Brew Books - What's On Your Shelf??

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thegrantickle

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My two absolute favourite brewing books are:
Technology Brewing and Malting - Wolfgang Kunze
Brew Like a Monk - Stan Hieronymus
 
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The go to for me John Palmer's 'How to Brew' and want to get the Monk book, also had a lot of fun with Brooklyn BrewShops two books, Make Some Beer and 52 Seasonal Recipes, small batch but also scaled upto Five Gallons
 

Disildor

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The Brew like a Monk is pretty nice, especially the last chapters in which he gives some precise guidance on how to brew Belgian beers.
 

nickjdavis

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My selection...

If you love Saisons and Biere de Gardes the Farmhouse Ales by Markowski is essential. The Brew Big book of Clone recipes has some interesting recipes as does the CloneBrews book next to it. Technically How to Brew and the malt/hops/yeast/water series are excellent though perhaps a bit intimidating for beginners. The Homebrwing for Dummies (like all the "for Dummies" series of books) is actually a very friendly introduction to brewing and the Greg Hughes book like many books published by Dorling Kindersley is a perfect example of how to clearly present your subject in an easy to read style with clear and relevant images. Moshers books are great and have plenty of information about non core brewing ingredients and some styles that are a bit rare or unusual.


books.jpg
 

EsterBanana

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My selection...

If you love Saisons and Biere de Gardes the Farmhouse Ales by Markowski is essential. The Brew Big book of Clone recipes has some interesting recipes as does the CloneBrews book next to it. Technically How to Brew and the malt/hops/yeast/water series are excellent though perhaps a bit intimidating for beginners. The Homebrwing for Dummies (like all the "for Dummies" series of books) is actually a very friendly introduction to brewing and the Greg Hughes book like many books published by Dorling Kindersley is a perfect example of how to clearly present your subject in an easy to read style with clear and relevant images. Moshers books are great and have plenty of information about non core brewing ingredients and some styles that are a bit rare or unusual.


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I absolutely loved 'Yeast', would you recommend which of the others to read next?
 

An Ankoù

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My selection...

If you love Saisons and Biere de Gardes the Farmhouse Ales by Markowski is essential. The Brew Big book of Clone recipes has some interesting recipes as does the CloneBrews book next to it. Technically How to Brew and the malt/hops/yeast/water series are excellent though perhaps a bit intimidating for beginners. The Homebrwing for Dummies (like all the "for Dummies" series of books) is actually a very friendly introduction to brewing and the Greg Hughes book like many books published by Dorling Kindersley is a perfect example of how to clearly present your subject in an easy to read style with clear and relevant images. Moshers books are great and have plenty of information about non core brewing ingredients and some styles that are a bit rare or unusual.


View attachment 57805
An excellent collection. What's the one on the very right like.
I was searching yesterday for a homebrew book for Australians written by Australian home brewers and I couldn't find one. Any ideas, anyone?
What are people's thoughts on James Morton? He seems to have put out his book, trousered the dosh and disappeared from the scene.
 

nickjdavis

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I absolutely loved 'Yeast', would you recommend which of the others to read next?
"Water"...its one of the driest books going but theres a huge amount of information in there...I never really got into "Malt" but i'll go back and have another go one day. "Hops" is okay.
 

nickjdavis

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An excellent collection. What's the one on the very right like.
I was searching yesterday for a homebrew book for Australians written by Australian home brewers and I couldn't find one. Any ideas, anyone?
What are people's thoughts on James Morton? He seems to have put out his book, trousered the dosh and disappeared from the scene.
Its full of useful little tidbits....to be honest I only bought it because I know one of the authors. Its more a book of individual tips (nearly 450 of them!!) rather than a book that tells you how to brew....but there are also 40-50 generic recipes at the back end of the book as well. I'd say its a book to dip in and out of rather than one to immerse yourself in.
 

EsterBanana

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"Water"...its one of the driest books going but theres a huge amount of information in there...I never really got into "Malt" but i'll go back and have another go one day. "Hops" is okay.
Nice one thank you, Water it is!

I will eventually end up with all 4, I just couldn't make my mind up, so happy to take your recommendation and just go for that next - thank you!
 

SouthDowns

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Randy Mosher - Mastering Homebrew made its way on to my bookshelf. A fantastic book; particularly the sections on recipe development and recipe inspiration. I like Randy's approach to brewing and his avoidance of brewing by numbers
 

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