Ban on new petrol and diesel cars in UK from 2030 under PM's green plan

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Chippy_Tea

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Or perhaps an approved used one. I bought a 7 year old approved used suzuki splash for my daughter and it was A1 condition.
It will be a approved used i am hoping in 18 months the price will have dropped to a point i can afford the 1.4 mild hybrid, i am hoping to get the mid spec SZT, i like the spec of the SZ5 but i wouldn't use a full length sun roof and having OCD keyless entry would be a constant worry as i have read too many horror stories about cars going missing in the middle of the night.
 

Leon103

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It will be a approved used i am hoping in 18 months the price will have dropped to a point i can afford the 1.4 mild hybrid, i am hoping to get the mid spec SZT, i like the spec of the SZ5 but i wouldn't use a full length sun roof and having OCD keyless entry would be a constant worry as i have read too many horror stories about cars going missing in the middle of the night.
This thread popping up as just reminded me that I need to speak with the garage to see if my car as arrived
 

Northern_Brewer

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It's a little OT but since hydrogen has been mentioned, here's the view of Michael Liebreich (founder of BloombergNEF and general guru on this kind of stuff) on the order in which sectors he thinks will adopt hydrogen first. The "A"s will be the first at hydrogen prices of around $1/kg (forecast for 2025) or sooner if carbon taxes etc promote earlier adoption. You'll note that H2FC (hydrogen fuel cell) cars are among the least likely to be adopted.
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This blog from a Cambridge professor of engineering takes the view that hydrogen is so inefficient that it won't even be important for long-distance trucks. He's particularly keen on the idea of Electric Road Systems - effectively a trolleybus system for trucks on motorways which do away with the energy loss (and time taken) from charging batteries.

Decarbonising domestic heating is going to be a really tricky one, it probably requires the massive installation of heat pumps but the economics are so unfavourable right now there's going to have to be some serious rethinking of how the system works.
 

trummy

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Excluding heat pumps as they will be difficult to install in the newly built mass housing estates with practically no garden, will electric boilers be the solution? Where each house has solar panels feeding electricity back into the grid when not required
Long distance trucks/large vans is a tricky one where their seems no obvious front runner at the moment.
 

Northern_Brewer

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Excluding heat pumps as they will be difficult to install in the newly built mass housing estates with practically no garden, will electric boilers be the solution? Where each house has solar panels feeding electricity back into the grid when not required
You're thinking of ground-source heatpumps, whereas most will be air-source heatpumps - not quite as efficient as ground-source but a lot more practical, they're like fitting an aircon unit. The people closest to this kind of thing seem to think that we will end up deploying ASHPs in their millions by 2030 but a lot has got to change before that happens. Notably we've been deliberately making electricity expensive in order to finance the electricity infrastructure converting to renewables, and gas cheap to wean people off oil etc. Now that electricity is the "good guy" and gas the "bad guy", we need to make electricity cheap relative to gas.
 

Justin Dean

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I did a comparison on running cost between my petrol smart car and nissan leaf. Leaf was £350 per year cheaper for me. Unfortunately the increased monthly pcp cost of the leaf would wipe that saving out in 12 weeks. The economics are rubbish....until that is fixed then it is a no goer. The decision is too easy to not change yet.
 

Leon103

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Really happy with my hybrid. Better mpg and loads more power. Towed our caravan for the first time last week and a much better return on the mpg
 

Justin Dean

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Is that the petrol engine in you hybrid helping you there? It does make a lot of sense.
 

Justin Dean

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Look good for a compact. Much what I am looking for. I guess it comes down to cost
 

Leon103

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The vitara is what we got. I think the new vitara came out in 2015 and we must have had at least 7 of them since. This hybrid seems the best of them. A ton of safety features which are annoying to begin with and need some getting used to.
 

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