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Anyone else fed up with NEIPA?

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Mrhandsome

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No, I agree. If I wanted to drink something that looked and tasted like boozy fruit juice I'd buy fruit juice and cheap vodka. Don't get me wrong, there's a a place for the style but the proliferation at the expense of variety isn't good.
The "trendy" nature of craft beer is its most irritating aspect, in my opinion. That said, I minded a lot less when west coast IPAs were in vogue at the beginning of the craft beer explosion as I much preferred that style, and it seemed there were fewer terrible examples of the style around (at least at first!).

It'll be interesting to see how many modern beers stand the test of time. I'd hazard a guess that with very few exceptions none of them will be on the shelves in 10-20 years. I think NEIPA is reaching the limit of its popularity now though, bets on what'll be the next fad?
My money is on overly hopped lager for the new fad.
 

MmmBeer

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I think I have only tried 3 or 4 NEIPA's and although they were an interesting diversion from real beer, I shant be rushing to buy more. Part of the trouble is that there are too many sheeple out there who rely on the faceholes on the likes of youbook and ar$etube to tell them what they should be eating, drinking, wearing etc. rather than actually making up their own minds.

Someone mentioned earlier that bitters have all been renamed as golden or amber ales and it is hard to find a beer on a supermarket shelf that is honest enough to call itself a bitter, yet bitter makes up more than half of the beer I drink.
 

MickDundee

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Someone mentioned earlier that bitters have all been renamed as golden or amber ales and it is hard to find a beer on a supermarket shelf that is honest enough to call itself a bitter, yet bitter makes up more than half of the beer I drink.
TBF, I’ve always considered bitter to be more of an amber colour, if it was pale and less bitter it was a golden ale and if it was pale and still bitter it was a pale ale, but I’ve only been drinking real ale for about 15 years so it could still be a relatively “new” trend.

But I have noticed a lot of beers calling themselves “amber ales” when they used to be called bitters. Wherry is one that has changed within the last 4-5 years. I remember being excited to see it on cask when I first started home brewing and it was definitely called a bitter on the pump clip. Last year, same pub and it was whereby amber ale.
 

obscure

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My money is on overly hopped lager for the new fad.
Havent actually seen any of these (and can you really call a highly hopped beer a larger even if it is fermented with a larger yeast and at low temperature and what ever else you do to brew larger, if you haven’t guessed I don’t brew larger so have a pretty vague idea of what you do to make one).
 

PhilBrew

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But I have noticed a lot of beers calling themselves “amber ales” when they used to be called bitters. Wherry is one that has changed within the last 4-5 years. I remember being excited to see it on cask when I first started home brewing and it was definitely called a bitter on the pump clip. Last year, same pub and it was whereby amber ale.
... it is a very weird trend :confused.: ... there's a very good post on Martin Cornell's blog that discusses the phenomenon there (link), complete with images of "then" and "now" pump clips :?:

Cheers, PhilB
 

MmmBeer

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Interesting to note that when changing from bitter to amber ale a number have also dropped in strength.
 

Mrhandsome

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How does it taste?
I spotted this in Aldi the other day. I'd tried Show Off by Camden Town Brewery a few days before (which was lovely) so was curious to see if this was similar....

It tastes just like a regular lager to me.
 

phildo79

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I've tried various IPL's. Not quite lager, not quite IPA. None have made me want to go back for more.
 

Paul Roberts

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Seems to be an abundance of DIPA at moment in the supermarkets.

I'd like to see more black IPAs
 

Kerby

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Fond of a DIPA every now and then, I liked Brewdog Mr President when I could get it in Tesco. I toyed with doing a Black IPA today but went with a Rye IPA in the end, it’s a nice beer for the autumn with a bit more body and a little roasted nutty element. Just cooling Now (no chill), should be ready for the fermenter in a couple of hours.
 

darlacat

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But I have noticed a lot of beers calling themselves “amber ales” when they used to be called bitters.
I imagine it's harder to sell beer as 'best bitter' these days, due to negative connotations since the 'craft beer' movement/perceptions of younger drinkers - especially when competing for space on shelves.
 

Rich Leeds

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:beer1:I think the trend of crazy NEIPA’s will fade as we return to simple single hop styles and stick to classic recipes.
 

St00

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I'm fed up with pastry stouts. I got in to beer and making beer because I don't want alcopops or rice lagers etc. Adding extracts to a good well made stout reduces it to WKD as far as I'm concerned.

That said however, if a brewery has to follow a trend to make money by making trend beers (NEIPA's, Pastry Stouts, Milkshake IPAs), which enables them to make low selling beers like Barleywines etc. then it's a good thing. My personal preferences/likes/dislikes aren't going to make popular things unpopular.

NEIPA's revitalised "Craft" beer sales in America as they are a gateway beer for many who find classical Westcoast IPAs too bitter.
 
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