Cloudwater and hazy ddh neipa beers

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Hello
I'm looking for some good recipes that would be similar to a cloudwater hazy ddh. Just had a northern monk colab that was beautiful, pictures attached. Relatively new to the full mash set up but happy to give anything a go.
Thanks in advance
 

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I'm looking for some good recipes that would be similar to a cloudwater hazy ddh.

Be aware that those kinds of beers are some of the most challenging of all to brew well, certainly to Cloudwater standard - and they have the help of centrifuges and other hardware that aren't readily available to homebrewers. They're a constant battle against oxidation.

But Cloudwater have published recipes of the original DIPA v3 and its 2018 revival, which should give you some ideas :

Also Braufessor's NEIPA is a good place for homebrewers to start :
 

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Was gonna try something like this.
Generally not too worried about oxidation at the moment. Have a pretty closed system and some methods for dry hopping that I think will work well.
 

hoppyscotty

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Don’t even attempt unless you can keep away from oxygen. You’re wasting expensive ingredients. After many attempts at a really hoppy and aromatic neipa and mostly failed attempts for a number of reasons. I have just had success with a verdant even sharks need water clone, but took a lot of attention to detail. Firstly water chemistry, more important on these style of beers for mouthfeel and accentuation of hop flavour and aroma. Also I did a 100% O2 free process. So got a fermzilla and close transfers onto hops in a keg for dry hopping then transferred off the hops into another keg once contact time of the hops was done for serving so no more than 3 days contact time on the dry hops so zero exposure to air in all that process. Hops pushed up to over 16g/litre in the dry hop and chlorides pushed upto 250ppm…brewfather normally comes up with about 2.5 g of chloride for a hoppy beer at 2:1 chloride to sulphite ratio with my tap water profile, it required nearly 9g of chloride to make 250ppm. And of course managing ph through the mash. Results were stunning though. Aroma that hit you as soon as you started to pour the beer, a nice fluffy head that remained and a really soft pillowy mouthfeel and juicy flavour.The one and only time I felt I’ve nailed a proper NEIPA. A lot of attention to detail and held up pretty well compared to the original so you can achieve near pro brewery results at homebrew level, just requires a lot of attention to detail.
 

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Yes yes. Brilliant.
I've got a fermentersaurus v1 so can ferment fully closed. Was also gonna get a fermzilla and use one as a bright tank/fermenter/ hop keg.. I've got gas to top back up and 3 kegs and I'm feeling brave.
Read all the stuff in the cloudwater link that northern brewer put up and think I understood it mostly.
Was reading radical beer the other day and he said minimum water should be filtered so might get one of these and do the additions that you and cloudwater suggest. Did do water additions last brew and definitely already added body to the flavour.
As I said still learning but have recently dialled in some issues I'd had previously and ready for a challenge.
Bring it on!!!!
 

hoppyscotty

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Think the main reason for filtering is to get any crud from pipes out and get rid of chlorine. A campden tablet takes care of the latter and for most uk domestic supplies I can’t imagine crud from the mains pipe work being an issue unless you’re out on the sticks and still running off old cast iron pipes or something. I think I’ll end up getting a filter/RO set up eventually just to get that complete control over my water but it’s a kind of last few percent thing if you have a half decent mains supply in the first place. That’s what I take from it anyway.
 

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Yeah. My waters pretty good here. But the filters are so cheap now that it's not really a massive outlay. Wouldn't be sure how to change water additions though.
 

hoppyscotty

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If you use Brewfather and have a decent report from your local water supplier then you can easily get the additions from Brewfather. My water is pretty good for IPA's so very few additions needed normally but for Stouts its too hard and zero additions are called up by Brewfather, so RO water would be better for stouts with my tap water profile. I appreciate the water varies from month to month or week to week an a report from your water authority is only an annual average, but looking over the last three years reports from my water company the variation is quite small and the change to the additions is tiny so the supply seems to be reasonably stable...probably within any tolerance that you'd not notice.

But fair enough on the filters if they're cheap enough. Try pushing your chlorides upto the 230ppm like I did. Feels like a much higher level than would normally be called for by Brewfather but it really did work with my Verdant clone.
 

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