Fullers 1845

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by Drunkula, Nov 29, 2018.

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  1. Nov 29, 2018 #1

    Drunkula

    Drunkula

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    I'm culturing up from 1845 at the moment. I accidentally turned the plate off overnight and there's about 4mm of yeast in the bottom of a caffetiere so it's really coming along. Two bottle dregs straight into a litre of 1.040 spraymalt wort, and I forgot about yeast nutrient.

    Have you tried the 1845 yeast before? I'll do the Gales strain, too. What's it like, and what beers should I be looking at to make with it? Thanks.
     
  2. Nov 29, 2018 #2

    MyQul

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    I created a new thread for this (as you can see)

    Yes I've cultured up the Fullers strain before, in fact I have a bottle of 1845 in my fridge at the moment to culture up.

    It has a very distinctive ester flavour. Im not very good at describing flavours but others have described it as marmalade(y). It's great in anything English, bitters, stouts, milds etc. It's super flucculant and leave a clear beer quickly. Be a bit careful with it though as it has a tendancy to overcarbonate in the bottle. No problem with kegs though as you can vent.
     
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  3. Nov 30, 2018 #3

    Drunkula

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    Oh, thanks for the carbonation note as I'd probably have overdone it. Marmalade sounds great. I really messed up a chocolate orange beer recently and it could be good when I redo it. I'll do a mild or a bitter with the 1845.

    Man alive you're right about it being flocculant. I took it off the stir plate about 40 minutes ago and put it in the fridge and there's loads on the bottom already. I had a taste of the wort when I took a gravity sample and it is lovely. It's got a fruitcakey taste and that's just with extra dark spraymalt. I am really looking forward to whatever I make with this.

    What's the Gale's yeast like? I've read the Fuller's page on, and I know you like it. I'll be culturing up a HSB for sure.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2018
  4. Nov 30, 2018 #4

    MyQul

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    The Gales strain is another classic English style strain. It's quite fruity at the top end of the fermetation temps. I read somewhere or other that it gives a 'Dundee cake' flavour (which after googling I discovered is a kind of fruit cake) When I made an ESB with it, their was a definate fruit cake taste to the beer. But not so much with lower OG beers (although definately fruity)
    Whenever I open a bottle of beer make with this strain, the immediate aroma remindes of an old school pub. I think it's because the Gales strain is a Whitbread B derivative. A classic, and widely used by brewerys up and down the country, strain
    I have also discoved it's got a decent fermentation temp range. I tend not to use fermenation control, and have used the strain from 16.5C - 20C (ambient)
    I defenately think you'll like the Gales strain
     
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  5. Dec 5, 2018 #5

    Drunkula

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    MyQul, as the litre starter had brewed out I made a hop tea and bottled the spent wort with it, then put in a fresh litre of wort. Within an hour it was frothing, 36 hours it had brewed out and I cold crashed it and had maybe trebled what yeast I already had. Doing some fag packet calcs I reckon I've got over 300 billion cells now.

    Then I poured off some of the starter to taste it and no lie it was as good as 90 percent of the pub beers I've ever had. No bittering, just extra dark spraymalt. It was gorgeous, like a lovely Scottish ale. It made me think sod real brewing, I could just continually make demijohns on the stir plate.

    Either making a simple Pedigree clone tomorrow, or Speckled Hen. And I'm doing a split wheat beer experiment with 3 different yeasts - CML Kristalweizen, S-33 and the Fuller's. The first two I've already done and were great so using an English ale strain is seeing how far I can muck about before it becomes terrible.

    Cheers.
     
  6. Dec 5, 2018 #6

    terrym

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    1845 is available in some Sainsburys in our area, but not others. Its also supposed to be in Waitrose but I couldn't see any. Apparently on offer in both.
    Now got two bottles, one for a culture and one to compare to 1698.
     
  7. Dec 5, 2018 #7

    terrym

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    Not using a Pedigree bottle culture?
     
  8. Dec 5, 2018 #8

    Drunkula

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    Didn't know it was bottle conditioned. Might do it in the future. The three way wheat is happening instead because my EKG didn't turn up.
     
  9. Dec 5, 2018 #9

    jjsh

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    I read somewhere (and I wish I'd bookmarked it because typically now I can't find it!) that it isn't the primary strain in Peddy but a bottling yeast.
     
  10. Dec 5, 2018 #10

    MyQul

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    I think I read somewhere that too. I have a bottle of Marstons 1977 jubilee ale amongst my remaining 8 jubilee ales
     
  11. Dec 5, 2018 #11

    MyQul

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    Interesting experiment athumb..

    I like the way you bottled the spent wort rather than wasting it. I usually chuck it after tasting it to make sure it's ok
     
  12. Dec 8, 2018 #12

    Llamaman

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    Often £6 for 4 from Ocado, with ESB, London Pride, London Porter and Bengal Lancer also in the offer.
    Alas, only the Lancer, 1845 and Golden Pride (the 8.5% monster) are bottle conditioned.
    Fullers ESB, alongside Vocation Life and Death, are my favourite supermarket ‘school night’ beers.
     
  13. Dec 10, 2018 at 10:48 AM #13

    Drunkula

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    This yeast is a thermal detonator. In a big chest freezer in an open, cold shed it's pushed itself to 23.9c. I've had to actually turn on the cooling switch on the STC. I didn't bother because I thought there would be absolutely no point. Going to have to try and find out how London ESB 1968 / WLP 002 behave at higher temps.

    This could turn out to be a bit of a fruity bugger.

    EDIT: There was some corrosion on the audio connector where it attaches to my STC changing the resistance. Everything above is pure lies.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 2:15 PM

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