BITS=The simplest, cheapest AG possible.

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radioactive

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It all sounds very interesting I wonder if it permanently stains the nets as I could volunteer to wash ours
this needs only to be done once you understand where I am going with this :shock: :)
 

lambert

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radioactive said:
It all sounds very interesting I wonder if it permanently stains the nets as I could volunteer to wash ours
this needs only to be done once you understand where I am going with this :shock: :)
The material does eventually gets stained a lovely mocha colour. But it will blend in really well if you paint the walls cream...
 

Algernon

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anthonyUK said:
rich27500 said:
Algernon, go biab, you won't regret it!
+1. It really is the simplest, most forgiving AG solution and the initial outlay can be very minimal.
I now own a 70L stock pot and 2 sheets of voile. I just need about 200 bottles to make space for my next brew!
 

Duxuk

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Algernon said:
anthonyUK said:
I now own a 70L stock pot and 2 sheets of voile. I just need about 200 bottles to make space for my next brew!
I would try a smaller brew first time. How about a 13-15 litre? You can get 24 or more 500ml pet bottles if you don't waste any, which you shouldn't do with BIAB, it's very efficient. If you're using a domestic stove you will still be able to heat the wort, after draining the mash, in less than an hour with the lid on. If you try to brew a 50l batch you will find it takes ages to reach the boil.

Here are a few points that I would add to my origional post now I've done 7 AG brews.................

1. Use the hot tap to heat the bulk of your mash water if you have a combi boiler. A few kettlefulls and a bit of heat from the stove do the rest. You can still add a campden tab if you want to treat the water for chlorine derivatives. It's quicker this way.

2. Don't do any jiggling or squeezing of the sheets full of grain/hops. That way you get less break material coming through.

3. Skim the wort as it approaches the boil. You'll again reduce the amount of rubbish that endas up in the brew.

4. Boil with the lid on. A domestic cooker just doesn't give enough heat without. At least mine doesn't.

5. Use a luggage strap or bungees to hold the sheet around the stockpot and later the FV. A string is fiddley and less reliable.

6. don't just move your stockpot with mashing water to a cool ring on the cooker. If you do you're bound to burn your sheet. I've done it at least twice! Either do it in situ so the heat source is still beneath the pan, or take the pan away completely.

I did an APA yesterday at OG 1062 and 77.5% efficiency. Very pleased with the whole day, apart from burning the edge of the sheet!

Happy brewing.
 

Algernon

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Thanks for the tips :-)
I won't be brewing up to 70L just yet, but I have only 1 FV which is full of beer waiting for bottles, I do have a couple of PB's available so I could, in theory, drop my beer into those while I gather bottles.
I'll certainly bear in mind the squeezing (or the lack of) to avoid getting greb in the brew.
It reaches over 3 gas rings so I should be able to keep a boil going. IIRC the pale malt we have here is fine to boil with the lid on - rumour has it only US malt has loads of DMS precursors in it.
If I whack the boiler up to full power it puts out 60 degree water, so hardly any heat needed to get to mash temps. Do most people just wrap the whole pot in a duvet or similar for insulation? Does that work?
I have previously only extracted tiddly amounts using a 6L saucepan, so this is somewhat of a step up.
Should be fine though :-)
 

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