Have a go at simple AG

Discussion in 'Beer Brewing "How-To" Guides' started by clibit, Feb 16, 2015.

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  1. May 26, 2019 #1541

    TL4244

    TL4244

    TL4244

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    I followed the suggested method at the start of this thread and made 2 batches (although I used cascade hops on 1 batch) and a week in the fermentation seems to have finished and (considering it is at room temperature and just out of the FV) the results taste good (when taking an SG reading are you supposed to put the sample back, throw it away or is drinking it considered acceptable?). It is certainly far better that the 2 kits I have attempted (and not been pleased with the results - muntons premium larger which is far too dark for a larger).

    I was thinking of trying the see what different the various malts make, is it OK to boil 2 batches 1 with just base malt and another with say crystal malt and then mix in different proportions to get several different compositions to then ferment and try, it would be a lot less work than trying to boil several batches?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
  2. May 26, 2019 #1542

    the_quick

    the_quick

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    Chuck the sample, as you are risking an infection.
    I would leave it in fermentor for 2 weeks at least. It allows for beer to clear. If you have second bucket, transfer to it for packaging, leaving behind all the trub. I haven't used one at the beginning, but now use it for every beer - makes a huge difference.

    You always need most of base malts - those would be your pale malt, pale marris otter, pilsner malts etc. Crystal, caramel, chocolate, roasted and so one are addition malts, for coloring and give sweeter taste to some beers.
    On brewers friend you can search for lots of recipes for free, it is great resource
     
  3. May 27, 2019 #1543

    TL4244

    TL4244

    TL4244

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    Hi, Thanks for the advice.

    I have seen a vast array of recipes, but I do not know what the different malts taste like and hence I can not work out which to try, I know I could try some and see how they work out, but as I (will soon) have the ability to boil a 20l batch and a 5l batch (finished volumes) at the same time I was contemplating making a 20l batch with just 4kg of pale malt (+ hops) and a 5l batch with 750g pale malt and 250g crystal malt then mixing in different quantities to get different blends of pale and crystal malt e.g. 5 different batches each of 5l that would have from 0g to 100g of crystal malt, I could then find out what the different concentrations taste like (and then try it with different malts). Is is possible to mix worts like this post boil?

    Thanks
     
  4. May 27, 2019 #1544

    JohnB

    JohnB

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    @TL4244 Hi, I find the joy of home brewing is to experiment, and what you are suggesting is a good idea. I like your idea of making test batches from one main brew. Perhaps you might like to Google the word parti-gyle it is a term used by the big brewhouses to get two or more beers from one large batch of base wort by adding varying adjuncts after the base wort has been divided up.

    There are a couple of vids on youtube describing and showing a howto parti-gyle in small batches. Well worth a look and a good starting point for what you are proposing. In one vid the guys at "basic brewing", James Spencer and Steve Wilkes do an excellent job of teaching the basics of parti-gyle, making 3 different beers from one batch of wort.
     
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  5. May 28, 2019 #1545

    TL4244

    TL4244

    TL4244

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    @JohnB Thank you for the info - I have had a look at the videos and they provide some good information. I will give it a go and see how it turns out.
     
  6. May 31, 2019 #1546

    Markk

    Markk

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    I think have all the equipment I need to give the brew in the OP a go except a thermometer and straining bag so I'm really tempted to pick these up and give this a go when my FV is free. One small point, the OP is so old I am finding it impossible to find a KG of Maris Otter anywhwere for a pound fifty now! :)
     
  7. May 31, 2019 #1547

    dleary

    dleary

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  8. Jun 1, 2019 #1548

    Markk

    Markk

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  9. Jun 18, 2019 at 2:48 PM #1549

    Hengoedbrewer

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    I had my first go at BIAB on Sunday 9th June. It was the first time I have brewed in best part of 2 yrs so I was a bit nervous anyway, plus it being an entirely new process, and I had spent a fair bit getting the ingredients /mash bag / new pot together, and didn’t want to mess it up!

    As it was a first attempt I went for a 10 litre simple single hop (Citra) with 2kg Maris Otter and 250g light Crystal Malt, using a portable induction heater to brew on rather than our brand new main induction hob. It all went relatively well, I think. The induction hob heated the strike water-6.5 L of bottled Aldi water- to 70c in a few minutes. From there I mashed in half the MO and all the light Crystal malt, and stirred for about 10 minutes, adding the remaining MO afterward with another 10 min stir. The Temp fell to 63.2c, I think due to a long time stirring, so I added about a litre of hot from the kettle, then wrapped the pot in a towel. The mash temp when I checked it an hour later was 62, so perhaps a little low to mash- this means I might get a thinner end beer as I understand it?? but seeing a video on Youtube which indicated that mash temp is not always super critical; and as it was a first go; I tried not to worry too much.

    Once 60 mins was up, I drained the bag for a few minutes and then batch sparged, both in a spare FV. Sparge was a further 6.5L of bottled water at room temp (easier for me as I only have one induction suitable pot for now, and another video told me that using cold water actually makes very little difference when sparging). I squeezed the bag like hell and by the end managed to get about 13L in total from the initial drain and batch sparge. I didn’t tie the bag tight enough during sparge and so some of the grains ended up loose in the fermenter, which I will note next time. I also neglected to take a pre boil OG which I will again remember to do next time.

    The induction hob got the wort to a good strong boil easily enough and maintained it. I added 15g of Citra at 60 mins to bitter, then a further 20g at 5 mins, then a final 10g once wort had dropped to 80c. From here came the worst part- it took absolutely AGES for the wort to get down to borderline yeast pitching temp, probably about 2 hours. I used about 3/4 of a pack of Safale US05 sprinkled over. I don’t have a chiller and was using just the sink of cold water method. Next time I will begin to cool immediately rather than waiting for it to drop to 80c on it’s own and THEN cooling, to try and speed things up. I eventually pitched yeast at about 7pm when wort was at 20.2c, making it a very long first BIAB brew day overall (about 6.5 hours). Before pitching I strained the wort using a sterilised sieve into a second sterilised FV. The OG was 1.054, which was higher than I was expecting as I had guessed at only about 65% efficiency, but I did as I say squeeze the bag thoroughly a few times! I ended up with about 10.5L of wort in total following the boil. Sample was darker than I was expecting, and didn’t smell all that hoppy. I didn’t taste at this stage. I popped the FV in a water bath, and connected up an inkbird set to heat if temp dropped below 20c, with the probe taped to the side of the bucket and insulated with bubble wrap over the top. The water bath was popped it into the porch, which is the coolest room in the house, with no radiator, and a black rubbish bag over the top to keep the sun off it. We went away for a week on the following day until the 17th, when I came back I had a quick look the CO2 had pushed the lid up- there didn’t seem to be any krausen which has worried me slightly but apparently it depends on yeast, ferment temp, etc, so have left it alone.

    It has now been fermenting for 9 days as I type. Will check gravity on Sunday (meaning 14 days in FV), and then dry hop with a further 15 or 20g of citra for 3-5 days once I know fermentation has finished. I will then bottle with about 70g of table sugar in a priming solution, leave for 2 weeks in my garage to condition, then sample.

    Overall- no boil overs or disasters I don’t think, looking forward to tasting…I hope it ends up okay as it was a long day; which hopefully I can reduce next time. I plan on doing a BIAB stout next, incorporating some of the lessons learned this time, with the aim of a quicker brew day, as not sure how many days I will have the luxury of no toddler running round my legs for that long!


    Cheers!
     

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