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Leard

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Can we expect really cheap British hops at the moment then? I'd happily buy a load of British hops if they're going cheap.
 

An Ankoù

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To be effective, we would need to get back to using proper English hops: Goldings and Fuggles, Challenger, Bramling Cross, Pioneer, Endeavour, WGV, etc, etc. We have some very fine hops. Let's stop pretending that these alco-pops that look and taste like milk shakes really count as beer. Let's brew our Pilsners with Fuggles - they make a delicious lager. English hops (I'm not away that hops are grown in other parts of the s.t.b.d-UK) are brilliant. I've only found one French hop to step up to the mark for a decent bitter or pale ale and that's Aramis. (I haven't tried Triskell yet, but I think I've done all the others). If the UK is to become truly "independent" you've got to start encouraging the "Made in Britain" brand and help get our production base mobilised.
 

jjsh

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So, where is this massive surplus of hops, eh? I've just logged onto Charles Faram's website and there doesn't appear to be any massive fire sales of hops. Beware the farmer rattling his subsidy collection plate ~ his tale is rarely the full story. For instance, don't the large brewers buy their hops as futures? Surely most of this years crop are already sold.....

I'm not saying that, like the rest of the economy, hop growers aren't feeling the pinch, but this demand for tax payers cash will be the opening gambit in a negotiation. I would like to see evidence of hop prices tanking before the state starts to hand out my (or more likely, my children's) cash.
 

An Ankoù

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So, where is this massive surplus of hops, eh? I've just logged onto Charles Faram's website and there doesn't appear to be any massive fire sales of hops. Beware the farmer rattling his subsidy collection plate ~ his tale is rarely the full story. For instance, don't the large brewers buy their hops as futures? Surely most of this years crop are already sold.....

I'm not saying that, like the rest of the economy, hop growers aren't feeling the pinch, but this demand for tax payers cash will be the opening gambit in a negotiation. I would like to see evidence of hop prices tanking before the state starts to hand out my (or more likely, my children's) cash.
You're right enough there, and I understand that a considerable proportion of the worldwide hop crop is converted into hop extract for the mega breweries.
 

Brew_DD2

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Barring one or two varieties, I just don't find British hops to have desirable characteristics for my tastes. I really like EKG and Challenger and that's about it.
 

nickjdavis

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To be effective, we would need to get back to using proper English hops: Goldings and Fuggles, Challenger, Bramling Cross, Pioneer, Endeavour, WGV, etc, etc. We have some very fine hops. Let's stop pretending that these alco-pops that look and taste like milk shakes really count as beer. Let's brew our Pilsners with Fuggles - they make a delicious lager. English hops (I'm not away that hops are grown in other parts of the s.t.b.d-UK) are brilliant. I've only found one French hop to step up to the mark for a decent bitter or pale ale and that's Aramis. (I haven't tried Triskell yet, but I think I've done all the others). If the UK is to become truly "independent" you've got to start encouraging the "Made in Britain" brand and help get our production base mobilised.
I'm using Aramis in a blonde Biere de Garde in a few weeks time.

Used Barbe Rouge in an Amber BdG...gave some nice subtle red fruit flavours...could work in some darker English ales.
 

An Ankoù

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I'm using Aramis in a blonde Biere de Garde in a few weeks time.
rbe ROug
Used Barbe Rouge in an Amber BdG...gave some nice subtle red fruit flavours...could work in some darker English ales.
I've got about 150 g from a 250 g pack of Barbe Rouge left and I've tried it in three different styles. Been disappointed every time. It's no good for a bitter or light ale. it's supposed to give red berries and strawberries, but it required some imagination. I think I'll just use them for bittering and rely on other hops for a bit of hoppiness.
I don't think you'll be disappointed with Aramis, though. I could easily have mistaken them for a classic English hop.
 

