Cold crash problem

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by Brewed_Force, Aug 19, 2018.

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  1. Aug 19, 2018 #1

    Brewed_Force

    Brewed_Force

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    I cold crashed my northern brown ale in my brew fridge for 2 days with the fridge set to the maximum cold. When I took the lid off the FV for bottling I found.... a brown ale slushy!
    I managed to syphon most of the beer into a bottling bucket but stirred up a lot of the crap from the bottom which I hope will settle in the bottle.
    Lesson learned..... after cold crashing leave the FV out at room temperature for a few hours to avoid icebergs.
     
  2. Aug 19, 2018 #2

    suffolkbeer

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    Or set the fridge not so cold?

    I normally cold crash at about 4-6deg and seems to do the trick without freezing the beer
     
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  3. Aug 19, 2018 #3

    BeerCat

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    That happened to me again last week. I should of known as the fridge is set to -1c and there was a thick layer of ice at the back. That will settle again really quickly so i would not worry about it.
     
  4. Aug 19, 2018 #4

    Ghillie

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    I don't think leaving the beer out for a while before racking to a bottling bucket is the best solution to your problem here... The best solution would be to avoid freezing your beer, that's basically all there is to it.

    You have a couple of options:

    1) Invest in a temperature controller so you can set an accurate cold crash temperature that isn't a crude and questionable 'maximum cold Celsius'. One of these will also help you to maintain a more consistent fermentation temperature also. Tow birds, one stone. They come as cheap as <£10 if you're alright with a little wiring, or about £27 for a plug and play setup:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Temperat...eating-Cooling-Aquarium-Brew-UK-/113208852667

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/Inkbird-IT...Thermostat/1160999577?iid=223007204692&chn=ps

    2) Cold crash with the fridge's thermostat at a reasonable temperature. You can get good results anywhere between 0-6C, it may just take a little longer to clarify at the higher end of the scale.
     
  5. Aug 19, 2018 #5

    Bigcol49

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    Hi!
    My (now defunct) fridge went haywire earlier this year and froze a keg of California Common. I allowed it to thaw and the beer had suffered no adverse effects.
     
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  6. Aug 19, 2018 #6

    Gunge

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    My brewing fridge packed up last week. Gonna have to use the kitchen one. Gawd knows where the fish fingers and other related junk are going to go. It'll give the missus reason for a new one I guess. Silver linings an' all that.
     
  7. Aug 20, 2018 #7

    -Bezza-

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    Does that not mean you now have a super-strength brown ale in the bottles? Or did the ice go in too?
     

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