How do you find your recipes?

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Forgive me for being a gimp, but in this cains recipe, what does the % mean in terms of weight? :S
Nothing other than the % of the grain bill it represents... the # at the end suggests # its in lb. So in terms of 8lb grain bill the 3.5lb of Pale 2 row is 43% of the total...
 
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Forgive me for being a gimp, but in this cains recipe, what does the % mean in terms of weight? :S
Hi Arcs, have you got brewfather if so if you put in 4kg of pale malt it will also show it in percentage on the right, if you add all the grain up in the cains recipe it comes to 100%, i ain't no maths expert but i do understand what you mean
 

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Hi Arcs, have you got brewfather if so if you put in 4kg of pale malt it will also show it in percentage on the right, if you add all the grain up in the cains recipe it comes to 100%, i ain't no maths expert but i do understand what you mean
Nope, I bought a klarstein fullhorn bud. So if you could kindly list the exact weights i'd appreciate it as I want to buy the ingredients for this tomorrow, cheers !
 

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And 3.8 % abv seems low to me, afair cains was 4.1 or so more palt malt or add DME to bump the abv?
 

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Damnit, just as i go to buy my grains, alot is out of stock in some places for maris otter >< and lovebrewing doesn't even have some of the additional stuff i want bah - i sense the dark force is strong in this one :c
 
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Damnit, just as i go to buy my grains
Sign up for a Brewfather account (it's on-line brewing software, I think you were getting confused with Grainfather the brewing equipment!). You can use that to scale the recipe to your equipment and convert from pounds & gallons to kg and litres.
 

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It's interesting that the thread is about finding recipes and not formulating recipes. Does everyone cook directly from recipe books? Or do you learn from eating, what roughly goes into a dish, what individual ingredients taste of, the cooking processes required and then throw your own creations together?
 
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It's interesting that the thread is about finding recipes and not formulating recipes. Does everyone cook directly from recipe books? Or do you learn from eating, what roughly goes into a dish, what individual ingredients taste of, the cooking processes required and then throw your own creations together?
I usually get inspired to brew a style or particular beer. Then I use books, forums and apps to get a rough idea of the recipe and then use whatever I have to hand to approximate it on the Grainfather App.

If it looks right I will brew it.
 
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It's interesting that the thread is about finding recipes and not formulating recipes. Does everyone cook directly from recipe books? Or do you learn from eating, what roughly goes into a dish, what individual ingredients taste of, the cooking processes required and then throw your own creations together?
As I'm relatively new to AG brewing, I'm at the stage where I'm looking for recipes for beers I'd like to make. For some beers I've found 2-3 different versions and I've fitted the brew around my stocks. Having stumbled upon a very nice beer I'm now planning to start experimenting with the recipe to make it more to my taste. I guess this is what most of us do here....and it's what I do for cooking as well. Ultimately I will probably put together my own recipe one day, tho probably based on good brews I've done previously.
 

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It's interesting that the thread is about finding recipes and not formulating recipes. Does everyone cook directly from recipe books? Or do you learn from eating, what roughly goes into a dish, what individual ingredients taste of, the cooking processes required and then throw your own creations together?
usefull starting points. And ending points sometimes. ive lost count of the times I’ve tried to personalise and adapt and dial in a recipe and after about round 4 I’ve gone back to the original recipe as it was the best! I have a mixed bag trying to structure from scratch.

i cook a lot too, so for my staples have worked out my own recipes but will go to a recipe to refresh myself every now or then or if it’s something I don’t do often.
thing with cooking, you arent stuck with 40 meals if it doesn’t go to plan!
 
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I started off using David Heath Recipes as I brew on my Grainfather. I find all of his grainbills pretty spot on. I've started using Meanbrews as a resource as I've started more lagers and he goes in to pretty fine detail. Meanbrews obtains award winning recipes and averages out the ingredients and methods (mash & fermentation temps etc) hence the name.

I do play about with my own American IPAs though and have formulated a fair few that I've been chuffed with, but they all started off by learning to brew recipes which were great to begin with and moved on from there. Honestly, David Heath has been like a guiding hand on the shoulder for over a decade now, can't thank him enough.
 

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I've been doing all grain for 12 or 13 years now and I still do the basic stove top bag in a pan - I'm not an equipment fanatic, I struggle with gadgetry and DIY. It's recipes and ingredients and processes that interest me. There's room for a wide variety of brewers. I began by reading all about beers and recipes, and I continued reading and I still do! Creating my own recipes is a big part of the pleasure of brewing for me. I've got better at that with experience, and with research, and I can pretty much knock up a recipe in my head now for many beer styles.

