Full volume mash with no sparge for 75 minutes?

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davidgrace

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Following instructions, I usually do a full volume no sparge mash at 75 minutes for a recipe that requires a 60 minute mash. I assume the extra 15 minutes is to replace the “no sparge” However, my next brew is the Dead Pony Club and that requires a 75 minute mash at 62% followed by the sparge. So, I am thinking that I should do an 85-90 minute mash for my full volume no sparge brew. I am brewing an 11.5L batch. Any thoughts on this?
 
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Following instructions, I usually do a full volume no sparge mash at 75 minutes for a recipe that requires a 60 minute mash. I assume the extra 15 minutes is to replace the “no sparge” However, my next brew is the Dead Pony Club and that requires a 75 minute mash followed by the sparge. So, I am thinking that I should do an 85-90 minute mash for my full volume no sparge brew. I am brewing an 11.5L batch. Any thoughts on this?
Are you doing BIAB?
 

colm89

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I usually just mash until I hit my target pre boil gravity personally, or up to an hour maximum, but I rarely do very big beers where efficiency suffers.

I once done an imperial stout and mashed for 90 mins.
 

colm89

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I should say I also do a full volume biab mash with no sparge, but I build my recipe on the assumption that my efficiency is 60-65%
 
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Yes, I am doing BIAB. I have just edited my post to say that the Dead Pony is mashed for 75 minutes at 62%
I usually mash until conversion is complete. I use iodine to test if starch is still present. Surprisingly conversion can take as little as half an hour, 40 mins.
 

davidgrace

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I have to say something about efficiency. I use a Peco boiler for mashing wrapped in insulating foil and covered at the top. The boiler is in standby for the mash so not overheating. My first brew in the Peco with a 75 minute mash turned out at 1070 OG rather than the 1060 estimated OG. I added water before pitching the yeast to bring it down a little. Since, then, I have done 4 brews and they have all been well over the estimated OG. I had to add water each time. Should I be very unhappy with these high OG readings and any suggestions on the way forward?
 
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smcc

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I have to say something about efficiency. I use a Peco boiler for mashing wrapped in insulating foil and covered at the top. My first brew in the Peco with a 75 minute mash turned out at 1070 OG rather than the 1060 estimated OG. I added water before pitching the yeast to bring it down a little. Since, then, I have done 4 brews and they have all been well over the estimated OG. I had to add water each time. Should I be very unhappy with these high OG readings and any suggestions on the way forward?
Every brewer is happy to have increased gravity, I guess my question is how you are calculating your malt requirements to meet target ABV. Each malt has a specific extract figure which used in calculations will usually get you close, when I did my course we had brewsheets where you plug in the targets and malts and it will tell you the quantities needed to hit target.
 

davidgrace

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I just add the grains as stated in the recipe. I think the volume of water I am using results in the high OG. I am so careful to hit my OG that I think I am putting in too little water. I recently brewed a Wainwright Gold Mashing at 66 C for 75 minutes. My full volume water was 17.5L and the OG turned out at 1046 rather than the expected 1042. half a litre before pitching the yeast.

Grains

The left figure is for a 23L the right for my 11.5L

Maris Otter 3680g 1840g

Flaked Oats 154g 77g

Wheat Malt 154g 77g

Rye Malt 154g 77g

Black Malt 13g 7g
 
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