Co-Pitching Philly Sour and Wallonia

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I want to brew 2 beers from a common base. The base would be a American Wheat beer to 22 litres, mashed, hopped , boiled and chilled. Then I would split into a 12 litres cherry beer and a 10 litre raspberry beer. The two yeasts I want to use are Philly Sour and Wallonia. Can I pitch half a packet of each into both beers. If not the Philly goes to the raspberry and the Wallonia to the cherry. When primary fermentation is complete the relevant frozen fruit would be added to the secondaries and left for 7 days.
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jceg316

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The things to look out for when co-pitching yeasts is what temperature to ferment and lag phase. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but Wallonia is a single strain sacch with farmhouse qualities?

If so, co pitching shouldn't be an issue. Doing a quick google shows they both require similar fermentation temperatures, but not sure on lag time for either. Ideally they would be pitched so the one with longer lag time gets a head start. It gets a bit more complicated if there's a yeast blend with multiple strains.

In terms of splitting the packets, I don't see why not, as long as the pitch rate is the same. It might be a good idea to measure out the yeast before pitching so you know you're getting half of each yeast in each fermenter. I'm quite lazy and would definitely eyeball it then complain my beer didn't come out well :laugh8: .

Sounds like really good beers btw, good luck with them!
 
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Thanks
I co-pitched yesterday into a cherry wheatbeer and a raspberry wheatbeer and both are now fermenting away. In hindsight I should have co-pitched into a single fermenter and split into the two secondaries.
 

clib

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From lallemand website FAQ:

– Co-pitching with small amounts of another brewing strain will reduce the amount of lactic acid produced due to competition for sugars (in the lab, 10% Nottingham cut the lactic acid level by about 50%).
 

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