Quantcast
  • LoveBrewing Giveaway

    Check the thread to see whose name was chosen!!

    In honor of St. Patrick's Day

Covid-19 the second wave.

Help Support The HomeBrew Forum:

Northern_Brewer

Landlord.
Joined
Oct 5, 2019
Messages
846
Reaction score
674
It's not a choice between the economy and saving lives - the countries that proactively hit the virus hardest up front, are the ones that in general had less economic effect (from Michael Roser at Oxford)

1610209044111.png


TfL data on millions of people using the Tube is not good, more than double in the first week of this month compared to the first week of lockdown1 (via Lewis Goodall of Newsnight)

1610207631310.png


Ireland is one to watch, since Christmas it's gone from one of the least-affected countries to one of the worst.
 

mickthetrick

Senior Member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
707
Reaction score
160
Location
up near the pike. Co. Durham.
SWMBO works in a care home and is regularly tested she has just received a text saying she is negative, huge sigh of relief here.
same as my wife. she gets tested every week in the home she work at. she got a text this morning saying she is + and has to isolate. no symtoms what so ever. whats a real PITA is my daughter who was starting her new job on monday has had to try and get that sorted. my daughter and i have both had corvid at differant times but still have to do the right thing.
 

jjsh

Landlord.
Joined
Jan 4, 2011
Messages
3,613
Reaction score
2,027
Location
East Lindsey, Lincolnshire
Aren't care home workers high up the list for the vaccine? Me and the Mrs were on a zoom **** up last night with some friends and one of them is getting it next week because she is a care worker in an OAP home.
 

Leon103

Landlord.
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
6,708
Reaction score
2,723
Good news for the anglers -

Anglers have hailed the mental health benefits of the sport after it was given the all-clear to continue, despite lockdown.
The government said it would be treated as a form of exercise, but subject to restrictions such as social distancing.
Regulations mean people in England must stay at home except for specific purposes, including exercise, shopping for essentials and childcare.
Figures show thousands more people have taken up fishing during the pandemic.
John Ellis, national fisheries and angling manager for the Canal and Rivers Trust, said rod licence sales increased by 17% over the last year, the equivalent of about 100,000 people - some new to the sport and others returning.
He said, despite the colder weather which usually causes a drop in fishing, there are more people out than in a typical January.
"It is certainly one of few things people can do legally, can do locally," he said.

Under current restrictions in England, anglers must fish alone, or with members of their household, and must not travel outside their local area.
The government regulations permit people to meet for exercise, but not "for recreational or leisure purposes".
The Department for Culture Media and Sport told the BBC while angling could continue, overarching government guidance meant people should minimise time spent outside their homes.

Mr Ellis said he had received emails from parents pleased their children could go fishing at the weekend, adding that for some people it was linked to their mental wellbeing.
"When you are focussing on fishing, it is very hard to think about anything else, it clears the mind of other worries, at least temporarily," he said.

Headway Birmingham & Solihull, a charity which helps people living with brain injuries, runs regular fishing sessions, which were very popular with its clients.
"It encourages them to be more active and get some fresh air out in the countryside," she said.
"It also helps their motivation and mental wellbeing, giving them something to look forward to each week, something to talk about and a chance to form friendships with others who enjoy fishing too."

'Wind down'
Spencer Moore, a bailiff for Blackfords Progressive Angling Society, based in South Staffordshire, said the sport was perfect for social distancing.
"There are people furloughed, sitting in their house or working from home, but at least they can fish and can get out and wind down," he said.
"Being a fisherman, you are on your own on your peg. Someone might be on another peg, but they can be 20 to 30ft away, so you are nowhere near anyone else."

Chris Wood, from Shrewsbury Anglers Club, said the group had seen a definite "upsurge" in interest during the pandemic.
But, he said, it had also seen an increase in illegal fishing by people who were not aware of the proper permits needed.
And so it starts. Why aren't other solo sports also good for mental health?

What is local area? Lock down is is to lax as it is. People are taking the ****. The amount of cars I saw yesterday whilst walking was mental. People travelling 20 miles for a coffee/day out
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
Flexing the coronavirus lockdown rules could be fatal, the health secretary has warned as hospital admissions soar.

Matt Hancock did not rule out strengthening current restrictions and told the BBC's Andrew Marr the NHS was under "very serious pressure".

It comes after almost 60,000 new cases of coronavirus were reported in the UK on Saturday and the number of deaths after a positive test passed 80,000.

