All grain brewing or kits

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Jonboypeace

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Hi I was hoping someone can help me iam starting up brewing first attempt sat and just wanting to know if you should brew from a kit and if so wot are the best or is there a way to use lme and still use fresh hops and sugar bits like that just to get me going or can I go for a all grain mashing and sparge brew if the are any recipes out there that are idiot proof I have got the gear to full mash I have a brewster brulotion 2nd hand but iam hoping this will get me up and running any help would be appreciated thank you
 

Gerryjo

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Assuming you have all the gear required there is no reason not to go AG as there is plenty of help out there and many of the HB stores have ready made AG kits ready to brew which when starting out would be an advantage as it takes out the work of buying everything individually and building a recipe.
Be sure to get a good handle on cleaning and sanitisation as if not this will put all your hard work at risk.
Also bear in mind to set aside around six hours for an AG brew as this is what it will take roughly.
Plenty of vids on YouTube to help you out... Good luck and happy brewing.
 

aamcle

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Do yourself a great favour don't struggle for advice on the net especially not FB instead BUY A BOOK!

A few pounds spent on a good in your hand book will save you many times it's price in aggravation.


Atb. Aamcle
 
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Covrich

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Both options are good, kits will allow you to focus on the cleaning sanitation and fermenting side of the brewing process.. BUT if you are feeling confident to go straight in then AG..

Like Gerryjo says a lot of Homebrew stores have AG mash kits which are essentially a pre weighed out recipie, so I would start with one of them to get to grips with the process
 

Jonboypeace

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Assuming you have all the gear required there is no reason not to go AG as there is plenty of help out there and many of the HB stores have ready made AG kits ready to brew which when starting out would be an advantage as it takes out the work of buying everything individually and building a recipe.
Be sure to get a good handle on cleaning and sanitisation as if not this will put all your hard work at risk.
Also bear in mind to set aside around six hours for an AG brew as this is what it will take roughly.
Plenty of vids on YouTube to help you out... Good luck and happy brewing.
 

Jonboypeace

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Great thanks I think I have all the gear the brewster should do most of the process something I don't understand yet is the sparging part the brewster has a built in sparger which as a pump he recirculates the wort for wot I have seen on video but all I have read states to boil some water in a separate pan ?
 

Jonboypeace

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Yes thank you sat /sun are the brew days and this coinsides with a learning day for my 2 kids on weighing and scientific approaches lol
 
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Jonboypeace

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Do yourself a great favour don't struggle for advice on the net especially not FB instead BUY A BOOK!

A few pounds spent on a good in your hand book will save you many times it's price in aggravation.


Atb. Aamcle
I have bought a couple of books but they do seem to be behind the times I kinda know the basics won't have changed but the equipment has thank you
 

Gerryjo

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Great thanks I think I have all the gear the brewster should do most of the process something I don't understand yet is the sparging part the brewster has a built in sparger which as a pump he recirculates the wort for wot I have seen on video but all I have read states to boil some water in a separate pan ?
Sparging is rinsing the grains after the allotted time has completed for the mash unless you are doing an infusion mash where then all the grain and liquid are added together..
 

MmmBeer

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Great thanks I think I have all the gear the brewster should do most of the process something I don't understand yet is the sparging part the brewster has a built in sparger which as a pump he recirculates the wort for wot I have seen on video but all I have read states to boil some water in a separate pan ?
After you have mashed the grain for an hour and recirculated the wort over the grain bed, the temperature is raised to 75°C and held for 10 mins to stop the grain enzymes, then the inner grain bucket is raised up and supported above the wort and the hot sparge water (at ~ 75°C) is poured slowly over the grainbed to wash out any remaining soluble sugars.

I'm not familiar with the Brewster unit personally, so I watched a video online, which was probably the same on you saw, from your comments, as it glosses over the sparge step. Based on that video, I would look to mount the unit on a lower table or surface to make it easier to lift the grain basket and to pour the sparge water in. When sparging I use a 1 litre jug to pour the hot water in, trying to keep a constant level af water (~1 cm) above the grain bed. Your brewing software should tell you what quantities of mash amd sparge water to use in your recipe, if not feel free to ask.
 

Jonboypeace

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After you have mashed the grain for an hour and recirculated the wort over the grain bed, the temperature is raised to 75°C and held for 10 mins to stop the grain enzymes, then the inner grain bucket is raised up and supported above the wort and the hot sparge water (at ~ 75°C) is poured slowly over the grainbed to wash out any remaining soluble sugars.

I'm not familiar with the Brewster unit personally, so I watched a video online, which was probably the same on you saw, from your comments, as it glosses over the sparge step. Based on that video, I would look to mount the unit on a lower table or surface to make it easier to lift the grain basket and to pour the sparge water in. When sparging I use a 1 litre jug to pour the hot water in, trying to keep a constant level af water (~1 cm) above the grain bed. Your brewing software should tell you what quantities of mash amd sparge water to use in your recipe, if not feel free to ask.
That's brilliant thank you
 

parpot

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Try the Part Grain kits, you only need a 15lt pot and then the normal FV brewing kit. These kits only take around 2.5-3 hours and are a great way to get started in the real brewing world, slightly more than the tinned kits but a whole lot better IMHO
 

Jonboypeace

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Try the Part Grain kits, you only need a 15lt pot and then the normal FV brewing kit. These kits only take around 2.5-3 hours and are a great way to get started in the real brewing world, slightly more than the tinned kits but a whole lot better IMHO
yes i thought that so i have bought a st austel tribute and a black sheep part grain kits iam going to use my brewster brewulotion mash unit so i can get use to it thank you
 

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