Herfstbok recipe?

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Hi all, I'm thinking about brewing a bock as my first brew in the new year. I have a recipe from GH, however as I really like a herfstbok, I was wondering if anyone has a recipe they wouldn't mind sharing? This is my first venture brewing this style so it should be fun 🤣.
 

Northern_Brewer

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Ron Pattinson is quite a fan of Dutch boks and has written a fair bit about them, including some recipes for pre-war ones and detailed data on those at the 2015 bok festival :
 

chthon

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Ron Pattinson is quite a fan of Dutch boks and has written a fair bit about them, including some recipes for pre-war ones and detailed data on those at the 2015 bok festival :
To be fair to him, he really is a fan of German bock, and he acknowledges that there are a couple of Dutch bocks which approach German bocks in taste and quality.
 

Dorst

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I remember drafting a recipe for you in the past:

For those interested in brewing a bockbier here is my stab at it ;-)

Original Gravity: 1.067
Final Gravity (Adv): 1.017
IBU (Tinseth): 25
BU/GU: 0.37
Colour: 40.5 EBC

Malts (6.225 kg)
3.1 kg (49.8%) — Weyermann Munich I — Grain — 14 EBC
2.5 kg (40.2%) — Weyermann Pilsner — Grain — 3.3 EBC
500 g (8%) — Weyermann Caramunich II — Grain — 124 EBC
125 g (2%) — Thomas Fawcett Chocolate Malt — Grain — 1000 EBC

Hops (55 g)
15 g (19 IBU) — Magnum 12% — Boil — 60 min
40 g
(6 IBU) — Hallertauer Mittelfrueh 4% — Boil — 10 min

Yeast
2 pkg — Fermentis S-189 SafLager German Lager 84%

You could replace the yeast with something Belgian abbey as well or a general German ale yeast like Fermentis K97.
The style is quite broad and does not really have many guidelines other than that the Original Gravity needs to be at least Plato 15.5 (SG 1.063). In the early 20th century you saw a heavy decline in the Dutch ale culture and ales were rapidly being replaced by lagers (pilsner). Many of the older breweries shut down, were bought and consolidated, or simply converted to making lagers. After WW2 you saw an even quicker decline in the number of breweries and almost all of them made pilsner (some of them Dort). Bockbier was brewed once a year as a specialty by these breweries - so they would have been lagers.

We always had a big influence of Belgian beer in the Netherlands. They carved out a niche for themselves with cafés that only served "special beers" (not lagers) in the 1970s. This quickly caught on and led to breweries adopting many of the Belgian sensibilities into their beers. This lead to many variants that were top fermented with Belgian ale yeasts. Belgians don't really drink bockbier, but some clever manufacturers just rebadged their dubbel to bock (or at least made very little attempt to alter it) and export it to the Dutch market. At this moment you see most mass market manufacturers (Heineken, Grolsch, Amstel, Dommelsch, Hertog Jan etc.) use lager yeast while the smaller/more craft breweries use top fermenting yeast (Jopen, La Trappe, 't ij, de Molen etc.).
 
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I remember drafting a recipe for you in the past:



The style is quite broad and does not really have many guidelines other than that the Original Gravity needs to be at least Plato 15.5 (SG 1.063). In the early 20th century you saw a heavy decline in the Dutch ale culture and ales were rapidly being replaced by lagers (pilsner). Many of the older breweries shut down, were bought and consolidated, or simply converted to making lagers. After WW2 you saw an even quicker decline in the number of breweries and almost all of them made pilsner (some of them Dort). Bockbier was brewed once a year as a specialty by these breweries - so they would have been lagers.

We always had a big influence of Belgian beer in the Netherlands. They carved out a niche for themselves with cafés that only served "special beers" (not lagers) in the 1970s. This quickly caught on and led to breweries adopting many of the Belgian sensibilities into their beers. This lead to many variants that were top fermented with Belgian ale yeasts. Belgians don't really drink bockbier, but some clever manufacturers just rebadged their dubbel to bock (or at least made very little attempt to alter it) and export it to the Dutch market. At this moment you see most mass market manufacturers (Heineken, Grolsch, Amstel, Dommelsch, Hertog Jan etc.) use lager yeast while the smaller/more craft breweries use top fermenting yeast (Jopen, La Trappe, 't ij, de Molen etc.).
Hi Dorst,

Sorry, had forgotten you had sent that previously. This is something I keep thinking about brewing, then can't decide on. Since posting my question here I've sourced ingredients to make a Hansel Dunkel (CML recipe). I kept going between doing a simple bock to a darker version (GH's recipes), but decided to have a go at this instead. Will file your recipe away as this sounds good👍. Many thanks for the brief history.... my Dutch in-laws enjoy their Trappist beers. I will drink quite pills when offered but always love a dark bock. I'll slowly experiment with these over the next year🍻🍻
 
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