Boddingtons Bitter clone

Discussion in 'Complete and Brewed Recipes' started by glynb, Jun 21, 2015.

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  1. Nov 10, 2019 #21

    foxy

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    Sorry Clint only got one from G.W' s early book again no SRM
    3,7 kg Pale malt
    0,020 Black malt

    In the copper
    120g cane sugar
    29 g Fuggles hops
    21 g Goldings hops
    13 g Whitbread Goldings hops these three start of boil

    3 g Northern Brewer hops
    5 g Brambling Cross hops
    10 g EKG these 3 last 15 minutes.

    mash 90 mins 65 C
    boil 2 hrs ?
    ABV 3.6%
    Final Volume 23 litres This is for cask conditioned, if you are going to bottle up the Pale malt to get a more suitable ABV
    I imagine he would have picked up the recipe somewhere, it would be to difficult to distinguish all those hops.
     
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  2. Nov 10, 2019 #22

    An Ankoù

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    Boddington's was taken over in 1989. In the first edition of his book "The Real Ale Drinker's Almanac", published in 1989 (therefore the data will have been collected in the preceding years), Roger Protz has this to say about Boddington's Bitter:
    OG 1035 ABV 3.8%
    Ingredients:
    Pale malt 95.5%
    Patent malt 1.5%
    Cane sugar 3%
    Primed with cane sugar
    Bramling Cross 8%
    Fuggles 35%
    Goldings 30%
    Northern Brewer 5%
    and Whitbread Golding Variety 22%
    Whole hops (I presume this means all the hops were whole hops. I think Northern Brewer was grown in UK then, I don't think it is any longer).

    Tasting Notes:
    Nose: Complex floral, lemon jelly and spice aromas
    Palate: Flinty dryness in the mouth, long hard finish with hop bitterness and tart fruit
    Comments: A remarkable light golden bitter, a fine quenching session ale or excellent with fish dishes. The brewer detects slight brandy notes on the nose.

    There. I would have thought a recipe could be formulated from all that. Note that there is no crystal malt, which, no doubt, accounts for the "flinty dryness".
     
  3. Nov 10, 2019 #23

    Horners

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    My first brew after stepping up from kits was the extract version of this but from Wheelers more recent version. Looking at my notes it was just pale, a bit of crystal and the sugar, ekg at start and fuggles towards the end. Colourwise it looked right but cant vouch for the taste as I cocked up the DME measurement quite badly (an early lesson in weighing stuff evem when it comes prepacked) and then bunged extra sugar in at the end to try and up the gravity ( which not at that stage having realised I was 500g light on malt was inexplicably low).
     
  4. Nov 10, 2019 #24

    F00b4r

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  5. Nov 10, 2019 #25

    An Ankoù

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    I think Boddington's Bitter is a post-war phenomenon as many, if not all, these brews seemed to have suffered from the austerities of the time. Indeed I've got a couple of recipes for Boddington's CC which seems to be some kind of strong ale with an abv well over that of Boddington's Bitter.
     
  6. Nov 10, 2019 #26

    An Ankoù

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    That looks pretty much the business. As you would expect as Roger Protz was co-author, I've just remembered.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  7. Nov 13, 2019 #27

    pilgrimhudd

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    I went to the redwood forests in northern California/Oregon about 10 years ago, camped in a national park, met the exceptionally friendly park ranger who as soon as he heard my accent exclaimed 'oooh your British, I love your beer!' I asked him what he liked best and he replied (phonetically) 'Bodeingtons'. Oh how I laughed.
     
  8. Nov 13, 2019 #28

    chesters-mild

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    I lived in Longsight in the 60s & 70s, and yes Boddies was OK then, but mostly drank in The Red Lion - Didsbury - ('cos it was a good place to meet girls) Remember we all shed tears of sorrow when the (Marsdons) beer went up to 2/6 a pint. Mind you £2 would get a belly full of beer a packet of fags, bus fare, and pie & chips on the way home ! Happy days.
    Cheers
     
  9. Nov 13, 2019 #29

    Northern_Brewer

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    Ron Pattinson has published a number of original recipes over the years, his most recent is from 1987, unless that's too recent for you? It's pretty much just a pale/Goldings SMaSH, with sugar and other adjuncts at various times in the 20th century.

    Don't know if there's any WLP038 Manchester still kicking around suppliers following its recent Vault release, otherwise something like Omega Gulo might give you the 90+% attenuation that they used to get in the 70s.
     
  10. Nov 14, 2019 #30

    Bulldog.

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    "Loopy Juice" True Boddington's was the proper beer. It was the golden nectar. Today's stuff shouldn't bare the name
     
  11. Nov 15, 2019 #31

    An Ankoù

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    That's interesting. I've got his 1998, 2001 edition and the recipe is different. it includes crystal malt, which Protz' Almanac doesn't include. What edition have you got, I'll try and get hold of a copy.
     
  12. Nov 15, 2019 #32

    ACBEV

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  13. Nov 15, 2019 #33

    foxy

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    This is a 1993 copy by Wheeler and Protz.
     
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  14. Nov 16, 2019 #34

    An Ankoù

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    Thanks. That edition is too expensive on Amazon, but with your recipe and Protz' notes, I've managed to knock a recipe together. I thought the grain bill was a bit high for an OG of 1035, by the way. Particularly with the sugar addition.
     
  15. Nov 16, 2019 #35

    foxy

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    You had me worried there for a minute, I do adjust the recipes a bit and add more malt instead of maltose syrup or sugar, but that is what is written,Phew.
     
  16. Nov 16, 2019 #36

    An Ankoù

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    Well, a half batch of 11.5 litres is spluttering away in the cauldron as we speak. Hadn't intended this one, but I'd cultured up a yeast and it wasn't ready for my Thursday brew day, so I needed to get it used. Boddy's should be alright with West Yorkshire Ale Yeast, it's not that far from Keighly to Manchester.
     
  17. Nov 16, 2019 #37

    foxbat

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    What was it like? I've often wondered if blackstrap + golden syrup would make a passable substitute for No3 invert. Could you taste the molasses?
     
  18. Nov 17, 2019 #38

    ACBEV

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    I've brewed that recipe twice in the past, the first with 35g black treacle and the second with 20g blackstrap. In both cases I think I added a tad to much, although the beers were really good, with no noticeable molasses taste, but the blackstrap in particular adds something apart from colour.

    As for your question aka golden syrup + blackstrap to make brewers invert sugar substitute, I think its close enough to the real thing not to bother making the stuff.

    My recipes for brewers invert 1 through 4... (1kg)
    No. 1... 990g Golden Syrup, 10g Blackstrap
    No. 2... 970g Golden Syrup, 30g Blackstrap
    No. 3... 940g Golden Syrup, 60g Blackstrap
    No. 4... 800g Golden Syrup, 200g Blackstrap

    I only use Meridian Blackstrap. it should be used sparingly as its very bitter and very black!
     
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  19. Nov 17, 2019 #39

    jjsh

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    Totally agree with this, also be aware that there is Meridian Blackstrap and Meridian Organic Blackstrap - the latter is darker in my experience.
     
  20. Nov 21, 2019 #40

    Northern_Brewer

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    FWIW henken at Unholymess uses somewhat less blackstrap for the dilution method, I guess based on colour :
    http://www.unholymess.com/blog/beer-brewing-info/making-brewers-invert

    He also has instructions for inverting sugar directly.
    (the site's been abandoned for some time, and seems to have been hacked, so beware of clicking on some of the links!)
     

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