DIY PBW

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by Oneiroi, Jul 11, 2018.

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  1. Jul 11, 2018 #1

    Oneiroi

    Oneiroi

    Oneiroi

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    I've just come across this blog which discusses adding other chemicals to Oxy clean to make it closer in cleaning power to PBW (Specifically Trisodium phosphate or green equivalent + a comment mentions citric acid as a chelating agent) http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2012/11/super-charge-your-oxiclean.html

    Anyone here do anything like this? I don't have many/any problems with regular oxy, but if it can be made better for about the same cost pound for pound it could be interesting?
     
  2. Jul 11, 2018 #2

    JonBrew

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    I heard John Palmer talk about this on the Brew Strong podcast. I was curious but never attempted it myself. I've always been a bit afraid of mixing cleaners in case they react and melt my face off. Having said that, it seems that this combination seems to be confirmed safe by a few sources.

    Also, I have struggled to find Tri-sodium phosphate (phosphate free) locally or online. SS Brew Tech recommend it for removing left over machine oils for first time use of their equipment as it is a very good degreaser. I believe the UK equivalent is 'sugar soap' but I wasn't able to assure myself that stuff is phosphate free so I never used it.

    If you try it/find the right chemicals, do post back with your results.

    Cheers
     
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  3. Jul 11, 2018 #3

    -Bezza-

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    Wouldn't phosphate free tri-sodium phosphate just be sodium? ;)
     
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  4. Jul 11, 2018 #4

    Oneiroi

    Oneiroi

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2018
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  5. Jul 11, 2018 #5

    foxbat

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    I use real PBW but at a rate of only 10g per US gal (3.7l) which is a tip I picked up from another forum.

    At 3 1-gal washes per brew (kettle, fermenter, keg) I get about 15 brews per pot which is far more than if I used the rate printed on the pot.
     
  6. Jul 11, 2018 #6

    Simonh82

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    There is a really long thread on homebrew talk about it. I've not made my own yet but I'd be interested to try at some point in the future. When I've used laundry oxi-clean I've ended up with a white precipitant which can attach itself quite well to my kettle and needs a lot of washing. PBW works great but is quite expensive.

    I like the tip about using a lower dose of PBW I 'might try that and see if it still works on my equipment.
     
  7. Jul 11, 2018 #7

    Sadfield

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    I wonder how much of a dilution of PWBs extra ingredients it takes to reduce their effectiveness? Say if you cut PWB with cheaper oxy, so as not to reduce the Sodium Percarbonate level used.
    Given the supplied quantities of the extra ingredients have to buy, it may be a cheaper option. Although, EDTA and Sodium Metasilicate are both available on eBay.

    This seller looks handy for samples.
    https://ebay.co.uk/usr/kitchen-chemistry

    Sent from my E5823 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018

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