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Covid-19 the second wave.

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Chippy_Tea

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Bte does it even seem lockdown to you? I was dropping my boys off in school in rugby where they live and roads were as bust as I have ever seen since prior to lockdown 1.
The roads round here are a lot quieter as out police force are stopping visitors and sending them home i think people got the message when they did this last time after the idiots swamped the lakes at the first opportunity they got.
 

Northern_Brewer

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Bte does it even seem lockdown to you? I was dropping my boys off in school in rugby where they live and roads were as bust as I have ever seen since prior to lockdown 1.
Of course the school run will look roughly as busy as "normal", as schools are open, whereas they weren't in April. But if you look at eg footfall data in shops & hospitality, the provinces are down ~80% compared to February versus ~50% in the summer, London's been hit a bit less. You can see the difference between England and Scotland, so it's pretty clearly a lockdown effect.

FWIW, I'm happy to take the vaccine as and when it's my turn. Partly because I'm not a vaccine freeloader, trying to minimise any possible risk to myself whilst happy to enjoy the benefits of a society that enjoys the benefits of lots of immune people. Which includes the economic benefits - something that people in safe government jobs may not weigh highly. Their assement might be different if the risk/benefit included for those not taking the jab, a throw of the dice (I know, die) which gave a 1 in 6 chance of them losing their job...

Chippy - I suspect the Lakes are a lot less attractive in the peeing rain, they can get a "swamp" at home!
 

Covrich

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Of course the school run will look roughly as busy as "normal", as schools are open, whereas they weren't in April. But if you look at eg footfall data in shops & hospitality, the provinces are down ~80% compared to February versus ~50% in the summer, London's been hit a bit less. You can see the difference between England and Scotland, so it's pretty clearly a lockdown effect.

FWIW, I'm happy to take the vaccine as and when it's my turn. Partly because I'm not a vaccine freeloader, trying to minimise any possible risk to myself whilst happy to enjoy the benefits of a society that enjoys the benefits of lots of immune people. Which includes the economic benefits - something that people in safe government jobs may not weigh highly. Their assement might be different if the risk/benefit included for those not taking the jab, a throw of the dice (I know, die) which gave a 1 in 6 chance of them losing their job...

Chippy - I suspect the Lakes are a lot less attractive in the peeing rain, they can get a "swamp" at home!

Like I say I am with you on taking the vaccine, I was giving the opinion of someone who worked in NHS for a very ling time across a wide range from theater to actually studing drugs treatments and administering them and understanding boosters jabs vaccines and .. she is retired now as of last december. Makes no odds to her and she probably would have it in time nobody here is anti vaccine, but carries cautious reservations because nobody knows what the effects it could cause just yet and anyone who says they do are not telling the truth. But I take opinions like that a lot more on board than what you always read on the internet right now because right now its confused conflicting when the science changes a lot. No anti vaccine agenda.. I hope we all get back to normal and kill the damn thing off
 

Chippy_Tea

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There have been more than 1.3 million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK and over 52,000 people have died, government figures show.

However, these figures include only people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for coronavirus and other measures suggest the number of deaths is higher.

New cases remain high after sharp increase

On Monday, the government announced a further 21,363 confirmed cases.
It's thought that infection rate was much higher during the first peak in the spring, but testing capacity at the time was too limited to detect the true number of daily cases.
Confirmed cases started rising again in July, with the rate of growth increasing sharply in September and October.





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Cheshire Cat

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Reported by the BBC

Spanish businessman who acted as a go-between to secure protective garments for NHS staff in the coronavirus pandemic, was paid $28m (£21m) in UK taxpayer cash.
The consultant had been in line for a further $20m of UK public funds, documents filed in a US court reveal.

I wonder who's getting millions for brokering the vaccine purchases.
 

Chippy_Tea

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Covid in Scotland: Level 4 lockdown to be imposed in 11 council areas

Scotland's toughest Covid restrictions are to be introduced in 11 council areas - including Glasgow - on Friday

The level four rules will see the closure of non-essential shops, pubs, restaurants and gyms.
They will be imposed in East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow, Renfrewshire and West Dunbartonshire.
North and South Lanarkshire, East and South Ayrshire, Stirling and West Lothian will also move to level four.
The new rules will affect about 2.3 million people living across west and central Scotland, and will remain in place until 11 December.
However, East Lothian and Midlothian will move from level three to level two from next Tuesday, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said.

