Coffee

The Homebrew Forum

Help Support The Homebrew Forum:

Agentgonzo

Landlord.
Joined
Aug 23, 2021
Messages
787
Reaction score
848
Don’t know - but that was what we used in Saudi Arabia to get the scale off two Reverse Osmosis plants!

I’ve used it ever since on a variety of kettles, coffee makers and mesh filters. Left overnight it does the business!
:hat:

PS
Only yesterday I bought a litre of Malt Vinegar in Lidl but failed to find the Lemon Juice! According to the lad at the checkout (&FYI) it is in the “Home Baking” section! athumb..
Any acid will do the job to a greater or lesser extent. I've always shied away from using vinegar because I don't want any lingering taste to affect the coffee. I use food grade citric acid in rotation with the 'approved cleaners' because it's far cheaper, but apparently 'creates its own build up' (no more details given, so I'm a bit skeptical).

I've also heard 'dangers' about certain descalers being 'bad' for the seals/mechanicsms in espresso machines, so I'm a bit cautious about a variety of cleaners.
 

Braufather

Landlord.
Joined
Aug 23, 2016
Messages
1,571
Reaction score
545
Location
NULL
What temperature are you heating your milk to. Anything above 65C will remove any sweetness from the milk and make the whole drink more likely to taste bitter
I saw that somewhere and my last try heated it to 65c ( magic number that isn’t it) it was better but still lacked that creaminess you get at Neros or Costa
 

Agentgonzo

Landlord.
Joined
Aug 23, 2021
Messages
787
Reaction score
848
I saw that somewhere and my last try heated it to 65c ( magic number that isn’t it) it was better but still lacked that creaminess you get at Neros or Costa
Full fat or semi skimmed milk? I find the freshness of the milk also affects the creaminess
 

Session

Regular.
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
337
Reaction score
248
I have a relatively expensive espresso machine, and the manufacturer advised only using citric acid when descaling as it is the only product which they can guarantee will not damage the internals.

For creamy milk, it is partly about the milk you use (fresh & whole milk is best), and partly about getting good milk texture. The incorporation of tiny bubbles to form microfoam is what gives the creaminess, as well as not heating past 65’C.
 
Last edited:

Agentgonzo

Landlord.
Joined
Aug 23, 2021
Messages
787
Reaction score
848
I have a relatively expensive espresso machine, and the manufacturer advised only using citric acid as a descale as it is the only product which they can guarantee will not damage the internals.
Which one? I have a Jura, which wants you to use their own really expensive tablets. I use citric acid, so this makes me less worried about using it as a replacement for the Jura tabs. :👍
 

Session

Regular.
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
337
Reaction score
248
Which one? I have a Jura, which wants you to use their own really expensive tablets. I use citric acid, so this makes me less worried about using it as a replacement for the Jura tabs. :👍
I’ve got a DE1 by Decent Espresso, which is very fun but a silly amount to spend on an espresso machine. I drive a rubbish car though so this is how I justify it! Juras are good machines - nice to have something you can walk up to bleary-eyed and get deliciousness out of.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2017
Messages
2,993
Reaction score
1,868
Location
Detroit, MI
I use whole milk and whip it good. Just get it warm and it'll foam nicely. Not even that much work. The milk keeps its sweetness.
1654720421940.png
 

An Ankoù

Landlord.
Joined
Feb 2, 2019
Messages
6,825
Reaction score
5,733
Location
Brittany, France
Don’t know - but that was what we used in Saudi Arabia to get the scale off two Reverse Osmosis plants!

I’ve used it ever since on a variety of kettles, coffee makers and mesh filters. Left overnight it does the business!
:hat:

PS
Only yesterday I bought a litre of Malt Vinegar in Lidl but failed to find the Lemon Juice! According to the lad at the checkout (&FYI) it is in the “Home Baking” section! athumb..
It's in the produce area, Dutto. It comes in lemons.
 

TonyT

Regular.
Joined
Jun 23, 2020
Messages
310
Reaction score
427
Location
Narberth.
Don’t know - but that was what we used in Saudi Arabia to get the scale off two Reverse Osmosis plants!

I’ve used it ever since on a variety of kettles, coffee makers and mesh filters. Left overnight it does the business!
:hat:

PS
Only yesterday I bought a litre of Malt Vinegar in Lidl but failed to find the Lemon Juice! According to the lad at the checkout (&FYI) it is in the “Home Baking” section! athumb..
Given that it’s Lidl, quite likely you’ll find it in between the spot welders and the sanitary towels.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
42,098
Reaction score
13,806
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
It may “work fast”, but I’ll bet it costs much more than a litre of Malt Vinegar (aka Acetic Acid)!

Google brought this up when i searched -

Never use vinegar or acetic acid-based descalers, these can harm your machine and the taste of your drinks.
To descale, take two of the tablets and dissolve in water in the water tank.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
42,098
Reaction score
13,806
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.

