Finished fruit...

Discussion in 'Wine & Cider Recipes' started by DanielB, Oct 5, 2018.

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  1. Oct 5, 2018 #1

    DanielB

    DanielB

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    I just made some brilliant fruit leather with the fermented rhubarb from some rhubarb wine... It seemed such a waste to chuck it... It seems I have found a use!

    Any other uses?

    Apologies...mods, please move or remove if this isn't the place for such a question!
     

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  2. Oct 6, 2018 #2

    Dutto

    Dutto

    Dutto

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    Fruit leather?

    Questions are:
    1. What do you do with it?
    2. How durable is it?
    3. What properties does it have?
    If I knew that it would help.
     
  3. Oct 6, 2018 #3

    Clint

    Clint

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    You eat it.
    Depends on your teeth.
    Leathery appearance,tastes like fruit.
     
  4. Oct 6, 2018 #4

    Bigcol49

    Bigcol49

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    Hi!
    You could always feed it to geese.
    It'll go through them faster than sh*t through a . . . oh!
     
  5. Oct 6, 2018 #5

    DanielB

    DanielB

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    Yeah, sorry...I didn't mean to be so cryptic dutto, Clint is right.

    I've made the same stuff that you pay a lot for that goes in the kids lunch boxes - basically dried fruit that is squished very flat and rolled up, or sold in strips....costs a fortune but is "a healthy snack" (although not sure what's wrong with an apple...anyway)... I was throwing away the fruit after fermentation in the bucket....so wondered what I could do with it...

    Put it in a saucepan, with a cup or two of water and soften the fruit. Add suger and some lemon juice to taste. Give it a good blend until smooth. Let it cook gently a bit more to thicken up a bit. Meanwhile line a shallow baking try with cling film and put the oven on very low, 60°C.

    Pour out the fruit on to the lined tray and spread really thin, about a quarter inche thick...

    Put it in the oven for a long time (12hrs?) Until it's fully dried out.

    Take it out, peel it off the cling film and, voila. Fruit leather.

    It's not great, but it's edible...
     
  6. Oct 6, 2018 #6

    Chippy_Tea

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    12 hours ashock1 i am not surprised it costs a fortune to buy.
     
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  7. Oct 6, 2018 #7

    DanielB

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    I know! I've saved a fortune on pack lunches, and only spent money on rhubarb, sugar, yeast, nutrients, brewing equipment, dwnijdemi, airlocks, bottles, saucepans, more sugar, lemons, gas for the stove, and cling film and then the oven. clapa
     
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  8. Oct 7, 2018 #8

    Dutto

    Dutto

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    I was the "Rhubarb Leather" that got me thinking; and I dread to think how much sugar it would take to get a kid to eat it!

    My own money saver is:
    • Stick a few tablespoonfuls of porridge oats into a bowl,
    • Add a dessert spoonful of peanut butter.
    • Add a dessert spoonful of black treacle.
    • Add a hefty pinch of salt.
    • Add a very small amount of water and mix it all together to form a solid dough.
    • Grease up a baking tray with olive oil.
    • Roll out the dough on to the baking tray until it's about 6mm thick.
    • Use a Pizza Cutter to mark it into rectangles. (I usually get 16 of them.)
    • Bake in a really hot (pre-heated) oven until they go brown. (About 15 -20 minutes.)
    • Lift them out of the oven onto a wire rack, then put them back into the oven and switch the oven off.
    When they have cooled down they will be crisp "oaties". Store them in a sealed container or they will go leathery. (*)

    (*) If they are "leathery" when lifted out of the oven you have used too much water. It's an easy mistake to make and ...

    ... on how long one lasts!
     

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