How did I get here? Books and websites I suppose. Trusted sources. I only trusted recipes posted by home brewers online if I have good reason to trust them. Like plenty of endorsements from other people. I read and bought books. I used websites written by experienced brewers. I still refer to recipes quite often when I am creating a recipe. I may look at a few recipes for the style I want to brew, and take aspects from more than one. Put them into brewing software - I still use Brewmate which I started with years ago. Simple and it works. It will tell you how much water to use.

I think a very good tip is to keep recipes simple. I know a brewer who mostly brews beers with one malt and one hop variety and he brews them well. Two malts and two hops gives you many more permutations. Brewing and fermenting beer well with good ingredients is the most important thing I think. I have focused more and more on yeast and fermentation over the years. I think the biggest single thing that many competent home brewers can do to improve their beer is to buy good yeast and to pitch it in good condition. It's worth the extra effort, which isn't much. I've found some yeasts that make beers I really like a lot.

I've strayed a bit but for a reason hopefully. Some places listed below to find recipes to get you started, as well as the books mentioned like Hughes and Wheeler. Brewing forums are good sources as long as you pick carefully - go for the recipes that are discussed at length and receive positive feedback. HBTalk has some good recipes. Some brewery websites do provide recipes, or at least some information, like ingredients. If I remember any I'll post them! Sierra Nevada has its full Pale Ale recipe on its website, for one. And it's a really good recipe to use as a template. You can substitute an ingredient to good effect. It brews a beer that is hard to distinguish from the brewery version too.

byo.com/recipes
 
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Jamesman

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I've been doing all grain for 12 or 13 years now and I sill do the basic stove top bag in a pan - I'm not an equipment fanatic, I struggle with gadgetry and DIY. It's recipes and ingredients and processes that interest me. There's room for a wide variety of brewers. I began by reading all about beers and recipes, and I continued reading and I still do! Creating my own recipes is a big part of the pleasure of brewing for me. I've got better at that with experience, and with research, and I can pretty much knock up a recipe in my head now for many beer styles.

How did I get here? Books and websites I suppose. Trusted sources. I only trusted recipes posted by home brewers online if I have good reason to trust them. Like plenty of endorsements from other people. I read and bought books. I used websites written by experienced brewers. I still refer to recipes quite often when I am creating a recipe. I may look at a few recipes for the style I want to brew, and take aspects from more than one. Put them into brewing software - I still use Brewmate which I started with years ago. Simple and it works. It will tell you how much water to use.

I think a very good tip is to keep recipes simple. I know a brewer who mostly brews beers with one malt and one hop variety and he brews them well. Two malts and two hops gives you many more permutations. Brewing and fermenting beer well with good ingredients is the most important thing I think. I have focused more and more on yeast and fermentation over the years. I think the biggest single thing that many competent home brewers can do to improve their beer is to buy good yeast and to pitch it in good condition. It's worth the extra effort, which isn't much. I've found some yeasts that make beers I really like a lot.

I've strayed a bit but for a reason hopefully. Some places listed below to find recipes to get you started, as well as the books mentioned like Hughes and Wheeler. Brewing forums are good sources as long as you pick carefully - go for the recipes that are discussed at length and receive positive feedback. HBTalk has some good recipes. Some brewery websites do provide recipes, or at least some information, like ingredients. If I remember any I'll post them! Sierra Nevada has its full Pale Ale recipe on its website, for one. And it's a really good recipe to use as a template. You can substitute an ingredient to good effect. It brews a beer that is hard to distinguish from the brewery version too.

byo.com/recipes
Thanks for the links. Cheers.
 

Arcs

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Sign up for a Brewfather account (it's on-line brewing software, I think you were getting confused with Grainfather the brewing equipment!). You can use that to scale the recipe to your equipment and convert from pounds & gallons to kg and litres.
I wasn't confused at all between those two, just wasn't aware of anything that could do conversion rates like that. Thanks for the heads up !
 
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I'm about 8 brews into my AG career, 7 have been recipe kits as I get into the swing of things, my latest one, just cold crashing, is a bohemian pilsner that I've created myself after examining lots of different sources. Will find out what it's like in a week or so when I have a first try but am expecting to leave it lagering in the keg in my shed until the weather warms up a little before it's going to be at it's best.
Next one I'm doing is a hoppy number, probably West Coast IPA, still deciding whether to make it up or base it on a tried and trusted recipe.
 
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I found a website a while back that listed dozens, if not hundreds of commercial beer clone recipes. After seeing this thread, I have been searching for it again and have just found it. It is a New Zealand hop grower's site, but has an interesting selection of recipes.

Hop Plants for Sale in New Zealand

You will have to adjust the malt varieties, as they are all quoted in a local maltsters selection, but that shouldn't be too hard.
You found the holy grail ,,, top marks sir !
 

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