half pint of imperial stout. Not a chance for a 5% kolsch
 

samale

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Saying that the price of a pint of Guinness down south will set you back 5 euro in some city's
 

Markk

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One of the most expensive beers I almost bought was a pint of Peroni in a restaurant in Dubai last year. Having done the currency conversion it worked out £17.63
 

obscure

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Part of me thinks that we don’t really question paying £20 for a bottle of mediocre wine in a restaurant so is it really so wrong to see similar prices for some beers. Pre pandemic I was having a drink with work (and paid for by work) the Old Fashioned I had was £15 and was not even close to being the most expensive drink on the menu (beer their was about £8 a pint).
 

bobukbrewer

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If England's pubs have only 1/3 of number of customers, they must charge 3 x former prices PLUS additional costs of sanitiser, gel, masks, screens, etc. So £12 a pint is very fair. If you want pubs in the future, keep the pubs in existence NOW. Cheers !!!!
 

Binkei Huckaback

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Think the most expensive place I've found is Cask in Pimlico CASK Pub & Kitchen

They had an Imperial Stout for something like £14 a third of a pint. Just looked at their latest beer list and they have Ale Apothecary from Oregon for a whopping £69 for 750ml ashock1ashock1

And no I didn't pay those prices, really wanted to try the place out but as I got close decided to go to the good ol' Jugged Hare up the road and a pint of Fullers for much less.
The Cask Beer Kitchen have cask ale at around the same price as a pint of Fuller's anywhere else. If you were drinking London Pride, that's 4.1% ABV, if the ale Apothecary beer you're talking about is El Cuatro, it's 10.58% ABV, so there is a big difference in duty alone. The cost of fermenter space on a strong beer is more. Most of Fuller's is probably knocked out pretty quickly.

Have you though about economy of scale? How many tons of malt and hops are bought be Fuller's and how many thousand barrels of London Pride are brewed every week compared to a small brewery?

Fuller's brewery wil be fairly industrialised, the beer aged (if at all) in stainless steel tanks, whereas El Cuatro is afed in wooden barrels. In many US states, to legally sell your beer outside of tour own tap room, you have to sell through a distributor, so there's someone else taking a cut (though to be fair, I don't know if this applies to exporting outside of the USA)

Then there's import duty to consider; also transport. How did it get here? Was it sent by ship, or was it flown in to avoid the chance of it sitting on a dock in a metal container getting alternately hot and cold and damaging the flavour?

Finally, how many barrels of a well know beer at 4.1% ABV is a pub likely to get through vs bottles of 10.58% ABV beer? The pub will need to factor in what that beer is costing them to sit there until it's sold.

Sorry if it was not your intention, but it does sound as if you were saying that the Cask Beer and Kitchen is an expensive pub, whereas the Jugged Hare is cheaper and better value.

I've never been to The Jugged Hare, but have been to the Cask Beer and Kitchen and yes, they had some very expensive beer, didn't I think it an overly expensive pub.

Similarly, I've drunk London Pride and enjoy it greatly, but would never pay anywhere near £69 for 750ml of it. I've not had any of Ale Apothecary's beers, so have no idea of the quality, but if I'd heard good things about it and had £69 burning a hole in my pocket and it was a special occassion? Maybe.
 

mothman

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Paid £5 for a pint at a pub in Newcastle from a beer brewed just across the other side of the river. Had enjoyed the same beer in Edinburgh for around £3.90.

I consider a £5 a little steep, but I was prepared to swallow it (no pun intended), however, what really annoyed me was the fact that it was definitely at room temperature, in fact probably even slightly warmer. To add insult to injury I was told by the 'knowledgeable' server that cask beer is normally warm, but the keg beer is cold if I'd prefer that.

Looking forward to my Raspberry Stout this weekend at the correct temperature pulled through an Angram.
 

phildo79

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£7.60 for a kolsch is a fooking joke! Can't imagine too many peeps queuing up to buy that. I once paid £15 for 1/3 of a 20% imp stout. It was delicious but I didn't order a second. As previously mentioned, don't mind paying for something a bit special but is kolsch really that special?
 

Galena

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If England's pubs have only 1/3 of number of customers, they must charge 3 x former prices PLUS additional costs of sanitiser, gel, masks, screens, etc. So £12 a pint is very fair. If you want pubs in the future, keep the pubs in existence NOW. Cheers !!!!
You are joking of course (aren't you?) On that principal you will be happy to pay 300% for all your shopping.
 

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