Help needed to handle Dorsets hard water for Lager

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by Marcus Roper, Jul 2, 2019.

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  1. Jul 11, 2019 #21

    darkbright

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    I definitely would recommend having a look at RO water. I use a compact 4 stage from Vyair and cut my tap water with that. I use the Brew'n water spread sheet to get everything into range and then use 75% phophotic acid for the mash pH.

    RO water needs good water pressure, however.
     
  2. Jul 11, 2019 #22

    SaintKel

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    Personally wouldn’t bother with an RO filter, used to take me approx 45 mins- 1 hr to get 25 litres and approx 75 litres waste. Local fish shop sells it at £3:50 for 25 litres. Used to strip a 450 ppm hardness down to single figures so does do the job if you’re up for the hassle/waste.
     
  3. Jul 11, 2019 #23

    GerritT

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    Then give those bottles a second use, will ya?
     
  4. Jul 11, 2019 #24

    Oneflewover

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    I do where possible - 5l plastic bottles are useful for small batch brewing and for refilling to take on camping trips etc., But you can only use so many of them....
     
  5. Jul 11, 2019 #25

    Oneflewover

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    Think I'll give this a go. There's a live fish shop not too far away
     
  6. Jul 13, 2019 #26

    SaintKel

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    I think it’s the easiest way, I have an RO filter still but for 3:50 for 25 litres it’s an easy decision.
     
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  7. Jul 13, 2019 #27

    BeerCat

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    Bought some lactic acid and put a drop in a glass of water and hated the taste so never used it. I brew with RO water and about 3% acid malt for my lagers. Never ever brewed with tap water.
     
  8. Jul 13, 2019 #28

    strange-steve

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    For the tiny amount of lactic acid you'd need I'd be very surprised if you could taste in in the finished beer. In fact acid malt is coated in lactic acid anyway, so technically you're still using it :D
     
  9. Jul 13, 2019 #29

    BeerCat

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    Yes I knowbut you can chew on acid malt and it tastes OK. I read somewhere of people using lactic to increase sourness in beer. Perhaps I am just sensitive to the taste.
     
  10. Jul 16, 2019 #30

    SaintKel

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    I usually taste test malt but I spat this one out!
     
  11. Jul 16, 2019 #31

    An Ankoù

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    Back in the days before chemistry sets were invented, a region's beer was dictated by its water supply- so bitter from Burton, dark beers from areas with lots of carbonate and bicarbonate etc. Have you looked into what can be made using the water as it is?
    Lager doesn't have to be pilsner, which uses very soft water. I understand the pale beers (lagers) from Dortmund in Germany use horrendously hard water. Check out the water profiles here:
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/brewing-water-target-profiles/
    Before I was too concerned about water chemistry I used to brew with untreated Upper Parkstone water and made some great beers. True, I wasn't really a lager drinker and the lagers I did make tasted more like very pale bitters then, which suited me down to the ground.
    There's a world of difference between brewing an excellent beer with the stuff at hand and copying a beer brewed elsewhere.
     
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