Hop tea maximum grams?

Help Support The HomeBrew Forum:

BeerisGOD

Landlord.
Joined
Feb 27, 2016
Messages
1,436
Reaction score
338
Im aware you can go mad with dry hopping but would of hops for a hop tea excessive? Im planning on using the rest of my centinial and cascade and believe its around 80g in total.
The plan was a 30 min steep in 65c water.
I cant see a problem but thought id see what everyone else thought.
The ibu is around 35 so any extra bitterness wouldnt be a concern.

Cheers
 

terrym

Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Messages
7,487
Reaction score
4,313
Location
North Sussex
My understanding is that a there is no bitterness infused when you make up a hop tea or when you add hops at 'flameout' or if there is bitterness added it is minimal.
If you make up a hop tea you will need to add enough water so that there is just enough liquid to absorb the hoppy goodness and yet not too much so that you end up diluting the beer. I use 100ml water for every 10g hops. I use cooled boiled water water at 85*C and just allow it to cool before it goes into the beer. In my view if the start temperature is any less than that the hop extraction will be reduced, added to which any evaporation of the lower boiling hop oils will be minimal compared to lower tempertures, given its a cooling activity not a sustained period at the high temperature.
Personally I have found there is little difference between a hop tea and a dry hop in terms of flavour or aroma contribution, so normally just do a dry hop for 6 days, or occasionally make up a hop tea and chuck the lot in, tea and hop bits, and then leave it for the six days.
Finally the amount of hops you use is all down to personal taste, what one person may find is too much the next may find not enough. So you just have to go on past experience or go with your instincts
 

BeerisGOD

Landlord.
Joined
Feb 27, 2016
Messages
1,436
Reaction score
338
Cheers terry
Id never of thought adding a hop tea days before bottling.
Got myself a french press from wilkos for six quid so looking forward to using this.

http://www.wilko.com/teapots-mugs/wilko-glass-cafetiere-800ml/invt/0409319?nst=0&gclid=CjwKCAiAlL_UBRBoEiwAXKgW58jeo6yTtVG06Z56NoCDswHNhuhIrcWpy6-zoSbngqhgQacR2HaVmxoCMisQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

If there isnt a great deal of difference between a hop tea and dry in terms of flavour and aroma i can see hop teas a lot easier/convenient for home brewers all round.
 
Last edited:

private4587

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
438
Reaction score
56
Location
Middlesbrough
My understanding is that a there is no bitterness infused when you make up a hop tea or when you add hops at 'flameout' or if there is bitterness added it is minimal.
If you make up a hop tea you will need to add enough water so that there is just enough liquid to absorb the hoppy goodness and yet not too much so that you end up diluting the beer. I use 100ml water for every 10g hops. I use cooled boiled water water at 85*C and just allow it to cool before it goes into the beer. In my view if the start temperature is any less than that the hop extraction will be reduced, added to which any evaporation of the lower boiling hop oils will be minimal compared to lower tempertures, given its a cooling activity not a sustained period at the high temperature.
Personally I have found there is little difference between a hop tea and a dry hop in terms of flavour or aroma contribution, so normally just do a dry hop for 6 days, or occasionally make up a hop tea and chuck the lot in, tea and hop bits, and then leave it for the six days.
Finally the amount of hops you use is all down to personal taste, what one person may find is too much the next may find not enough. So you just have to go on past experience or go with your instincts
Hi Terry I hope that I'm reading your message correctly. I carryout a no chill method and am often worried about the flameout hops adding too much bitterness if added to my batch in no chill container. Could i therefore make up a hop tea with the correct amount of flameout hops and then add this to my fermenter when placing the wort from no chill container to fermenter?
 

terrym

Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Messages
7,487
Reaction score
4,313
Location
North Sussex
If there isnt a great deal of difference between a hop tea and dry in terms of flavour and aroma i can see hop teas a lot easier/convenient for home brewers all round.
Perhaps do you own experiment to compare the two methods and tell us what you found. :thumb:

Hi Terry I hope that I'm reading your message correctly. I carryout a no chill method and am often worried about the flameout hops adding too much bitterness if added to my batch in no chill container. Could i therefore make up a hop tea with the correct amount of flameout hops and then add this to my fermenter when placing the wort from no chill container to fermenter?
I think others who brew AG would be better placed to advise. However common sense dictates that if hot wort is in contact with hops there will be some bitterness extraction, but the extent of that is a function of time exposure and temperature.
However if you go the hop tea route I would do it after the primary has finished since you will otherwise lose some of the volatile hop oils due to CO2 stripping them out of solution.
But again you could do your own experiment to compare the two methods, at least to find out what suits you best.
 

private4587

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
438
Reaction score
56
Location
Middlesbrough
Thanks Terry as my hops is a 5min boil addition I intend to use a 20g teabag from CML in 200ml of boiled water cooled to approx <80*C and leave for 30min then add to fermenter after adding wort from no chill container.
 
Top