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Just went to deliver to the Beer Emporium in Sandbach, check this out :)
196C6961-ECC2-4B99-8F4C-D768683B21C8.jpeg
 
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For those of us not steeped in Sandbach Lore, can you tell us what a Murgy is.
On behalf of @chopps I will answer that

He lives in Sandbach but despite lots of trying couldn't find premises to brew in, in Sandbach, so had to settle for Middlewich which is about 4 or 5 miles away

Middlewich is known for its salt production and the first factory producing salt was owned by a Mr Murgatroyd

The road between Sandbach is a very straight road and became known as Murgy's Straight!
 
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I watched the latest video last night. My 10 year old son was asking why was I watching some bald boy eating a croissant 🥐
😂😂
Hehe. :) I cut out the part where you could hear me peeing then flushing Mike’s toilet while the camera filmed the mash. Comedy gold for a 10 year old that.
 

Agentgonzo

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Thank you for doing these videos. It's been fascinating to watch through the building the brewery and how the processes differ from homebrew.

Do you oxygenate/aerate your wort? Having heard so much importance about aerating the wort and rehydrating dried yeast, it was a bit of a surprise to watch you just chucking it in and closing the fermenter! Also interesting to see you just doing a 'normal' transfer of a dry-hopped beer without purging everything in sight with CO2!
 
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Having heard so much importance about aerating the wort and rehydrating dried yeast, it was a bit of a surprise to watch you just chucking it in and closing the fermenter! Also interesting to see you just doing a 'normal' transfer of a dry-hopped beer without purging everything in sight with CO2!
Modern production methods mean that the current advice from Fermentis is :

The standard rehydration procedure involves the sprinkling of the desired amount of yeast in 10 times its weight in sterile water or hopped wort within a specific optimal temperature range for each yeast and leave to rest for a set amount of time under gentle stirring. Next the yeast cream is pitched in the fermenter.

Although this procedure has been proven to be effective, the first results of a new study in which 3 different rehydration procedures, i.e. rehydration at 30°C with moderate agitation, rehydration in 15°P wort at 20°C with moderate agitation and direct pitching without rehydration, indicate no significant differences in fermentation performance for all tested ale yeasts (SafAle™ S-04, SafAle™ US-05, SafAle™ K-97, SafAle™ S-33, SafAle™ WB-06, SafAle™ BE-256, SafAle™ T-58, SafAle™ BE-134) and lager yeasts (SafLager™ S-23, SafLager™ S-189 and SafLager™ W-34/70). At the end of fermentations, no significant differences in concentration of ethanol, residual sugars and volatiles (acetaldehyde, esters, higher alcohols and vicinal diketones) between rehydration procedures were observed (see figure 2). This indicates that the direct pitching procedure is adequate for fermentation.


And yeast don't need oxygen to "breathe" during fermentation, they only need it to build sterols which are components of the cell wall, but dry yeast are grown in a way that stuffs them full of sterols so they need little if any oxygen during fermentation, see eg :
We don’t recommend aerating the wort in normal conditions. The dry yeast has been produced and dried with a specific know-how of the Lesaffre Group, in order to maximize the Ergosterols content of the cells. This allows the yeast to grow/multiply and ferment well.

And purging with CO2 may make sense for keg beers but is pointless for cask beer - forget what the colonials think, the British have been dry-hopping without CO2 purges since before the US or Germany were even countries!
 
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Thank you for doing these videos. It's been fascinating to watch through the building the brewery and how the processes differ from homebrew.

Do you oxygenate/aerate your wort? Having heard so much importance about aerating the wort and rehydrating dried yeast, it was a bit of a surprise to watch you just chucking it in and closing the fermenter! Also interesting to see you just doing a 'normal' transfer of a dry-hopped beer without purging everything in sight with CO2!
Hi, good questions @Agentgonzo and good answers already posted by @Northern_Brewer above.
I direct pitch US-05 and S-04, on the basis that it makes no difference whatsoever if I rehydrate. This is something that I brought from homebrewing and I have just kept doing it. I'm not averse to rehydration if the manufacturer recommends, but Fermentis don't.

As for aeration, the tank is filled from the top and is plenty aerated by the time it's full. I haven't tried to aerate in other ways, but if it ain't broke.... and it seems not to be broke so far.

I have started to trial a few keg (rather than cask) fills recently and I'm purging with CO2, but in cask for this recipe it seems to make no difference at all. I take care when filling not to introduce too much air, it's a gentle and time consuming fill.
But it's inevitable some oxygen is present and introduced to the beer.
I haven't experienced any reports of oxidisation in the 3000+ pints sold so far, so again ... if it aint broke...

Cheers for watching!
 
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the first results of a new study in which 3 different rehydration procedures, i.e. rehydration at 30°C with moderate agitation, rehydration in 15°P wort at 20°C with moderate agitation and direct pitching without rehydration, indicate no significant differences in fermentation performance for all tested ale yeasts (SafAle™ S-04, SafAle™ US-05, SafAle™ K-97, SafAle™ S-33, SafAle™ WB-06, SafAle™ BE-256, SafAle™ T-58, SafAle™ BE-134) and lager yeasts (SafLager™ S-23, SafLager™ S-189 and SafLager™ W-34/70). At the end of fermentations, no significant differences in concentration of ethanol, residual sugars and volatiles (acetaldehyde, esters, higher alcohols and vicinal diketones) between rehydration procedures were observed (see figure 2). This indicates that the direct pitching procedure is adequate for fermentation.
Well that's going to annoy some `experts'. As is: `We don’t recommend aerating the wort in normal conditions. '
 
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