Having read this i think i will stick to the Oust lactic acid descaler -

Proper descaling with lactic acid

A premium and food safe way to ensure the proper descaling of your coffee machine is using a lactic acid based descaling solution. Lactic acid is used in many detergents and soaps due to its natural antibacterial properties. Lactic acid effectively removes limescale build-up from a coffee machine’s internals, while leaving little to no residue behind. It is also very effective in the removal of rust.

Can I use vinegar to descale my coffee machine?

Some articles likely mention using common household vinegar to descale, which unfortunately does not turn out to be very effective. Vinegar is very weak and mild acid which is not effective to remove limescale or rust. Plus, you run the risk of leaving a vinegar taste in your machine. Vinegar has a potent smell which can take ages to get out of the pipes of your machine. And coffee and vinegar taste is not a good combination for your next cup.

 
Joined
Jan 13, 2016
Messages
8,428
Reaction score
5,332
Location
Sleaford - Lincolnshire
….. To descale, take two of the tablets and dissolve in water in the water tank.
May I ask when did we start to believe manufacturers who recommend their own product?

Also, I take it that “take TWO of the tablets” came from the manufacturer; either of the machine or of the tablet.

Then:
  • If so, why didn’t they make the tablets twice as big?
  • If not, on what evidence does the Author of the article base his findings on?
I will still lay money on the price of the tablets being much higher than a litre of vinegar and a bottle of lemon juice!
:hat:
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
42,098
Reaction score
13,806
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
May I ask when did we start to believe manufacturers who recommend their own product?

I have never used the Tassimo descaler tablets i searched for an alternative and the OUST descaler i posted about earlier ticked all the boxes.



We use this from Tesco to descale our Tassimo there are 3 sachets in the box,

1654690616140.png





Oust All Purpose Descaler​

Quick and easy limescale removal
Specially formulated to work quickly and easily to restore small household appliances to their best in just 10 minutes; its super-fast action is ideal for use in kettles, coffee machines, steam irons and shower heads.
  • Removes tough limescale
  • Results in just 10 minutes!
  • Helps prolong appliance life and restore good as new shine to appliances.
  • 3 treatment sachets suitable for kettles, irons, coffee machines and shower heads
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
42,098
Reaction score
13,806
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.

I will still lay money on the price of the tablets being much higher than a litre of vinegar and a bottle of lemon juice!

As i said (below) I don't use the Tassimo tablets but it states below that "Some articles likely mention using common household vinegar to descale, which unfortunately does not turn out to be very effective" so i will continue to use OUST every 6 months.


Having read this i think i will stick to the Oust lactic acid descaler -

Proper descaling with lactic acid

A premium and food safe way to ensure the proper descaling of your coffee machine is using a lactic acid based descaling solution. Lactic acid is used in many detergents and soaps due to its natural antibacterial properties. Lactic acid effectively removes limescale build-up from a coffee machine’s internals, while leaving little to no residue behind. It is also very effective in the removal of rust.

Can I use vinegar to descale my coffee machine

Some articles likely mention using common household vinegar to descale, which unfortunately does not turn out to be very effective. Vinegar is very weak and mild acid which is not effective to remove limescale or rust. Plus, you run the risk of leaving a vinegar taste in your machine. Vinegar has a potent smell which can take ages to get out of the pipes of your machine. And coffee and vinegar taste is not a good combination for your next cup.

 
Joined
Jan 13, 2016
Messages
8,428
Reaction score
5,332
Location
Sleaford - Lincolnshire

……​

Oh dear.

I quote on the bit about being “Eco Friendly”:

“Our recommendation is to look
for a lactic acid based solution.”

I quote from the Oust MSDS:

“Environmental precautions:
Do not discharge into drains
or rivers.”

:hat:
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2016
Messages
8,428
Reaction score
5,332
Location
Sleaford - Lincolnshire
BTW I have never suggested that anyone should use straight vinegar!

My OP suggested 50/50 acetic and citric acids plus waiting!
:hat:

PS

Apparently Lactic Acid can’t be the safest of things to use if you are Lactose Intolerant:

“But as the Mayo Clinic explains, if you're lactose intolerant, the undigested lactase ferments in your colon and creates lactic acid. As part of the process of diagnosing lactose intolerance, your doctor may ask you to submit a stool sample to be tested for lactic acid from lactose that has fermented in your colon. They may also test your breath for excess amounts of exhaled hydrogen — another sign that lactose is fermenting in your colon.

 
Last edited:

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
42,098
Reaction score
13,806
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
Oh dear.

I quote on the bit about being “Eco Friendly”:

“Our recommendation is to look
for a lactic acid based solution.”

I quote from the Oust MSDS:

“Environmental precautions:
Do not discharge into drains
or rivers.”

:hat:


The link doesn't go to OUST its a different site have you a link to the environmental precautions on the OUST site?
 
Top