Coopers Original Stout Review

Discussion in 'Beer Brewing Equipment & Beer Kit Reviews.' started by Archtronics, Feb 9, 2012.

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  1. Aug 25, 2019 #861

    terrym

    terrym

    terrym

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    @micklupulo
    Use this to calculate priming rates.
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/
    Irrespective of what the instructions may or may not suggest 8 g table sugar per litre gives 2.9 volumes which is far too much for a stout and for that matter many other beers.
    I would be aiming for one tsp sugar per litre (about 4.5g/litre) which will give about 2 volumes, and for lagers and AIPAs etc 1.5tsp per litre giving about 2.5 volumes. Others may do it differently.
     
  2. Aug 25, 2019 #862

    micklupulo

    micklupulo

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    @terrym

    Thanks for reply which is helpful and confirms my view that a half tsp. should be about right for an ale.
     
  3. Aug 26, 2019 #863

    micklupulo

    micklupulo

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    Still a bit puzzled about the Coopers Real Ale which despite being over carbonated seemed OK after a month in the bottle. Tried another one last night a month further on and it took me back to 1972 and fizzy metallic Watneys Red Barrell which was the only pub beer I ever left unfinished. Any suggestions about the likely cause would be welcome.
     
  4. Aug 27, 2019 #864

    Llamaman

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    Unfortunately, my experience of British pub best bitter type kits is exactly that - thin and slightly metallic. I think it’s just a really hard style to pull off with extract kits because it’s all about subtlety and balance.
    Heavily hopped pales, roasty stouts or yeast-driven Belgians etc all seem to fare better. It may be that the stronger flavours mask the off tastes from the kit.
    The good news is that the metallic taste will sometimes fade with time. My own-recipe ESB was pretty naff at first but got better after a few months. My Brewferm Gallia kit never got better though, and half went down the drain.
    My solution is that I’ve stopped trying to make this type of beer and just buy it. I’ll homebrew other styles I have more success with. If I ever get around to all grain I’ll have another go, as I suspect it’s the extract production that generates the off flavour and plenty of homebrewers produce good bitters so it must be possible! There’s a theory the fresh extract is fine, but as I buy all my stuff mail order I have no way of checking dates when I buy.

    Sorry if this isn’t the answer you were looking for!

    Edit: I should have said most of experience with bitter kits is from 15 years ago. I expect modern kits are better, but aside from the Brewferm I’ve not tried any yet. Once bitten, twice shy and all that...
     
  5. Aug 27, 2019 #865

    micklupulo

    micklupulo

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    Thanks Llamaman and as I have both bottles and space to spare I will not chuck the "Red Barrel" away yet and will retry in a couple of months or so though am a bit concerned that as it appears to have deteriorated there might be a progressive problem. 25 years ago I was able to produce really good A.G. bitters but after a long break in brewing have reverted to kits which in general do seem to have improved though the first attempt at an English style bitter has been a disappointment,; the over carbonation cannot have helped. Agree entirely that the elusive objective is a subtle balance of flavours but I will persist and try another kit maybe a Simply or Youngs Bitter or Yorkshire Bitter which seem to come out quite well in the reviews but am open to suggestions for a light tawny coloured bitter with a nice balance of hops and malt.
     
  6. Aug 27, 2019 #866

    terrym

    terrym

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    Although this a thread about the Coopers Stout not bitters or Coopers Real Ale, a short observation.
    I brewed the Real Ale sometime ago. I found it quite harsh. It's quite a bitter beer relative to other Coopers kits and maybe one of the kits in which Coopers use Pride of Ringwood hops, which is not one of my favourites. So that may be the answer to your question.
     
  7. Aug 27, 2019 #867

    micklupulo

    micklupulo

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    Thanks for the tip and apologies for being off topic but am new on here and have not yet mastered navigating the site.
     
    terrym likes this.
  8. Aug 27, 2019 #868

    terrym

    terrym

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    No problem. We were all new on here at some time.
     

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