Calling all Klarstein Owners.

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by Sadfield, Jan 31, 2018.

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  1. Mar 1, 2019 #81

    Madhouse

    Madhouse

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    Just put my order in! Looking forward to its inaugural brew, although I'm gonna have to work out a new profile on BeerSmith - any of you guys have an insight on boil-off rates and the amount of wort you lose below the tap.

    Also ordered the bits I need to get the brew-fridge running

    Next up, pipework and a tap connector for the cooling coil - any tips on pipe diameter? .... just looked back in this thread - 13mm.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
  2. Mar 9, 2019 #82

    Henders

    Henders

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    Hurrah! :)
    Boil-off, eh. Well I'm at a lovely 90m above sea level in the UK, and I have my profile set as losing 4.5L over an hour. Might be a tad less than that at the moment, either because of the cold (I forget physics) or because I got it wrong in the summer :D.

    Wort below the tap I've yet to actually measure. I tip the whole thing up when decanting so it's very minimal, maybe .5L at worst/best.

    The chiller was a pain. I did no-chill for a while just to avoid having to work out what to buy!
    I use whatever adapter my hose spray nozzle quick-releases onto. I'm hoping that means something!
    Next I use this hoselock threaded outdoor BSP thingy to connect to it.
    Next I use this 1/2 BSP Male Thread Pipe Fitting to 8mm Barb Hose Tail Connector to screw into the above and shove into some flexible tubing i had leftover with the right internal diameter. That also fits the chiller nicely.

    On the outlet I shove on another bit of that thin tubing and then aim it at some guttering i put leading outside :D. Eventually I'll buy some more connectors and chop a bit of hose and be laughing all the way to the water butt!
     
  3. Mar 11, 2019 #83

    Madhouse

    Madhouse

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    That’s quite a boil-off!! My pan was 1.9l/hr I thought it’d be more but that’s loads, no idea on my height from sea level either.

    Might just do a test and calculate it as part of the boiler shakedown. Not that boil-off’s a huge issue as I can always add more.

    Will leave kettle/trub loss at 1L for now and adjust when I’ve brewed a few times.

    Pipework for the chiller should be ok, although I can’t remember what tap we bought, so have taken a punt on the connector.

    The bigger issue than that is the new kitchen’s been a pain and we sent all the worktops back last week, so brewing’s still on hold.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2019 #84

    foxy

    foxy

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    It isn't so much as how much wort could one boil it is the mash which commands the limitations, I can mash a 23 litre batch using 'no sparge' method that is about its maximum. If you have beer smith or brewers friend set the efficiency between 65 and 70% .
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  5. Mar 14, 2019 #85

    Petrolhead

    Petrolhead

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    I have the basic Klarstein and love it having done about half a dozen brews. I have made up a dip stick which works well and use vinegar to soak of the burnt on wort. Another tip is to clean out the grain basket as the wort comes to the boil and it can then be used as a hop spider. Only partly successful for large volumes.

    I recently bought one of the cheap pumps off fleabay, less than £20, some irrigation fittings, 90 deg bends and Tees, from B&Q plus some half inch food grade clear pipe that I had kicking around. I made a loop with holes in to drop on the top of the grain basket and ran it back to the tap via the pump. Tested it on my last brew. At first the flow was too great so I simply used a G clamp on the outflow of the pump to regulate it and at that point it worked a treat. For the sparge I removed the pipe from the Klarstein tap and connected it to the outlet of the hot water tank I use. Again it worked a treat with a brewhouse efficiency into the 80's. The only small issue is the lack of visibility inside the Klarstein when the grain basket is sat on top of it.

    I have now bought some clips for the pipe which I intend riveting around the top of the grain basket to hold the tube and as I can see up inside the double skin when the base is reused I may even rivet some more up the side to take the vertical pipe but still allowing this pipe to be drawn through the clips so the grain basket can be raised for the sparge. I have also bought an in line tap to regulate the flow. I appreciate that a picture is worth a 1000 words so I will try to take some during this part of the build.

    I also have a couple of other projects which I am contemplating and any thoughts or pointers would be appreciated.

    I would like to fit a plug where the power flex enters the kettle which will allow me to disconnect the power lead, much like a kettle, when not in use. It can be stored in the kettle rather than hanging off the side and catching on everything.

    Also, the lack of vision inside the Klarstein when sparging is a bit of a pain as I sparge to the volume I require rather than work out what amount of sparge water is required. If I do the latter I need to fit a sight glass to my water heater which is fairly straight forward as it is single skinned and then do the calculations. However, I would like to fit a sight glass to the Klarstein which is double skinned. I could drill a hole through both skins and clamp them together with the sight glass fitting but this sounds a bit hit and miss. I think I need to take a washer, or two, that is the same thickness as the gap between the skins, bend them to the correct curve and then feed them into the cavity from below to correctly fit the sight glass. This sounds a bit of a fiddle especially as there is an indent at the base which could cause issues.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2019 #86

    Mark Nohr

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    So I pulled off the bottom finally and found the heater coil was stamped in big bold lettering 1800. I guess the heater coil itself is the limitation. Pretty disappointing. I've contacted Klarstein and requested a 220V option for the US (we do have those sockets conveniently in laundry rooms with sinks and ventilation).
     
  7. Mar 14, 2019 #87

    Mark Nohr

    Mark Nohr

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    While fly sparging how do I insure I do not overwash? There is not a convenient way to grab a sample of the sparge for testing.
     
  8. Mar 14, 2019 #88

    Petrolhead

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    Mark, the easiest way may be to use the tap to draw some liquid if you are using a trial jar. I just dip the wort and use my refractometer.
     
  9. Mar 15, 2019 #89

    Mark Nohr

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    Hmm. So, while there is this really nice ability to pull the grist up to drain, it rains directly into the 1st runnings and the 2nd running is not channeled nor accessible before it combines with the 1st running. Short of draining the hot 1st runnings to a 2nd vesssel (losing the heat), I was wondering if there was something I could buy that could be inserted between the basket and the brew kettle when fly sparging.
     

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