Bottle conditioning sediment

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chrisriley83

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Does anyone know how to stop the sediment that collects in the bottom of the bottle when conditioning with sugar?
Just wondered if there’s anything you can add at the time of brewing or priming it?
 

the baron

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Not really possible the sediment is yeast cells and any cloudiness residue that has fallen out of suspension. It is not possible to carbonate bottles without some kind of sugar and yeast.
The answer is to use a high flocculating yeast (that is one that sticks to the bottom and forms a hard crust) and to pour carefully
 

chrisriley83

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Thanks guys, I’m new to brewing so still working it all out, I presume kegging with forced carbonation would be slightly better?
 

Agentgonzo

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It would be clearer. "Better" is subjective 😉. Many people have no issue with the haze you get from bottle conditioned beers. Many other people prefer clear beer.
 

Agentgonzo

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I don’t mind the haze but don’t want to have to leave a bit in the bottom every bottle to be thrown away 😂
You don't have to leave the dregs in the bottle! It's perfectly fine to drink. If you do it well, there is only a small dusting of sediment. If you use a flocculant yeast, most of it stays in the bottle. For some of mine with some yeasts (s-04 especially), I can invert the bottle and almost all the sediment stays in the bottle
 

damienair

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I only use bottles, and I pour carefully into a tilted 500ml glass every time. I do this for two reasons, so as not to have too big a head on the beer and also so as to get most of the beer out without disturbing the sediment at the bottom of the bottle. I end up with very little wasted beer left behind. I have purchased craft beers in the past which were bottle conditioned and they had a similar amount of sediment left behind in the bottle. Just pour carefully and slowly at an angle into a tilted glass and you won’t have any problems. I also rinse out the bottles straight afterwards so as to get out the sediment and I wash the bottles, it makes the next bottling day easier.
 

moto748

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As I've remarked before, I (nearly) always pour into a jug. But what I would say about bottle-conditioning in general is that whilst obviously some sediment is unavoidable, I've found that as I've improved my process, the amount of sediment is much reduced.
 

sifty

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Yep to above. Using whirlfloc, gelatin and cold crashing can have a huge effect on clarity. And (depending on the yeast) some time in the fridge after conditioning is complete can make it possible to empty the bottle almost completely with no sediment.

It's quite refreshing doing a hefeweizen or similar though where you don't worry about it... 🙂
 

chrisriley83

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Thanks again everyone, one last question
Is a whirlfloc tablet the same as a protofloc tablet?
 

sifty

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I think so. You'll have to check dosage though as I've only ever used whirlfloc. Half a tablet is good for a 25 litre brew...
 

Old Fart At Play

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+1 to moto748. I prefer bottled. I still use Irish Moss (same idea as protofloc etc); condition for 2 weeks; rack into separate vessel (rather than bottling from FV); and pour (carefully) into jug not directly into glass. Sediment never an issue - there is a tiny bit left in the bottle.
 
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Thanks again everyone, one last question
Is a whirlfloc tablet the same as a protofloc tablet?
Irish moss is a red seaweed, found growing around the coast of Ireland. Carrageena is extracted and is able to bind to proteins. Added to the copper, the boiling pan which is where it gets its name copper finings, before the end of boil aids clarity of the beer. Appropriate red seaweeds can be ground up into a fine powder to it can compressed into a tablet. Whirlfloc®️ is made from a red seaweed Eucheuma cottonii. Protofloc its the own brand, generic equivalent made from other species of red seaweed.
 
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Thanks guys, I’m new to brewing so still working it all out, I presume kegging with forced carbonation would be slightly better?
No not really, one is still trying not to get any lees into the keg or bottle, just a fact of life for the home brewer. There are losses from the kettle, fermenter and bottle. Still works out cheaper and more satisfying than buying pasteurised beer.
 

Brewshed

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I mainly use Nottingham yeast and fine with gelatine. I bottle condition for 2 - 3 weeks and give all the bottles a little rattle against each other after about a week (this dislodges any yeast that has stuck to the sides of the bottle and allows in to settle to the bottom). I pour carefully into a tilted glass keeping an eye on the yeast so that the blob of yeast is left in the bottle. I usually have less than 5ml left in the bottle when I empty it for rinsing.
 
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My bedroom was over the back-door and I only heard my Dad say it twice: once was after a session with Bass Red Label and the other time was after eating vodka-soaked salami! (Dad had spilled a bottle of vodka over a plate of the stuff!)

On both occasions, Dad got the same amount of sympathy and understanding off my Mam!

“I’m going to die Madge!”

“Well go and die at work then!”

Bass Red Label was not something to mess with!

Happy Days!
:hat:
 
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Simple solution is to use a yeast like gervin. It sticks everything to the bottom of the bottle and you can pour out every drop of beer. CML 5 is also good.
Styles that involve flavoursome yeasts like saison are a problem though as these yeasts don't stick to the bottom. Cold crashing really helps because it drops out all or much of the suspended particles in newly fermented wort. You still get the yeast from priming the bottles though, but this should be minimised.
 

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