Fluctuating mineral levels - water profile

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by Bashley, May 17, 2018 at 12:52 PM.

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  1. May 17, 2018 at 12:52 PM #1

    Bashley

    Bashley

    Bashley

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    Hi All

    I've finally received my full water profile and as expected it apparently comes from 3 'stations' or sources. Therefore it fluctuates quite a bit. So I guess my questions are:
    Is there any hope? Are we just concerned with adding gypsum or sodium in order to change the PH?
    Meaning, at the end of the day am I right in saying that regardless of the profile, the goal is to obtain the right PH for your beer style by hook or by crook?

    Thanks for any help, this topic is a tad painful and complicated.
     
  2. May 17, 2018 at 1:20 PM #2

    Simonh82

    Simonh82

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    The main goals of water treatment are the right pH for the mash and correct mineral profile for the beer style.

    If your water reports are very variable, I would get an alkalinity testing kit, as this is the most important variable for your brewing water. A calcium test might also be worth going for. I've found that whilst my alkalinity and calcium levels will vary a little bit the sulphate and chloride levels remain pretty consistent.

    It's the alkalinity that will help you determine your mash pH but the sulphate and chloride which are the main flavour ions. Beers high in sulphate are dry and accentuate hop bitterness. Beers high in chloride will accentuate malty sweetness.

    You can use the alkalinity test to get the right pH and then adjust the flavour with sulphate or chloride in the form of gypsum or calcium chloride.
     
  3. May 17, 2018 at 3:29 PM #3

    chewie

    chewie

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    If you want to nail every Brew to an exact consistency then testing each batch of water can get expensive, especially if you listen to the likes of Palmer and buy one of his "testing kits".
    One route that quite a few go down is using a mineral water like Tesco ashbeck which will give consistent results and is reasonably cheap.
     
  4. May 17, 2018 at 9:11 PM #4

    aamcle

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    Ashbeck is what you want it's about £1.10 for 5litres so it's not too bad but there are alternatives you could buy in RO water from an aquarium/tropical fish supplier it's cheaper or you could go the whole not and buy a RO system.

    Aamcle
     
  5. May 17, 2018 at 11:34 PM #5

    Bashley

    Bashley

    Bashley

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    I'd really like to avoid buying bottled water if I can. All that plastic! :)
     
    Simonh82 likes this.
  6. May 18, 2018 at 9:00 AM #6

    aamcle

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    The bottles can be recycled, if you buy RO water you would use and reuse your own water container. A RO system avoids all that but wastes a lot of water.


    Aamcle
     
  7. May 18, 2018 at 11:59 AM #7

    Simonh82

    Simonh82

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    Bottled water or RO shouldn't be necessary unless there is really something wrong with your water. Share your water report and I'm sure people will be happy to advise. The Salifert test kits are not too expensive and will allow you to make adjustments to your water.
     

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