First brew fermenting with Fermentasaurus

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MikeBusby

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I am brewing a golden ale today and will be using my Snub Nose Gen 3 fermenter for the first time. I am not using bottled CO2, but want to force carb in it. I have put a 10psi PRV in place as recommended by B2B.

I have read that the first couple of days should not be done under pressure in order to let the yeast do it’s thing. Is this correct and, if so, do I just lift the PRV every now and then over this period? I want to dry hop after 3 days so I guess I should let the pressure build up a bit before I do that?

Any help on this would be much appreciated. I am using MJ M36 yeast.
 

foxy

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I am brewing a golden ale today and will be using my Snub Nose Gen 3 fermenter for the first time. I am not using bottled CO2, but want to force carb in it. I have put a 10psi PRV in place as recommended by B2B.

I have read that the first couple of days should not be done under pressure in order to let the yeast do it’s thing. Is this correct and, if so, do I just lift the PRV every now and then over this period? I want to dry hop after 3 days so I guess I should let the pressure build up a bit before I do that?

Any help on this would be much appreciated. I am using MJ M36 yeast.
No you don't just release through the PRV, fix some tube to gas ball lock connector and using the gas post have a blow off tube going into a solution of sanitiser. You will still need to get a gas bottle of CO2 to get the beer out. For ales if you fermenting in a closed vessel, cap the fermenter when you just have a couple of points to go to final gravity.
 

MikeBusby

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No you don't just release through the PRV, fix some tube to gas ball lock connector and using the gas post have a blow off tube going into a solution of sanitiser. You will still need to get a gas bottle of CO2 to get the beer out. For ales if you fermenting in a closed vessel, cap the fermenter when you just have a couple of points to go to final gravity.
Thanks for your reply. The guy at B2B told me that I don’t need an airlock/blow off tube as the 10psi PRV will release the CO2. Why do you think that it is necessary?
 

foxy

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Because yeast performs better at 1ATM, making a good ale is about yeast, the yeast has to be happy with its environment, not sharing its living space with disolved CO2. All closed vessel fermentations is supposed to achieve is some degree of carbonation as it finishes fermenting, nothing more.
 

MikeBusby

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Thanks again. As I am in the process of getting the CO2 bottle and necessary bits for getting the beer out, I don’t think I have a gas ball lock connector at the moment. The fermentation is about 20 hours in at the moment. What is the next best way release the CO2?
 

BlackRegent

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If you're 20 hours in, there may be a build up of pressure already. I would pull the PRV to depressurise the vessel and then unscrew the PRV slightly so that the gas can release naturally. When you're ready to carbonate, screw the PRV back in and let the pressure build.
 

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Thought the idea behind spunding valve was it could be adjusted down to near atmospheric for the early stage of fermentation as @foxy says above and then at the appropriate time adjust the pressure up to carbonate towards the end of carbonation. But I accept that constant monitoring and venting could achieve much the same result. It’s just the spunding valve and @foxy suggestion of venting through the gas post and blow off tube are fit and forget solutions……and more expensive ashock1
 

foxy

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I thought spunding valves were a “must have” with pressure fermenters? :confused.:
With the 10 and 15 PSI PRV's (which is what most people set on the spunding valve) gives a low cost alternative to a spunding valve. A bit of tube running from the gas post into a sterile solution wouldn't be expensive. If I was the OP without the full set up I would just have used a piece of cling wrap and a rubber band instead of the lid.
 

thegrantickle

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No you don't just release through the PRV, fix some tube to gas ball lock connector and using the gas post have a blow off tube going into a solution of sanitiser. You will still need to get a gas bottle of CO2 to get the beer out. For ales if you fermenting in a closed vessel, cap the fermenter when you just have a couple of points to go to final gravity.
As usual you chime in with absolutes, as of there is only way to do something, rather than giving your opinion. You are incorrect. Fermentation under pressure is not solely for carbonation purposes. Yeast does not necessarily "perform better" under 1 atmosphere. What do you mean by better in this case? Fermentation under pressure aids ester suppression and thus can give a cleaner fermentation, and allow you to ferment warmer thus speeding up the fermentation process.
 

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As other threads have demonstrated, we all have different opinions on the merits (or otherwise) of fermenting under pressure. Probably best we don't go back there 🙃
 

foxy

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As usual you chime in with absolutes, as of there is only way to do something, rather than giving your opinion. You are incorrect. Fermentation under pressure is not solely for carbonation purposes. Yeast does not necessarily "perform better" under 1 atmosphere. What do you mean by better in this case? Fermentation under pressure aids ester suppression and thus can give a cleaner fermentation, and allow you to ferment warmer thus speeding up the fermentation process.
Yes pressure fermentation is so good all the commercials are doing it.
Ale yeast performs at its best at 1 ATM, the ester suppression is not what is needed, there is an inverse relationship between pressure and yeast. The esters being suppressed are part of the make up of flavour and aroma. Why do you think there are so many strains of yeast? Each yeast strain adds something to the beer being produced.
Go to almost any brewery you will find that the only time pressure is applied is when the fermentation is almost complete. This gives the beer some carbonation, not all as it goes towards packaging.
 

thegrantickle

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Yes pressure fermentation is so good all the commercials are doing it.
Ale yeast performs at its best at 1 ATM, the ester suppression is not what is needed, there is an inverse relationship between pressure and yeast. The esters being suppressed are part of the make up of flavour and aroma. Why do you think there are so many strains of yeast? Each yeast strain adds something to the beer being produced.
Go to almost any brewery you will find that the only time pressure is applied is when the fermentation is almost complete. This gives the beer some carbonation, not all as it goes towards packaging.
So f***ing boring reading you drone on saying the same things over and again.
 

foxy

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So f***ing boring reading you drone on saying the same things over and again.
Simple solution. 'Press the ignore button'
I would suggest you read 'Brewing yeast and fermentation' probably a little to technical for you, the authors are Professors Chris Boulton and David Quain both eminent micro biologists who have spent their working life in the brewing industry. Commercial breweries with the larger fermenting vessels go to great lengths to eliminate the hydro static pressure on the yeast. That should indicate something.
 

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