Ms Sturgeon said there were grounds for "continued and significant concern" about levels of the virus in all of the council areas that would be moving to level four.
She added: "The infection rate in all of these areas remains stubbornly and worryingly high.
"At these levels, we simply do not have the assurance we need that hospital and ICU services will be able to cope as we go deeper into winter."
In the seven days up to Friday, Scotland as a whole had just over 140 new cases of Covid per 100,000 people.
Ms Sturgeon said all of the areas moving to level four were above that rate - ranging from West Lothian, which saw 158 cases per 100,000, to Glasgow with 277.

 

Leon103

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Reported by the BBC

Spanish businessman who acted as a go-between to secure protective garments for NHS staff in the coronavirus pandemic, was paid $28m (£21m) in UK taxpayer cash.
The consultant had been in line for a further $20m of UK public funds, documents filed in a US court reveal.

I wonder who's getting millions for brokering the vaccine purchases.
Not sure the answer I made sure my shares portfolio was moved over to pharmaceutical companies back in March.
 

Markk

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As I’ve said previously, infection rates aren’t going to reduce too much, if at all, whilst schools colleges and unis remain open. I just walked to the post office at school chucking out time. Lockdown and social distancing, what lockdown and social distancing?
 

Northern_Brewer

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More good news - according to this new preprint from La Jolla, it looks like the immune system "memory" works pretty well for SARS2, at least in most *but not all* people. So potentially we could be looking at something that's more like eg the traditional approach to tetanus with a booster every 5-10 years rather than an annual flu jab. If nothing else, it would take the pressure off having to jab the whole population within a year. before the first people need boosters again.
 
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Covrich

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More good news - according to this new preprint from La Jolla, it looks like the immune system "memory" works pretty well for SARS2, at least in most *but not all* people. So potentially we could be looking at something that's more like eg the traditional approach to tetanus with a booster every 5-10 years rather than an annual flu jab. If nothing else, it would take the pressure off having to jab the whole population within a year. before the first people need boosters again.

That is good news, it not only takes the pressure of everyone fighting for a jab and silly season for the next few years, it also gives people peace of mind and subciounsously will allow people to go about their business in hopefully a more normal way.
 

Northern_Brewer

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More good news from van Dorp et al at UCL - it seems the SARS2 in mink is not particularly well adapted to going back into humans. So no ATTACK OF THE KILLER MINK VIRUS.... And there seems to be a couple of common mutations that they acquire in mink pretty quickly, suggesting that they help it to adapt to attacking mink. It also suggests that the original infection in humans may have quickly adapted to humans, so it may be hard to get a definitive answer on the exact original route of transmission.

Also worth noting that there's a bit of a barney about that preprint, as they used some mink sequences before the people who had done the work had had a chance to publish them properly.
 

Covrich

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Ex dropped boys back says Rugby Hospital where she works and manages is horrific at the minute with patients being sent from Coventry which is really struggling with patients but not Covid but pateints with other problems heart and other illnesses (she went on and on) but have been unable to attend hospital or get care needed as a knock on effect over this year and are now in a much worse hea;lth condition.

So Coventry and warwickshire are being overrun but not directly from covid but the side effects 😔
 

terrym

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I see there are people making disparaging comments about the bloke who made £Ms by facilitating a PPE deal a few months back. Same people who months ago were making disparaging comments about lack of PPE at the time, fuelled by media 'outrage', in spite of the fact that the world and his wife were also scouring the planet for any company that could supply PPE, and were prepared to pay premium prices for it. So if this bloke located the necessary PPE at a time when it was required, whilst the sum he was paid now does seem outrageous, arguably if we hadn't paid it another country would have paid, and we would have lost out. And perhaps that would have meant lives were lost without the necessary PPE, something else that same people were only too happy to remind us about a few months back.
But to put this bloke's fee into perspective although there is a lot of grumbling about it, no-one really questions the money paid to top footballers who can earn up to £500k per week for kicking a ball about and which has nothing to do with saving lives.
And as far as money required for the new vaccines hopefully to become available soon, companies and perhaps governments have invested heavily in this and expect a return on their investment and risk strategy. And remember there will be some companies who have backed the wrong vaccine and their investment will be lost. But again if we are not prepared to pay the going rate then someone else will pay if the vaccines are in short supply, and this is already happening since I hear there are concerns about the availability of vaccines for countries in the developing world who cannot pay the going rate for mass immunisation.
 