Northern_Brewer

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I've only found one French hop to step up to the mark for a decent bitter or pale ale and that's Aramis. (I haven't tried Triskell yet, but I think I've done all the others)
A lot of commercial brewers swear by French Fuggles for its aroma compared to English Fuggles.

It's still Fuggles though.... #teamgoldings

AIUI part of the problem is that brewers have got used to English hops being available on the spot market, so haven't been contracting them forward enough, which doesn't give the farmers the confidence to stick with them.

Big fan of the likes of Bramling Cross and Bullion though, aside from Goldings, Flyer's an interesting one to try in dark beers if you can find it.
 

Binkei Huckaback

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If the UK is to become truly "independent" you've got to start encouraging the "Made in Britain" brand and help get our production base mobilised.
Most of the major brands of lager are already brewed in the UK. By foreign owned conglomerates with the profit flowing out of the UK. Somehow I don't think you'll persuade your average lager drinker to switch from Stella Artois, Fosters or Kronenbourg to switch to an English Pilsner made with fuggles
 

An Ankoù

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Most of the major brands of lager are already brewed in the UK. By foreign owned conglomerates with the profit flowing out of the UK. Somehow I don't think you'll persuade your average lager drinker to switch from Stella Artois, Fosters or Kronenbourg to switch to an English Pilsner made with fuggles
I don't think drinkers of Stella, Fosters and Kronembourg really give a damn anyway.
 

Cheshire Cat

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Most of the major brands of lager are already brewed in the UK. By foreign owned conglomerates with the profit flowing out of the UK. Somehow I don't think you'll persuade your average lager drinker to switch from Stella Artois, Fosters or Kronenbourg to switch to an English Pilsner made with fuggles
We need to start supporting
1. Owned and made in Britain I.e. not Dyson Etc
2. Taxed in Britain ie not Amazon Etc
 

Satellitemark

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We need to go further than that , we need to boycott any manufacturers that abandon UK production, a prime example would be if they took production of the new defender style 4x4 to france and even more so for lower price ticket everyday items like Cadbury chocolate made in Poland etc.
I'm not at all against imported stuff , just British brands and products being made abroad and sold here.
HP sauce is another one made in the Netherlands.

Mark
 

chuffer

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unfortunately, British hops don't tend to
Barring one or two varieties, I just don't find British hops to have desirable characteristics for my tastes. I really like EKG and Challenger and that's about it.
I'm with you. I will use traditional british hops in darker maltier beers but if I'me done a pale ale, I don't find earthy/grassy hops very desirable, I'd rather have a bold, fruity flavour for my light beers and I don't know many british hops that can offer that
 

Rodcx500z

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I,m brewing today strikes on as i type, ekg, challenger and fuggles a nice english pale ale yeah, come on get the kettles out athumb..
 

An Ankoù

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unfortunately, British hops don't tend to

I'm with you. I will use traditional british hops in darker maltier beers but if I'me done a pale ale, I don't find earthy/grassy hops very desirable, I'd rather have a bold, fruity flavour for my light beers and I don't know many british hops that can offer that
I wonder if we know our British hops that well. A quick look here:
Olicana, Jester, Minstrel are hops that seem to have some of the characteristics of some of the New World hops. I must confess, I've never tried them, but I think it's about time I did. Except that i've gone off American style overhopped beers and mango-flavoured milk shakes. That's not to say my fellow drinkers necessarily share my preference for more tradional beers.
 

chuffer

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I wonder if we know our British hops that well. A quick look here:
Olicana, Jester, Minstrel are hops that seem to have some of the characteristics of some of the New World hops. I must confess, I've never tried them, but I think it's about time I did. Except that i've gone off American style overhopped beers and mango-flavoured milk shakes. That's not to say my fellow drinkers necessarily share my preference for more tradional beers.
you're quite right - my ignorance has been shown! I shall indeed give Olicana, Jester and Minstrel a whirl if they give flavour/aroma as described in that article - thanks
 
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