Has anyone read this expensive book?

Discussion in 'Brewing Books & Publications' started by jceg316, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. Oct 31, 2017 #1

    jceg316

    jceg316

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    This came up on my recommendations on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Principles...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PFXQDKJWZAA0Z3QB631Y it claims to go into the science of beer, which sounds really interesting and I would like to know more about the science behind brewing. However, I have bought some books before which don't go into any detail whatsoever and are disappointing.

    Whilst most those bad books have been really cheap, I've not really wasted a great deal of money (a few quid here and there). But £23 is quite steep. I was wondering if anyone has read it and can recommend it and reckons it's value for money.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Oct 31, 2017 #2

    strange-steve

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    I haven't read it yet but it's definitely on my read list, I've heard it's great. Like you, the price has put me off thus far, but I'll treat myself someday.
     
  3. Oct 31, 2017 #3

    MyQul

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    You can get a used copy for £12.65. When I used to buy books (in the days before I had a kindle) the used books I bought from amazon were almost as good as new, they just weren't brand spanking new so couldnt be sold as new
     
  4. Oct 31, 2017 #4

    nigelnorris

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    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17hgrt8RQ20[/ame]
     
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  5. Oct 31, 2017 #5

    Gerryjo

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  6. Nov 1, 2017 #6

    Sadfield

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    I have it. Shop around and buy it cheaper. If you are interested in brewing science I wouldn't want to dissuade anyone from buying it. However, I would class myself as reasonably educated with A-levels and a degree. Sadly my science A-level wasn't chemistry, and although I found this book informative I wouldn't say it made me a better brewer. In the same way that I doubt most good mechanics understand the finer details of thermodynamics. Based on my own inadequacies, I'd say it provides the theory behind stuff you probably instinctively know.

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  7. Nov 1, 2017 #7

    jceg316

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    Thank you everyone for your replies, really useful.

    @sadfield it's interesting what you say. In my head I'm comparing this to the Yeast book by Chris White which goes into a lot of science, but at some point that science made me better at brewing.
     
  8. Nov 1, 2017 #8

    johnnyboy1965

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    Brewing science is a bit of a "niche". You`re either into it or not. It probably will make your brewing experience better.

    Johnnyboys Top Tip....A ex-girlfriend of mine ( librarian/scholar/English/French Grad) once told me that if the author of a book feels the need to put his/her qualifications after his name, its not worth reading and you should do your own research...... just saying

    Ive just checked this out and its true
     
  9. Nov 1, 2017 #9

    nigelnorris

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    I've just found an electronic copy of this, amongst a bunch of others that someone gave me.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Oxford-Com...9562613&sr=8-1&keywords=oxford+companion+beer

    Insanely detailed and I'll can't see myself ever bothering with it. I'll stick with How to Brew, and some people claim that is too technical.

    Actually looking again mine's an updated 2012 version of it, presumably without some of the mistakes everyone seems to moan about in the reviews.
     
  10. Nov 1, 2017 #10

    Sadfield

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    That may also be the case with this book, as your head could well be better suited than mine. I really should revisit it.
     
  11. Nov 26, 2017 #11

    MrRook

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    Maybe your local library has a copy.
     
  12. Nov 27, 2017 #12

    GerritT

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  13. Nov 27, 2017 #13

    dad_of_jon

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    I think this applies to cooking - heston blumental (science) vs nigella lawson (instinct?) You can brew successfully scientifically or by being an artisan or somewhere inbetween.

    I know science e.g. strange steves water thread and water treatment guide will make better beer. :thumb: steve. Due to various constraints I know what I can 'chuck in' to hit the mark for me. I will one day treat myself to steve's techniques. Of course once you enjoy the improved result it would be tough to go back. That's the same debate often about extract vs all grain.

    I suppose its the best I can brew vs the quickest I can brew something can enjoy drinking 20 litres of :wink:
     
  14. Nov 27, 2017 #14

    jceg316

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    Yeah I agree with you that there is a balance between the science and "art" side of brewing. I'm probably more on the "art" side but every so often it's really interesting to read the science side, it helps my art.
     
  15. Nov 27, 2017 #15

    Sadfield

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    Sometimes I wear a lab coat, sometimes a silk dressing gown.

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