How fast can I knock out a stout with kviek?

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by MyQul, Dec 12, 2019.

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  1. Dec 12, 2019 #1

    MyQul

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    I seem to be on a a bit of a stout thing at the moment. But they take longer to brew than my usual pale ales/bitters. So I was thinking of using kveik. I understand I could ferment a typical stout of around 1.050 OG in under a week. Is this correct?

    Do stouts condition faster using kviek, as this is the main issue I have with stouts? I usually try and wait 1 month before tucking in. I dont really mind the two week fermentation time (although the well known fast fermentation times of kveik would help), its the contioning time thats the real killer.

    Also which kviek would formites recommend (ideally an easy to get hold of one)?
     
  2. Dec 12, 2019 #2

    Linalmeemow

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    Last dry stout I did used S04 and was very drinkable after 3 weeks (2 in the FV, 1 carbing and conditioning in the bottle). It improved with age but it was very good after 3.
     
  3. Dec 12, 2019 #3

    MyQul

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    My pales/bitters are usually have this schedule. I have a dry stout in the FV at the mo which is due for packaging next week. I'll try it after one week in the bottle
     
  4. Dec 12, 2019 #4

    Ghillie

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    I understand the appeal of quicker fermenting, but overall it’s not worth it IMO.

    Firstly the flavour of Kviek is awful, I’ve used Voss twice and it was disgusting.

    US05 as an example will ferment out fully in 8 days, I let mine ride for two weeks but that’s just me. Then a week cold crash and into the keg. Similar to yourself, I would age a dark beer for a month minimum before getting set about it.

    So with Kviek you shave a fractional amount of time off fermentation realistically speaking, then once you’ve considered the detrimental flavour impact and the fact that you’re clearing and aging will take over one month anyhow, I’d be inclined to go the extra 8-10 days with a nice tasting yeast.

    If I didn’t care for clarity, flavour or clean beer then I’d use Kviek. Turn a beer around in 4 days with burst carbing.
     
  5. Dec 12, 2019 #5

    Cwrw666

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    I've always found stout to be perfectly drinkable after a weeks carbing up. Sure it gets even better a few weeks later but it's nice to experience the change.
     
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  6. Dec 12, 2019 #6

    MyQul

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    I haven't made a dry stout in years (apart from a mini mash porter that tasted more like a stout, and that took months to come good) so tbh, have forgotten how soon I can start to drink it. By the sound of it, a stout will be ready in the same brewing time as my pale/bitters athumb..
     
  7. Dec 12, 2019 #7

    MyQul

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    I've only used kveik once and dont remember any horrible flavour. Tbh Im leaning towards dry yeast nowadays after some really nice beers made with MJ Liberty Bell and CML California Common. I only thought of kviek as I thought it'd help me out, but it sounds like there would only be some marginal benefits for me at best
     
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  8. Dec 12, 2019 #8

    Gulpitdarn

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    I started a Chocolate stout on the 19th November... it has nearly all gone! been drinking it for about a week and a half. I've got to say it is one of the best beers I've yet made.

    1.500g Light Dry Malt Extract
    250g Chocolate Malt - cold steeped in fridge over night.
    250g Dark Crystal Malt - 70*C steeped
    200g Lactose
    150g Malto-dextrine
    200g Cocoa Powder
    30g 15g + 15g East Kent Goldings Hops
    Kviek Gjerness Voss.
     
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  9. Dec 12, 2019 #9

    St00

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    Was it a commercial or farm strain Ghillie?
     
  10. Dec 12, 2019 #10

    Ghillie

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    Voss from MM. Would be lying if I knew whether it was farmhouse or commercial...

    I was kindly given it by another forum member. I brewed a pseudo lager with it and sadly it was anything but neutral in flavour. Massive lactic like zing to it. The gent who gave me it had a similar experience.
     
  11. Dec 12, 2019 #11

    Ghillie

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    It may be better suited for dark malt forward and/or hoppy beers.

    I brewed a lager with it and as you know, there’s nowhere to hide with that...
     
  12. Dec 12, 2019 #12

    BeerCat

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    Definitely under a week if you can ferment warm. Even if i say so myself i have made some amazing hoppy and dark beers with kveik. Its really hard to screw up.
    To be honest though i have switched to wyeast 1084, keg after 10 days and start drinking straight away. Kveik is great for dark beers but i just fancied a change. I believe the fact that i don't boil the wort also speeds up conditioning time where a stout is concerned.
    I would suggest if you want the beer to carb up fast add some fresh yeast when you bottle.

    Edit. I would start with Voss.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019
  13. Dec 12, 2019 #13

    St00

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    Hi Ghillie,

    It was a single isolated strain then. I was going to comment that if it's a farm kveik they're multi-strain, so I can understand why there's a random element. I usually only hear good things about Kveik especially for pseudo lagers. Sounds like you were unfortunate.
     
  14. Dec 17, 2019 #14

    Zephyr259

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    Voss is good in dark beers in my experience, as is Saure / Tormodgarden. I came across something recently which picked up on folks saying kveiks can be neutral flavoured as they're generally not but they are "clean" in the sense they don't create fusels or phenols. Holds true in my experience as I find my Voss has a very strong characteristic earthy flavour which does mellow over time and works well in dark or malty beers.

    Both the above will ferment out in 2 - 3 days and carbonate within a week, other the sample at bottling (after it's been crashed to 3c) tastes good and not very green, samples at 30 - 40c always taste odd.

    Good luck.
     
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