Books for brewing please

Discussion in 'Brewing Books & Publications' started by Piperbrew, Dec 8, 2017.

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  1. Dec 8, 2017 #1

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    Well as I have been tempted to go ''all grain'' can any of you recommend any books that will be good in order I can learn more please. Also what would be a good beer IPA or bitter to start with please. Finally are there any Ringwood beer clones out there that are very good please?

    Cheers

    Pete
     
  2. Dec 8, 2017 #2

    yeastinfection

    yeastinfection

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    Gregg Hughes home brew beer, seems really popular
     
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  3. Dec 8, 2017 #3

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    Cheers Yeast....great name by the way:lol:
     
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  4. Dec 8, 2017 #4

    IainM

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    How to Brew by John Palmer is a good introduction. IPA and bitter are both good choices for a first AG. There are a few Ringwood clones out there, including Graham Wheeler's one. I haven't done it but Wheeler's recipes are usually decent. You can even get the Ringwood yeast as Wyeast do it.
     
  5. Dec 8, 2017 #5

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    Thanks...are Wyeast in the UK?
     
  6. Dec 8, 2017 #6

    IainM

    IainM

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    It's an American company but many of the online homebrew shops in the UK stock their yeasts.
     
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  7. Dec 9, 2017 #7

    Fil

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    In addition to the authors listed above I would also recommend the books from Dave line and Graham wheeler too. Every brewer will try Grahams TTL recipe an lurve it ;)

    If a beardy weirdy hipster you may appreciate the books by Randy Mosher, . My Bias and Joking apart, Moshers Radical brewing is a well respected book, more the US style of brewing tho.

    If looking for further reading beyond the 'basic mechanics/procedures' Chris Whites 'Yeast' is a surprisingly easy read and is highly enlightening, its in a series of books covering the 4 main ingredients in beer Yeast, Grain, Water and Hops, All with a US slant but with yeast thats not really an issue.. (ive read all 4 and Yeast is the well thumbed and tatty book ;) )
     
  8. Dec 9, 2017 #8

    Bigcol49

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    Hi!
    John Palmer's book is now in the 4th edition, but the first edition is available free, online.
    http://www.howtobrew.com
     
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  9. Dec 9, 2017 #9

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    Cheers guys
     
  10. Dec 9, 2017 #10

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    I just had a look at the Malt Miller site. Obviously the reason I want the books is to learn methods but also to clone a few beers. Are the Malt Miller clones like the beers they copy, ie Forty Niner and Speckled Hen?
     
  11. Dec 9, 2017 #11

    Pavros

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    2 more to add to the list:
    Beer by James Morton
    Brew Your Own Big Book of Homebrewing.

    The Morton book is written in an easy to read style with recipes for a lot of different styles of beer

    I have just started the BYO book. Again, it covers the basics with some US craft beer clone recipes (and 1 for Fullers ESB).
     
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  12. Dec 9, 2017 #12

    chub1

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    Plus one for the Hughes book.Also have the homebrew handbook by Dave Law and Beshley Grimes and found that one a good read
     
  13. Dec 9, 2017 #13

    Clint

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    I have the Greg Hughes the Graham Wheeler camra and the US big book of homebrew. I've done a few out the Greg Hughes and a couple out of the wheeler none yet from the other. The recipes work well and are easy to follow. Just work out the kit that will work for you and make sure you have the time and space..like doctor who! Joking aside it's a very addictive hobby...I've usually got at least two of my books open!
     
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  14. Dec 9, 2017 #14

    Zephyr259

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    My reccomendations for new brewers are "How to Brew" by John Palmer and "Home brew Beer" by Greg Hughes.

    I really like "Radical Brewing" by Randy Mosher, good for some creative ideas and some history.

    "Designing Great Beers" by Ray Daniels give you the info needed to create your own recipes for a heap of different styles and is the reason I don't buy recipe focused books anymore.

    If you like Belgian styles then there's a series of 3 books: Brew Like a Monk, Farmhouse Ales and Wild Brews which are a very entertaining read which cover Trappist / Abbey Ales, Saison and Biere de Garde then sour and funky beers.

    It's a massive rabbit hole for a book-lover. :-)
     
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  15. Dec 9, 2017 #15

    Piperbrew

    Piperbrew

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    Cheers guys
     
  16. Dec 9, 2017 #16

    strange-steve

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    The only other book I would recommend that hasn't been mentioned, is Brewing Classic Styles by J. Zainasheff. It's primarily a recipe book with at least one recipe for every style and everything I've brewed from it has been great.
     
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  17. Dec 13, 2017 #17

    GerritT

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    So that's like five must-have books? Oh and maybe The Compleat Meadmaker, though Radical Brewing has some recipes too. And a Papazian, just because.
     
  18. Dec 13, 2017 #18

    BarnBrian

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    I've just finished reading Gordon Strong, "Brewing Better Beer", by far the best book I've read so far. It's more about teaching you how to work out for yourself how to make good beer and not so much recipe based.
     
  19. Dec 13, 2017 #19

    dan125

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    The Malt Miller kits are mainly designed/created by customers (great way to buy just the amounts you need for a recipe) but be cautious as they may not include everything you need - when I use the facility I often leave out a grain/hop if I already have some, or sometimes a grain/hop isn't available in the recipe creator so it has to be ordered separatley.
    If you don't want to create your own kit you may be better with the BrewUK all grain kits - https://www.brewuk.co.uk/ingredients/ingredientsgrains/all-grain-recipe-packs.html
     
  20. Dec 13, 2017 #20

    svenito

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    If it's cloning you are after have a look at CloneBrews by Tess Szamatulski and Mark Szamatulski. http://amzn.eu/aAu2CR2

    Has Mastering Homebrew by Randy Mosher been mentioned yet?

    Also Make Some Beer byErica Shea,Stephen Valand has some good recipes in it
     

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