Can we be a little more accepting of our differences?

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I have received a lot of helpful advice, both directly and indirectly, on this forum over the past 18 months or so, and I owe a lot to my fellow members for this. It really has helped me out as I have got stuck in to my homebrewing.
I am trying to not be critical of others in the way this comes across - hopefully it shall be taken as wel-meaningl and not upset anyone.

It may be that what I am seeing has always happened (in fact, I am sure it has), but I am just noticing it more. A real bugbear of mine of late has been other people dismissing the experience and preferences of others as though what they're doing is pointless, daft, or a waste of money (or indeed all three). We all brew in different ways, on different budgets, using different equipment for reasons that suit us as individual brewers. Particularly when it comes to new brewers, I feel we have a duty not to simply imply our way is best and everyone else is silly, but to provide information which can be used by the person inquiring to make the choice that fits their requirements profile (as in, time, space, budget, desired result). I have found myself of late feeling like if I even mention I just bought a Brewzilla, that I have to justify my reason for it before someone comes back and says something along the lines of "What a waste of money, my setup cost £50 and I make great beer". The same goes for process preferences. For example, some use liquid yeast and love it, some prefer dry for different reasons. Some like to whirlpool, others don't. Some use tap water, some bottled, some RO.
Some like to bottle exclusively, others like to spend more on kegging? Great, you may have bottled for 30 years and always had great beer. If someone else wants to spend £300 on a keg set-up (I know, I know, it'll always end up more than £300 by the time you've bought 10 more kegs, a maxicooler, a gold-plated beer font...), let them do it, and let them enjoy it without being dismissive of it.

When I was first trained as a software tester, the first thing to learn is that it was not my job to say "this product is not good enough" or "this cannot be released" or "it's rubbish", rather my role was to provide information so that those who needed to make the decision could do so with the information I had provided them.
Similarly in life more generally, some people tend to spend all their money on cars. To me, buying a car is like buying toilet paper - I do it because I have to and I don't get excited by it. That said, just because I am not in to cars, I can see why some poeple are, and why they like to spend their money on them. I don't poo-poo them for it just because I am happy with my £700 '07 plate Vauxhall Astra that gets me from one place to another in a way that suits me.

So in summary, can we please be understanding of our differences and not make eachother out to be weird just because we are all different? (<--Whilst I am talking there about homebrewing, perhaps apply to life too.)
 

RichardM

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I have received a lot of helpful advice, both directly and indirectly, on this forum over the past 18 months or so, and I owe a lot to my fellow members for this. It really has helped me out as I have got stuck in to my homebrewing.
I am trying to not be critical of others in the way this comes across - hopefully it shall be taken as wel-meaningl and not upset anyone.

It may be that what I am seeing has always happened (in fact, I am sure it has), but I am just noticing it more. A real bugbear of mine of late has been other people dismissing the experience and preferences of others as though what they're doing is pointless, daft, or a waste of money (or indeed all three). We all brew in different ways, on different budgets, using different equipment for reasons that suit us as individual brewers. Particularly when it comes to new brewers, I feel we have a duty not to simply imply our way is best and everyone else is silly, but to provide information which can be used by the person inquiring to make the choice that fits their requirements profile (as in, time, space, budget, desired result). I have found myself of late feeling like if I even mention I just bought a Brewzilla, that I have to justify my reason for it before someone comes back and says something along the lines of "What a waste of money, my setup cost £50 and I make great beer". The same goes for process preferences. For example, some use liquid yeast and love it, some prefer dry for different reasons. Some like to whirlpool, others don't. Some use tap water, some bottled, some RO.
Some like to bottle exclusively, others like to spend more on kegging? Great, you may have bottled for 30 years and always had great beer. If someone else wants to spend £300 on a keg set-up (I know, I know, it'll always end up more than £300 by the time you've bought 10 more kegs, a maxicooler, a gold-plated beer font...), let them do it, and let them enjoy it without being dismissive of it.

When I was first trained as a software tester, the first thing to learn is that it was not my job to say "this product is not good enough" or "this cannot be released" or "it's rubbish", rather my role was to provide information so that those who needed to make the decision could do so with the information I had provided them.
Similarly in life more generally, some people tend to spend all their money on cars. To me, buying a car is like buying toilet paper - I do it because I have to and I don't get excited by it. That said, just because I am not in to cars, I can see why some poeple are, and why they like to spend their money on them. I don't poo-poo them for it just because I am happy with my £700 '07 plate Vauxhall Astra that gets me from one place to another in a way that suits me.

So in summary, can we please be understanding of our differences and not make eachother out to be weird just because we are all different? (<--Whilst I am talking there about homebrewing, perhaps apply to life too.)
When I worked as a software tester it was very much my place to say "this software can't be released" if it wasn't good enough.
 

darkbright

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I broadly agree with you. As you would expect in life and on any internet forum, the majority of people are reasonable, respectful people who can have a good discussion without feeling the need to do others down.

I spend a fair bit of money on my brewing set up, I'm lucky in a sense that I can afford it and it's my main hobby besides photography. However, I certainly will not critisie anyone else's choice to spend their hard earned money - whether that be a kit brewer or a massive 3 vessel system (or anything in between).

I try to remember that we all come from differnt walks of life and have differing needs, wants and pleasures. Each to their own.
 

Clint

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I think this has been discussed before. I agree there is no place for snobbery or putting people down.
I don't think any malice is intended but when asking advice anyone should expect every type of reply...as,like you say,we all do it differently, on different budgets.
I brew AG having progressed from kits. Is it better? Time wise definitely no! Beer wise definitely yes! But then..I never made a kit I couldn't drink. So you could say if time was a crucial factor I would probably be better off brewing kits...and you'd be right!
When embarking on a new hobby or expanding into newer areas I like info. and read anything and everything, ask lots of questions and often make the wrong decisions along the way. The info you get is a mixture of people experience, opinion or both. It's up to us to weed out what works for us personally.
 

Clint

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OP states it wasn't his place to say it's rubbish..etc
 

Alan_Reginato

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I just don't want to understand people who say "it's expensive, so it's better" somehow. Usually what they mean is "I spent a lot of money on this so I need it to be better".
But respect is imperative, so I just don't reply.
 

Tanglefoot

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The trouble with posting on a forum is that it's easy to misread someone's tone.
Equally your own comments can be perceived the wrong way.
I ignored what I took to be a slightly sarky comment recently ( yes I chill my Proper Job 😄 )
just thinking to myself 'what a knobhead'.
The good advice and community spirit far outweighs any spikiness you may encounter in my view.
 

The Cat

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Agree, but saying that this forum is better behaved than some others.

Just mentioning you have a Tilt hydrometer on some forums usually starts the ball rolling.
Agreed this place is very calm compared to most others I am on.

Smell my pressure barrels you muthas!
 

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