CAN BUBBLING FROM FERMENTATION BIN BE ANYTHING OTHER THAN FERMENTATION

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by ColinTalbot, Dec 3, 2019.

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  1. Dec 3, 2019 #1

    ColinTalbot

    ColinTalbot

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    I think the brew I am making is already fully fermented, after a long period, and it tastes as if it is.
    But there is still an occasional bubble being produced from the airlock.
    Does this mean it is still fermenting, or could there be another reason.
    I do not want to leave it any longer than necessary, and want to proceed to barrelling as soon as possible, and want to finish making the beer as soon as possible.
    n.b. I notice that the occasional bubbling of which I speak occurs only when I raise the temperature.
    I should add that I do not have a hydrometer, and have no way of acquiring one within a reasonable amount of time.
     
  2. Dec 3, 2019 #2

    ColinTalbot

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    To add to my post and query half an hour ago, the bubbling I mention occurs when I disturb the bin, or press on its lid, or increase the temperature. Otherwise, there is no bubbling evident, even when I wait fifteen minutes for any sign of bubbling.
     
  3. Dec 3, 2019 #3

    ColinTalbot

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    To add to my post/query again, I suppose the question is whether the bubbling is the release of CO2 from a brew which is still fermenting, or is it just air escaping.
     
  4. Dec 3, 2019 #4

    davidfromUS

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    With no hydrometer but correct pitching and fermentation temperature, if you wait two-three weeks before packaging you should be okay. In other words, it is more than likely finished fermenting. As you pointed out, temperature changes and pressing on the lid will cause bubbles.
     
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  5. Dec 3, 2019 #5

    Banbeer

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    Hi Colin, if you press the lid then it will bubble, if you move it it will bubble as on both occasions you're pushing the co2 out shouldn't bubble if you raise the temp if it has finished fermenting, your best bet is buy a hydrometer to know for sure.
     
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  6. Dec 3, 2019 #6

    Burtie

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    If you're thinking of brewing more, I'd certainly invest in a hydrometer especially if you want to avoid 'bottle bombs'..

    And, yes, afaik, bubbling can be caused by the release of CO2/gas currently trapped and not an indication of continued fermentation.
     
  7. Dec 3, 2019 #7

    Alastair70

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  8. Dec 3, 2019 #8

    Burtie

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  9. Dec 3, 2019 #9

    An Ankoù

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    Hi Colin. Welcome to the forum.
    Get a hydrometer.
     
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  10. Dec 3, 2019 #10

    ColinTalbot

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    Thanks, but I don't want to wait more than one day, preferably less.
     
  11. Dec 3, 2019 #11

    ColinTalbot

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    many thanks
     
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  12. Dec 3, 2019 #12

    ColinTalbot

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    Thanks. I don't actually use bottles. I drink from the barrel.
     
  13. Dec 3, 2019 #13

    ColinTalbot

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  14. Dec 3, 2019 #14

    ColinTalbot

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  15. Dec 3, 2019 #15

    Drunkula

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    If you don't pick one up cheaply from Wilko's then get a single scale one, specific gravity. The multi-scale ones are a menace.
     
  16. Dec 3, 2019 #16

    terrym

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    Why in such a rush? One aspect of homebrewing is learning to be patient. What's a day or three matter in the overall cycle of brewing beer from pitching the yeast to drinking a properly conditioned beer?
    And buy a hydrometer as others have said. You can brew without it, but if you use one properly it takes nearly all the guesswork out of things.
     
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  17. Dec 4, 2019 #17

    davidfromUS

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    To clarify, two weeks from adding the yeast and not two weeks from this point.
     
  18. Dec 4, 2019 #18

    An Ankoù

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    Hi Colin. What kind of barrels do you use? You might be able to go ahead since most pressure barrels are fitted with a pressure release valve of some sort.
     
  19. Dec 4, 2019 #19

    Cwrw666

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    I know this is standard advice but for many many years I've taken a hydrometer reading at the beginning and end of fermentation and the only benefit has been that I can calculate the ABV. Basically you can see when it's finished - the beer looks `dead' and will be clearing from the top down.
    If you have any doubts at all stick it in a pressure barrel as they all come with pressure relief valves.
     
  20. Dec 4, 2019 #20

    terrym

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    I suppose I could have gone without a hydrometer, since I agree that you can usually see when its finished, but I think that judgement call does come with experience which anyone starting out doesn't have. But for less than a fiver a hydrometer takes the guesswork out of it, although personally I am not too fussed about a highly accurate reading (e.g. whether the SG its 1.010 or 1.009) nor the ABV, I just like to know roughly what's going on. And certainly taking a reading is not a big thing, I just drop a sanitised hydrometer into the wort/beer in the FV. My hydrometer did, however, come into its own when I did kits and a few stuck , especially a Wherry (do Wherries still do that?), and if I hadn't had the hydrometer I wouldn't have known that.
    And as I have said elsewhere relying on the rubber band RV which protects most plastic PBs is something I never had any faith in at all.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019

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