Citra Pale Ale

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Dave 666

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Lots of people 'no chill'
Hmm, is there certain conditions, process or equipment required for this I wonder?. As surely it can't just be as simple as transferring wort to the FV at flame out, sticking the lid on and waiting overnight to pitch the yeast at room temp the next day?.
 

thewelshwizard1

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I've always used a wort chiller, and it works efficiently with no issues for me.
 

Dave 666

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I've always used a wort chiller, and it works efficiently with no issues for me.
Forgive my ignorance & lack of knowledge in this area as never gave cooling much attention beyond iced water. But in looking on eBay & Amazon etc, all I can find are the copper coils for wort cooling\chilling there is assumingly a cooling source or device to power the cooling process?. If so what are they called or should I be looking at?.
 

Hengoedbrewer

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Forgive my ignorance & lack of knowledge in this area as never gave cooling much attention beyond iced water. But in looking on eBay & Amazon etc, all I can find are the copper coils for wort cooling\chilling there is assumingly a cooling source or device to power the cooling process?. If so what are they called or should I be looking at?.
You attach the chiller to your tap and run cold water through them to cool your wort. I don't actually have one (I wanted one but can't justify it being on a water meter!) but that's how they work. It's a heat transfer device basically.
 

cushyno

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Hmm, is there certain conditions, process or equipment required for this I wonder?. As surely it can't just be as simple as transferring wort to the FV at flame out, sticking the lid on and waiting overnight to pitch the yeast at room temp the next day?.
The no chill method makes use of a plastic Jerry can that is filled with the almost boiling wort to sterilise it. When filled all air squeezed out before the cap is put on with no air trapped inside. Zero air gives no oxidation, and prevents awful things like botulism, so I believe.

Google "no chill cube".

The cube is left to cool overnight.
 

GerritT

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Hmm, is there certain conditions, process or equipment required for this I wonder?. As surely it can't just be as simple as transferring wort to the FV at flame out, sticking the lid on and waiting overnight to pitch the yeast at room temp the next day?.
Yes, very correct. I leave it for a few hours outsido to get the temps below 80° for the flameoff hops, and pitch in the (course of the) morning.
 

decanter2020

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Crap, forgot to come back with impressions. We kicked the keg of this last week, it was a hit. Stuck with all Citra, will try the amarillo next time. Checked my logbook, and fwiw mashed in for 60 at 151 degrees.
 

moto748

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surely it can't just be as simple as transferring wort to the FV at flame out, sticking the lid on and waiting overnight to pitch the yeast at room temp the next day?.
it is for me. That is what I have always done, and never had any probs doing it.
 

Pavalijo

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I’m gearing up to do this as my first AG in the next couple of weeks (when the Golden Stagg finishes in the FV).
Please can I seek advice on the following:

1. At some point I will learn about water treatment, but until then - can I add anything to Tesco Ashbeck to better suit this style?

2. I think I’ve got the mashing and sparging temperatures and technique in my head - but do I add protofloc during the boil (how much and when?)

3. I would like to do a 15 litre batch (I share with my son) but only have a 20 litre pot and a 10 litre pot. Can I mash in the larger pot and use the smaller pot to collect sparge water, then start the boil with all wort plus some sparge water and top up with the rest of the heated sparge water as I go, keeping the additional sparge at simmering point and adding slowly so as not to stop the rolling boil?

4. and when the boil is finished and cooled in iced water in the sink do I strain it through a filter bag (I am thinking sterilised Sainsbury’s veg bag) into the fermenter? Then aerate and pitch.

Thanks in advance
 

MmmBeer

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I’m gearing up to do this as my first AG in the next couple of weeks (when the Golden Stagg finishes in the FV).
Please can I seek advice on the following:

1. At some point I will learn about water treatment, but until then - can I add anything to Tesco Ashbeck to better suit this style?

2. I think I’ve got the mashing and sparging temperatures and technique in my head - but do I add protofloc during the boil (how much and when?)

