Co-Pitching two dried yeasts

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Scottyburto

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I wasn't planning on adding priming sugar, I was hoping it would break down some of the sugar the ale yeast left unfermented. But if wine yeast only tackles simple sugar it would be pointless and I'd just have flat beer. šŸ¤Ø
 

Wiener Blut

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So I pitched the Windsor about 36h ago at the higher end of its recommended temperature range and it's been bubbling away vigorously. (Although I forgot how tame the KrƤusen can be after a few brews with Verdant!)

Gravity went from 1048 to 1030 within 24h and to 1016 just now. I decided to add the Notty now with some fermentable sugars remaining. Target FG is 1010.

Already the beer has a very nice aroma: malty and fruity, with a definite wiff of red apple. Almost rosey, but that might be the hops. Anyway definitely the characteristics I was looking for. So if the Notty can work it's magic now and dry it out a bit and help it clear, I'll be very happy.
 

UKSkydiver

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I pitched half a packet of S04 and half a packet of MJ M15 Empire Ale in a milk stout. Only a half batch (11 litres), but over 1050 so decided to double up.

My only 'research' was knowing that S04 is a general ale yeast and M15 is suitable for sweet stouts and that I happened to have two half packets in the fridge.

Fermented at 18.5c for a week, 19.5 for (nearly) a week and 21 for a couple of days to finish it off.

OG 1074
FG 1022
ABV 6.8%

As far as I can tell the attenuation on that works out to ~ 69%

I can't attest to the results yet as it's still conditioning - but I am very much looking forward to trying this out.
 

grooves

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Really? I want to believe you and it would be great if that were so. Can you point me in the direction of any documentation on this. Thanks.
I first heard about the combination of the "same" base malts on a Brewing Network podcast - I think it was one of the Brew Strong ones with Jamil.

I did try it out on a couple of brews when I was using up some bits & bobs and it seemed to work out. Nowadays I order exactly what I need for each brew and haven't thought about it for a while. Give it a go - if you are looking for a drier beer you've got nothing to lose using a combo of malt.
 
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Sadfield

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Really? I want to believe you and it would be great if that were so. Can you point me in the direction of any documentation on this. Thanks.
This is interesting and would love some more info. I'm currently fermenting a Duvel Citra clone for a homebrew club challenge, so have done a fair bit of research in Duvel to formulate a recipe. They use Pilsner from four suppliers, which I put down to perhaps being for consistency over harvests or just more complexity from the grist. However, they also get apparent attenuation at around 90%, which is high, perhaps even for step mashing and a good dollop of Dextrose (20%). Or, I'm adding 2+2 and getting something extra.
 

UKSkydiver

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An AnkoĆ¹ said:
Really? I want to believe you and it would be great if that were so. Can you point me in the direction of any documentation on this. Thanks.
I first heard about the combination of the "same" base malts on a Brewing Network podcast - I think it was one of the Brew Strong ones with Jamil.
Not sure if this is exactly what youre referring to, but in this article, it talks about base malts providing enzymes for speciality malts to convert starches that don't have their own.

That said, it also says that base malts have tons of enzymes left over to help other malts convert their starches.

I know I've said the same thing twice with different words, bear with me. So whilst it sounds llike using different base malts could improve attenuation - it sounds like (becasue base malts have loads of enzymes left over) using a blend of only base malts won't make that much difference (as there are loads left over anyway, so no need to blend) if that makes sense.

(sorry - I'm getting a bit geeky)
 

Wiener Blut

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So the bitter I brewed finished at 1012, which gives me 74% attenuation. A little higher than I wanted but ok. Still has a very nice aroma and tastes nice already.

But it was still very yeasty at bottling, so I don't know how much the Notty actually helped the Windsor settle out. I hope it will clear in the bottles.
 

Eramik

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Have brewed a Burton Ale (dark old style) that first got pitched with Windsor and a pack of Nottingham a couple days later. After 2 weeks, SG is still at 1,020 from 1,060, att 66%. I've shaken the fermentor a slightly, hoping to awake some life into the yeast. Had hoped Nottingham could pull down FG even further.

Would adding a hand of sugar and a packet of Nottingham, help re-start fermentation?
 

RoomWithABrew

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I found that the Windsor the one time I used it took ages. I think it needs a good rousing someone said and correct temp.
Only cleared in the barrel after about 6 weeks in the cool, normally the bitters drop clear in much less time.
The few that I bottled at the same time as going into barrel are all hopelessly overcarbed due to the ongoing ferment, have to get the bottle to near zero to pour it otherwise just get a gusher.
I'd just rouse and wait for it to get it's second wind, it is warm enough?
 

Eramik

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I found that the Windsor the one time I used it took ages. I think it needs a good rousing someone said and correct temp.
Only cleared in the barrel after about 6 weeks in the cool, normally the bitters drop clear in much less time.
The few that I bottled at the same time as going into barrel are all hopelessly overcarbed due to the ongoing ferment, have to get the bottle to near zero to pour it otherwise just get a gusher.
I'd just rouse and wait for it to get it's second wind, it is warm enough?
I've just raised temperature from 17 to 20.

I'll check in a week or two. Btw I was wrong it haven't fermented for 2 weeks. Just over a week šŸ„³. I'll definitely leave it, and hopefully let it work some magic.
 

RoomWithABrew

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Patience then, a week or so at 20 and then could let it cool on it's own. I would fine Windsor If I had to use it again.
Interesting Co ferment discuss on the David Heath Homebrew channel.
 

Eramik

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Patience then, a week or so at 20 and then could let it cool on it's own. I would fine Windsor If I had to use it again.
Interesting Co ferment discuss on the David Heath Homebrew channel.
Too much brewing lately, hard to keep the overview šŸ˜. I brewed a Golden ale this weekend which had gone from 1.044 to 1.022. they share heatbelt so increased temperature would be alright for them both.

I'll leave 'em until the weekend and check. If SG is close to expected finish I'll go back to 17.
 

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