Beaverdale Shiraz kit. Transfer question.

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jakejoe30

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The instruction for the kit say. If you are transferring at 1010 you should check the wine after 5 days. If you don't want to transfer at 1010 leave for 15-20 days to fully ferment then transfer. Which is the best time to transfer? Thanks

Also it recommends filling bucket to 23.5L. However, others have got a fuller boded wine by only filling to 20L. Will I need to put less yeast in if I do this?
 

lupinehorror

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fermenting it right out will result in a drier wine.
i'd put all the yeast in even when filling it short.
 

johncrobinson

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Kits offer a lot of flexibility
As you say brewing short you can get more body Also by adding more sugar you can get more alcohol.

As for the yeast yes put it all in
Something magical is going to happen,You will find when you siphon the wine off the sediment there is about 30 times as much yeast left in the bottom of the fermenter as you started with.Magic eh ;)

As for the transfer time,The real question is do you prefer drier or sweeter wines????
(1) if you like dry wine leave to ferment right out
(2) if you prefer a bit of sweetness rack at 1010
NOTE If you rack off at 1010 you MUST use the stabilizer that came with your kit before bottling.
 

jakejoe30

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Thanks all.

Do I put oak chippings in secondary fermenter as they will be in the wine longer?
 

johncrobinson

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Most people oak during the maturation stage, Again though you have lots of options.But i would not put them in the primary.
If you prefer a really strong flavour you can lightly toast them under the grill.
 

John Galt

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Kits offer a lot of flexibility
As you say brewing short you can get more body Also by adding more sugar you can get more alcohol.

As for the yeast yes put it all in
Something magical is going to happen,You will find when you siphon the wine off the sediment there is about 30 times as much yeast left in the bottom of the fermenter as you started with.Magic eh ;)

As for the transfer time,The real question is do you prefer drier or sweeter wines????
(1) if you like dry wine leave to ferment right out
(2) if you prefer a bit of sweetness rack at 1010
NOTE If you rack off at 1010 you MUST use the stabilizer that came with your kit before bottling.
I take it your not a advocate of brewing it short? I haven’t done it yet myself but I’m tempted. Some places I have read to use the right amount of water and some say doing to 20litre works out good. Suppose can only find out by trying.
 

johncrobinson

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No years ago a lot of years ago when i first started doing kits they were not as advanced as they are today,The end result was often rather watery tasting compared to a good commercial wine.

Today its a different story,They have perfected the technology but another monster has reared its head,Cost.!!!

In an effort to produce product at the lowest possible cost many manufacturers cut down on the most expensive part:- the grape juice.
Unfortunately that is also the most important part.

Many members on here have therefore found a big improvement in their wines by making the kit 10-15% short.
Its really just compensating for stingy manufactures.
 

johncrobinson

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I should also say that a lot of members on here still don't think they have got RED kits right yet.
while
Whites and Rose seem above reproach.
 

TonyT

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I should also say that a lot of members on here still don't think they have got RED kits right yet.
while
Whites and Rose seem above reproach.
I’ll second that, I’ve done Beaverdale Shiraz a couple of times and found it a bit thin but I’ve always done it as per the instruction. I think next time I’ll make it to 21 litres instead of the 23 to see if it finishes with more body. Their Pinot Grigio always seems to turn out fine.
 

John Galt

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No years ago a lot of years ago when i first started doing kits they were not as advanced as they are today,The end result was often rather watery tasting compared to a good commercial wine.

Today its a different story,They have perfected the technology but another monster has reared its head,Cost.!!!

In an effort to produce product at the lowest possible cost many manufacturers cut down on the most expensive part:- the grape juice.
Unfortunately that is also the most important part.

Many members on here have therefore found a big improvement in their wines by making the kit 10-15% short.
Its really just compensating for stingy manufactures.
I made a WE chateau du roux that’s came out decent- 8 litres of grape juice though! Also got a nebbolio with grape skins on the go at the moment. Reckon this shall come out good In a year, but it’s hard messy work. Im more thinking for the Wineworks superiors to make to 20litre as have 5.5litre if juice. Reckon I shall be happy if it comes out okay even with the shortage. It’s also easier to make.
 

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