3. I would like to do a 15 litre batch (I share with my son) but only have a 20 litre pot and a 10 litre pot. Can I mash in the larger pot and use the smaller pot to collect sparge water, then start the boil with all wort plus some sparge water and top up with the rest of the heated sparge water as I go, keeping the additional sparge at simmering point and adding slowly so as not to stop the rolling boil?

4. and when the boil is finished and cooled in iced water in the sink do I strain it through a filter bag (I am thinking sterilised Sainsbury’s veg bag) into the fermenter? Then aerate and pitch.

Thanks in advance
1 As its a hop driven beer some Gypsum (calcium sulphate) would help bring out the hoppiness, but is not essential. I would need to do some sums and look up Ashbeck's stats, but I would imagine somewhere in the region of 0.5 - 0.75 g gypsum per litre.

2 Add protofloc 10- 15 minutes before the end of the boil, for 15 litres only about a third of a tablet is needed.

3 The method I used when I started AG was mash grain in large pot, strain wort into FV, add sparge water @ 75-80°C to pot with grains for 10 mins, strain the weaker sparged wort into FV, dispose of grains, add all wort back into large pot and bring to the boil. It became much easier when I went to BIAB and bought a mashing and sparging bag.

4 Yes you could strain the hops out like this, drop it in a pan of boiling water for 5 minutes to sterilise it first. A tip from my first AG brew use just cold tap water for the first two sinkfulls of cooling water, reserve the ice for the last one, when you need the extra cooling oomph.
 

Pavalijo

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Thanks for the detailed reply, very helpful. I am intending to buy a bag for mashing and sparging.
Is there any problem with adding some of the sparse water as the wort evaporates? I so I might have to reduce the batch size.
 

MmmBeer

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If you are making a 15 litre batch, the pre-boil volume should (just about) fit in a 20 litre pot. It is ok to hold back some of the spargings and add these to the kettle during the boil, but I would do this early in the boil, to ensure it all has time to get sterilised and properly prepared for the yeast.
 

moto748

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I looked at this recipe back in May, but I never did get round to doing it. I have all the ingredients, so I'll have a go tomorrow.
 

Donegal john

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Hmm, in the past doing all grain brewing I was always under the impression that at flame out its important to cool the wort as quickly as possible to pitch temp?. But seriously, to leave overnight?.
No chill is a tried and tested method for some
I’ve done it once
 

Rodcx500z

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I have 2 immersion chillers and still no chill more so this time of year, i did a brew this morning it is now in free fall
 

Donegal john

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I have 2 immersion chillers and still no chill more so this time of year, i did a brew this morning it is now in free fall
I’m increasingly interested in doing it rod as the biggest pain for me when brewing is chilling with the copper chiller as I brew in the shed and have to run the hose out and hook up etc. I have had the hose pop off during chilling and made a mess in the garage.
I must look into it more. 👍
 

Rodcx500z

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I’m increasingly interested in doing it rod as the biggest pain for me when brewing is chilling with the copper chiller as I brew in the shed and have to run the hose out and hook up etc. I have had the hose pop off during chilling and made a mess in the garage.
I must look into it more. 👍
Hi John, all i do is turn the kettle off put the lid on and cover the hole with some tin foil then i just leave it to settle while i clean up, then drain into the fermenter and again foil in the airlock hole or bung you can get suck back through the airlock when you can touch with you hand usually a couple of hours put the airlock in pitch your yeast the following day, this works for me because i brew mainly bitter and pale ales
 

Donegal john

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Hi John, all i do is turn the kettle off put the lid on and cover the hole with some tin foil then i just leave it to settle while i clean up, then drain into the fermenter and again foil in the airlock hole or bung you can get suck back through the airlock when you can touch with you hand usually a couple of hours put the airlock in pitch your yeast the following day, this works for me because i brew mainly bitter and pale ales
Never any issues with oxidation ? Or infection ?
I ask when I know you don’t lol cause your beers look great.
Cheers rod
 

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