Scientist Prof Peter Horby warned the UK was in "the eye of the storm".

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the rules were tough but "may not be tough enough" and called for the government to hold daily press conferences to avoid "mixed messages".

Mr Hancock told Andrew Marr "every time you try to flex the rules that could be fatal" and said staying at home was the "most important thing we can do collectively as a society".

The health secretary said he did not want to speculate on whether the government would further strengthen restrictions.

"People need to not just follow the letter of the rules but follow the spirit as well and play their part," he said.

The government has launched a campaign telling people to act like they have got the virus in a bid to tackle the rise in infections.

Under the national lockdown, people in England must stay at home and can go out only for limited reasons such as food shopping, exercise, or work if they cannot do so from home. Similar measures are in place across much of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Prof Horby, who is chairman of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag), said there may be "early signs that something is beginning to bite" in terms of the restrictions - but if they did not then stricter measures would be needed.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "I really hope people take this very seriously. It was bad in March, it's much worse now.

"We've seen record numbers across the board, record numbers of cases, record numbers of hospitalisations, record numbers of deaths."

"We are in a situation where everything that was risky in the past is now more risky," he said.

Prof Horby said the early signs were encouraging that the vaccines would be effective against the new Covid variants - first identified in the UK and in South Africa - and he did not want people to "hide under the duvet".

"We can see the end game now," he said.


Covid-19: Hancock warns flexing of rules 'could be fatal' - BBC News
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
And so it starts. Why aren't other solo sports also good for mental health?

What is local area? Lock down is is to lax as it is. People are taking the ****. The amount of cars I saw yesterday whilst walking was mental. People travelling 20 miles for a coffee/day out
I don't see why solo sport or solo anything should be banned the virus cannot infect people who are not together and if this helps peoples mental wellbeing i don't see the problem.

I see they are reporting the number of kids turning up at school has shot through the roof as parents claim they are key workers.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
Unions have hit back at decisions from some councils in Wales to deny childcare to certain groups of key workers.


Who does the Welsh Government class as key workers?

  • Health and social care workers such as doctors, nurses and paramedics
  • Public safety (emergency workers) and national security workers
  • Education and childcare workers
  • Food and other necessary goods workers, such as farmers and food retailers
  • Transport workers, such as bus and taxi drivers
  • Utilities, communication and financial services workers such as 999 call handlers, postmen and journalists
  • Key public service workers, such as RSPCA inspectors and front-line council workers


The Welsh Government compiled a list of jobs deemed critical at the beginning of the Covid pandemic, which was provided to local authorities.
However, some councils compiled their own lists which do not include jobs such as food workers and teachers.
Teaching union Nasuwt said it was "nonsensical".
Schools will stay closed to most pupils until the February half term unless there is a "significant" fall in Covid cases, with childcare provided to vulnerable children and the children of key workers.
According to the Welsh Government guidance, local authorities "must have regard to the list" when deciding who is a critical worker, but every child who can be safely cared for at home should be.
The shop worker union Usdaw said it was crucial food workers should be able to access the childcare so stores can stay open, and the Trades Union Congress (TUC) said childcare provision had become a "postcode lottery".

While many councils confirmed to BBC Wales that they were following the Welsh Government's list, others said they did not define some of the roles included as essential.
Ceredigion council's list only includes front-line workers for the care and health sector and blue light services - just two of the Welsh Government's list of seven groups.
A spokeswoman said: "In accordance to the guidance, Ceredigion has taken due regard of the Welsh Government list of critical workers."

Initially Carmarthenshire council included school staff but not food, utilities, communication or transport workers - but then reconsidered and now includes the Welsh Government's full list of critical workers.
Rhondda Cynon Taf, Bridgend and Vale of Glamorgan included childcare and education staff - but not food, transport, utilities or council workers, or communication workers such as public service journalists providing Covid-19 coverage.
A Bridgend council spokesman said: "There are limited spaces available at schools due to the need to maintain small class bubbles, ensure teaching staff are able to continue to provide online learning for learners at home and cover for any staff sickness."
He added if it became possible to extend the support to more workers, the council would do so.
Swansea, Gwynedd, Torfaen, Pembrokeshire, Newport, Flintshire, Anglesey, Monmouthshire, Powys, Caerphilly, Conwy, Merthyr Tydfil and Cardiff all said they are following the Welsh Government's list of key workers in allocating childcare, with Cardiff and Merthyr prioritising the children of parents in NHS, blue light, education and social care if there were any shortages.
Blaenau Gwent, Wrexham, Neath Port Talbot and Denbighshire councils did not provide details of their key worker provisions when asked by the BBC.