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obscure

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I see there are people making disparaging comments about the bloke who made £Ms by facilitating a PPE deal a few months back. Same people who months ago were making disparaging comments about lack of PPE at the time, fuelled by media 'outrage', in spite of the fact that the world and his wife were also scouring the planet for any company that could supply PPE, and were prepared to pay premium prices for it. So if this bloke located the necessary PPE at a time when it was required, whilst the sum he was paid now does seem outrageous, arguably if we hadn't paid it another country would have paid, and we would have lost out. And perhaps that would have meant lives were lost without the necessary PPE, something else that same people were only too happy to remind us about a few months back.
But to put this bloke's fee into perspective although there is a lot of grumbling about it, no-one really questions the money paid to top footballers who can earn up to £500k per week for kicking a ball about and which has nothing to do with saving lives.
And as far as money required for the new vaccines hopefully to become available soon, companies and perhaps governments have invested heavily in this and expect a return on their investment and risk strategy. And remember there will be some companies who have backed the wrong vaccine and their investment will be lost. But again if we are not prepared to pay the going rate then someone else will pay if the vaccines are in short supply, and this is already happening since I hear there are concerns about the availability of vaccines for countries in the developing world who cannot pay the going rate for mass immunisation.
The issue is that the government completely set aside any kind of standard procurement policy. Of course if they had actually succeeded and obtained PPE of acceptable quality that would have being one thing (and even then procurement policy exists for a reason) but as was demonstrated on multiple occasions some of the contracts I,e. for gowns from Turkey turned out to be unusable.

Then of corse their is the blatant cronyism contracts being awarded to companies with close links to senior government figures (generally preferred supplier lists are supposed to be for companies with a long track record of providing goods and services not because they are recommended by a minister). Their is a reason the national audit office are now raising questions over how the government handled COVID related contracts.
 

trueblue

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I see there are people making disparaging comments about the bloke who made £Ms by facilitating a PPE deal a few months back. Same people who months ago were making disparaging comments about lack of PPE at the time, fuelled by media 'outrage', in spite of the fact that the world and his wife were also scouring the planet for any company that could supply PPE, and were prepared to pay premium prices for it. So if this bloke located the necessary PPE at a time when it was required, whilst the sum he was paid now does seem outrageous, arguably if we hadn't paid it another country would have paid, and we would have lost out. And perhaps that would have meant lives were lost without the necessary PPE, something else that same people were only too happy to remind us about a few months back.
But to put this bloke's fee into perspective although there is a lot of grumbling about it, no-one really questions the money paid to top footballers who can earn up to £500k per week for kicking a ball about and which has nothing to do with saving lives.
And as far as money required for the new vaccines hopefully to become available soon, companies and perhaps governments have invested heavily in this and expect a return on their investment and risk strategy. And remember there will be some companies who have backed the wrong vaccine and their investment will be lost. But again if we are not prepared to pay the going rate then someone else will pay if the vaccines are in short supply, and this is already happening since I hear there are concerns about the availability of vaccines for countries in the developing world who cannot pay the going rate for mass immunisation.
Footballers are not paid out of the public purse.
 

terrym

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The issue is that the government completely set aside any kind of standard procurement policy. Of course if they had actually succeeded and obtained PPE of acceptable quality that would have being one thing (and even then procurement policy exists for a reason) but as was demonstrated on multiple occasions some of the contracts I,e. for gowns from Turkey turned out to be unusable.

Then of corse their is the blatant cronyism contracts being awarded to companies with close links to senior government figures (generally preferred supplier lists are supposed to be for companies with a long track record of providing goods and services not because they are recommended by a minister). Their is a reason the national audit office are now raising questions over how the government handled COVID related contracts.
I think you might be under the impression that government ministers were singlehandedly responsible for obtaining PPE. That's not the case. 'The goverment' issue a directive and a budget to go with it and its then up to the army of civil servants in the supply chain, in this case NHS managers, to go out and carry out the plan. Its true that the standard procurement norms were probably chucked out the window, and substandard kit was bought. But whose fault is that? The procurement professionals who should have known what they were buying and set up audit checks along the way to ensure the spec was met, or a government minister who is only usually advised on what is required by the teams of civil servants who are in turn paid to identify a need. And this is a not political statement, its how the process works whoever is in power.
Finally on all large government sponsored contracts the National Audit Office will get involved sooner or later, and this is no exception, and not is unusual.
 

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