Bulk priming question

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by critty, May 28, 2012.

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  1. May 28, 2012 #1

    critty

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    Hi guys! (sorry for posting lots of newbie questions)

    Just done a quick calculation and I reckon that for 23l of lager I need 200-220g of sugar in order to do a bulk priming. Would this figure be correct? Also would this be ok to do in about 200ml of water?

    Also what would you reccomend, bulk priming wise, for 15l of wheat beer?

    All this stuff is gonna go down in my little beer diary so i don't have to bother you kind folk again lol. :grin:

    =edit=
    Actually ignore the second question as the Berferm instructions, which the wheat beer is, give the amount of sugar needed in order to bulk prime.
     
  2. May 28, 2012 #2

    Peapodmaster

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    To prime a pint of beer in general it takes a 1/2 a tsp per pint. this is 2.5g (2.1g to be precise) per pint. 23l = 40pints. so 40 x 2.5g = 100g of sugar. i may be incorrect but I'm pretty sure thats right.. the instructions for the lager should have a general "per pint" amount of sugar to prime.

    Andy
     
  3. May 28, 2012 #3

    zgoda

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    4 grams per litre is mild carbonation, like in British ales. 8 grams is very fizzy weizen. For lager or other ales it would be something in between.
     
  4. May 28, 2012 #4

    critty

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    Just dug out the instructions for the lager kit, I keep losing them for some reason, and it says to disolve 60g of priming sugar, though everything and everyone says normal sugar is just fine lol, for the batch. Given what you both say this seems a little low. I am a little dubious on this brewmaker essential kit instructions anyway. So please guys put my mind at ease lol. Also I have a load of dextrose left over from something. Would that do that job?

    But obviously my calculations are way off from the looks of things lol.
     
  5. May 28, 2012 #5

    pittsy

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    for your lager i would do 200g for a 23l and wheat i would do around 120g for 23l so for 15l thats around 80g
     
  6. May 28, 2012 #6

    zgoda

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  7. May 28, 2012 #7

    lovelldr

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    I recently bottled 21l of better brew Czech pilsner, and used 190g for that. The 120g for 15l of the tarwebier was perfect in my opinion. Came out with nice head ... Had one Saturday night, yum yum.

    As for sugar, I feel that using dextrose over standard granulated has given the beer a little better carbonation. Might just be a lucky (type of brew used when used granulated, out want left long enough), but for the little extra in cost, I find it's negligible...
     
  8. May 28, 2012 #8

    Andyhull

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    Are you bottling or kegging?

    For 500ml bottles i put 1/2tsp for beer/ales, and for a lager i would put 1tsp per 500ml bottle.

    So for batch priming just multiply 1tsp for however many half litres you have, or weigh 1tsp and multiply that by your volume! 23ltr brew = 46 500mls x 1tsp = 46tsp of priming sugar or by weight.

    However, if your kegging 1tsp per 500ml will be too much and the keg will just vent off the extra gas to the pressure the PSV is set at.

    As for the dextrose, i would use that in your next brew, i use caster sugar to prime with personally and the brew still tastes fab.

    Andy
     
  9. May 28, 2012 #9

    Northern Brewer

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    I batch primed my strong IPA with 3g per litre as I dont like heavy carbonation. As it was my first batch secondary I've just checked it after a week at 20c - flat as a witches boob. Maybe its taking a while for the secondary as it is a very strong IPA, around 7.5% so will give it a another couple of weeks before passing final judgement however I think I have under done it. I think 5g per litre is probably about right for me, very similar to 2.5g/half a teaspoon per bottle.

    What to do with 140 bottles of flat 7.5% IPA? :hmm: :idea: :cheers: :drink: :drunk:
     
  10. May 28, 2012 #10

    critty

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    Thanks guys!

    Got work tonight so can't start the bottling process, bummer :( , but will start the process tomorrow. I am not fond of overly fizzy beers. So I am hoping that by bulk priming I can keep a level carbonation across the batch.

    ;)
     
  11. May 29, 2012 #11

    garylewis1966

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    My 2nd brew out of 4 was a coopers pilsner. I batch primed using 9g brewing sugar per litre. I wanted to make sure I had good carbonation and head, considering my 1st brew didn't have enough of either (due to capping problem). However, after 7 weeks since bottling, the lager is too fizzy with a huge head unless I leave it a minute before pouring into a glass carefully and even then is still too gassey. I don't know if this will change in time. I'll probably try 7 or 8g/lt in future.

    Let us know how you get on.
     
  12. May 29, 2012 #12

    critty

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    Will do. Not done the botteling today as I have just been far too tired to do anything. So will update peeps tomorrow. I don't like me beers to be too gassy, I tend to find brand beers like fosters too gassy, so I am going to carefully measure it.
     

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