Full article - Covid: Teachers and supermarket staff ‘not key workers’ - BBC News
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
I have been taking extra D along with what is already in the daily multivitamin I take since the doctor in the video posted here months ago recommended it.
 

Northern_Brewer

Landlord.
Joined
Oct 5, 2019
Messages
846
Reaction score
674
I imagine that's not everywhere, it's an attempt to get the R below 1 in Kent by trying to identify the 1 in 3 that could be spreading it but don't have symptoms.

To be honest I'd be more worried about London at the moment, it looks like it's really taking off there.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
To be honest I'd be more worried about London at the moment, it looks like it's really taking off there
.


Press release
Statement from Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty on national alert levels
Chief Medical Officer, Professor Chris Whitty writes about the UK's battle with Covid-19.

We have faced several grave moments during our battle against coronavirus. But right now, the country is perhaps facing the most serious yet.

The new, more transmissible variant of this disease is spreading rapidly across the country and having tragic consequences. On Monday the 4 UK Chief Medical Officers and the NHS Medical Director recommended raising the national alert level to the maximum of level 5 for the first time. This means that without further action there is a material risk of our healthcare services being overwhelmed within 21 days. Since then the situation has deteriorated further.

Hospitals are always busy in the winter but the NHS in some parts of the country is currently facing the most dangerous situation anyone can remember. If the virus continues on its current trajectory many hospitals will be in real difficulties, and very soon. This means that the time people wait for care will continue to increase to potentially unsafe levels, hospitals won’t have room to take redirected emergency cases in regional networks, staff to patient ratios which are already stretched will become unacceptable even in places likes intensive care. There will be avoidable deaths. NHS staff are doing their absolute best, and working remarkably; we all owe them a huge debt of gratitude, but even they have limits.

The public have made an extraordinary effort so far. Of course we are all tired of restrictions, but we need to find the collective strength to get through this critical stage and save as many lives as we can. The advice right now is unambiguous: to drive the numbers down, we must stay home except for work, exercise and essential activities. Every unnecessary interaction you have could be the link in a chain of transmission which has a vulnerable person at the end.

These restrictions will not last forever. Science has delivered new vaccines, drugs and tests, with more on the way, in record time. People will be reunited. Vaccines and new treatments offer us hope and a clear way out. But we are not there yet, and should not act as if we are.

We still have weeks to go before vaccines will start reducing COVID deaths and, some weeks later, the number of people being hospitalised. We cannot afford to let our justified optimism for the future come at the expense of difficult action today. That means for now staying home and avoiding all unnecessary contacts. By following the rules, we will save lives and help normal life return more swiftly.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
EVERY adult is on course to get the Covid vaccine by autumn with 200,000 Brits already getting jabbed each day, Matt Hancock said today. (from The Sun newspaper)

The Health Secretary unveiled the UK's "exit strategy" out of the pandemic and revealed 350million doses of the vaccine are on order.

And he said he hopes every adult will have received the jab by autumn this year as part of the biggest vaccination programme ever.

Mr Hancock told the BBC's Andrew Marr show: "We are going to have enough to offer the vaccine to everyone aged over 18 by autumn."

But the MP explained this will have to be carried out "according to need" with the most vulnerable offered the vaccine first.

He also revealed the UK has vaccinated around 2million people over the past week - more people than it did in the entirety of December.

This puts the government on course to reach its target of 13million people vaccinated by mid-February, he explained.

He told Sky News' Sophy Ridge: "Yes we're on course. The rate limiting factor at the moment is supply but that's increasing.

"I'm very glad to say that at the moment we're running at over 200,000 people being vaccinated every day.

"We've now vaccinated around one third of the over-80s in this country so we're making significant progress but there's still further expansion to go.

"This week we're opening mass vaccination centres. Big sites for instance at Epsom racecourse, there's seven going live this week with more to come next week where we will get through very large numbers of people."

Mr Hancock also revealed the country is likely to see a joint vaccination programme in place for the "foreseeable" future.

"I think it's highly likely that there will be a dual-vaccination programme for the foreseeable - this is the medium-term - of flu and Covid," he added.

But despite the glimmer of hope, Mr Hancock urged people to still stay home if they can as "every flexibility" of the rules could prove fatal.

And he refused to speculate on whether the lockdown rules could be strengthened amid claims from scientists they are "too lax" in stopping the spread.

Asked about the prospect of tighter restrictions, he told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show: "I don't want to speculate because the most important message is not whether the Government will further strengthen the rules.

"The most important thing is that people stay at home and follow the rules that we have got.

"And that, in terms of the scale of the impact on the cases, that is the most important thing we can do collectively as a society."

It comes as Boris Johnson vowed to vaccinate at least 200,000 Brits a day by next week — with the Army joining his Covid war.

The PM said that by next Friday, January 15, the rollout of the vaccine would be hugely ramped up,

A new national booking service for people to be vaccinated will also be unveiled - and no one will have to travel more than ten miles to get one, the PM added.

He said more than 1,400 hospitals, GP practices and pharmacies would be immunising patients by the end of next week.

And he insisted he had "no doubt" that there would be enough supply to offer everyone in the top four vulnerable groups a vaccine by his February 15 deadline.

He added: "We are in a race against time, but I can assure you we are doing everything we can to vaccinate as many people as we can across the whole of the UK."

From tomorrow, the government will begin publishing daily vaccination statistics as well as Boris' full battle plan.

Professor Peter Horby, chairman of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag), warned today people may have to get a vaccine "every few years" if it needs to be updated against new variants.

He said the information to date on the success of vaccines against new variants is "very encouraging", but warned the virus "will not go away".

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "This one (virus) I think will not go away. We're going to have to live with it but that may change significantly.

"It may well become more of an endemic virus, that's with us all the time and may cause some seasonal pressures and some excess deaths, but is not causing the huge disruption that we're seeing now."

It comes as Joan Collins, 87, today revealed she has become the latest celeb to receive the vaccine.

She follows the Queen and Prince Philip and 81-year-old Sir Ian McKellen.
 

Northern_Brewer

Landlord.
Joined
Oct 5, 2019
Messages
846
Reaction score
674
I imagine that's not everywhere,
Fair enough, it looks like lateral-flow tests are being offered across England from this coming week :

EVERY adult is on course to get the Covid vaccine by autumn with 200,000 Brits already getting jabbed each day, Matt Hancock said today. (from The Sun newspaper)...

Mr Hancock told the BBC's Andrew Marr show: "We are going to have enough to offer the vaccine to everyone aged over 18 by autumn."
It really doesn't help when the media misread what was actually said. There's a big difference between *offering* everyone a vaccine and *getting* a vaccine - and the politicians know it, that way they can say "well we offered it to everyone but lots of you idiots chose not to take it" when not everyone takes up the offer. Bear in mind that only around 70% of vulnerable groups take up a free flu jab, there's a potentially a big difference between the offer being there and it actually being delivered.

From tomorrow, the government will begin publishing daily vaccination statistics as well as Boris' full battle plan.
One sentence that sums up so much of what is wrong at the moment.

Allegedly the reason that the government has not been publishing daily vaccination statistics hitherto is because the computer systems have been a complete mess, meaning that people have resorted to recording details on paper and typing them in separately to 2 or more computer systems because the computers weren't talking to each other.

There's the ridiculous need to call on imagery of war to feed Johnson's Churchill myth - do you think Jacinda Ardern is boasting of her "battle plan"? No she just has an ordinary plan for a health emergency.

And what happened to collective government? OK, Hancock's useless, but so far Johnson has taken "personal charge" of everything from fighting gangs to getting children back to school, to Covid overall (February), Covid testing (April), social distancing (June) and airbridges to ensure people's summer holidays.

And then he has the nerve to ask "“Who is in charge of implementing this delivery plan? "

So all this "personal charge" is just polishing his ego, but is utterly meaningless in reality - because if he has been in charge then he's been doing a lousy job of it.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
33,419
Reaction score
8,830
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
It really doesn't help when the media misread what was actually said. There's a big difference between *offering* everyone a vaccine and *getting* a vaccine - and the politicians know it, that way they can say "well we offered it to everyone but lots of you idiots chose not to take it" when not everyone takes up the offer. Bear in mind that only around 70% of vulnerable groups take up a free flu jab, there's a potentially a big difference between the offer being there and it actually being delivered.
I think you may be reading too much into the wording surely they have to say offer as they cannot force people to take it.
 
Top