How long does mead take to brew ?

Discussion in 'Coffee, Kombucha & Mead Forum' started by cheshirehomebrew, Jun 26, 2018.

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  1. Jun 26, 2018 #1

    cheshirehomebrew

    cheshirehomebrew

    cheshirehomebrew

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    Hi all I was thinking about making some mead up and it looks fairly straightforward, the thing is I am getting different info when I look into the brewing bottling drinking cycle.

    As I usually brew IPA's I am used to a 6-8 week brewing bottling drinking cycle, however I have read info where its laid down for months on end.

    Is this how long it takes or simply some myth that's come down to us from the Vikings when they brought their food and culture here.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Jun 26, 2018 #2

    rank_frank

    rank_frank

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    I've made mead a couple of times and it tastes like drain cleaner at first. My experience is that it takes at least 4 months to be palatable and improves with further aging. At 8 months it's really quite good.
     
  3. Jun 26, 2018 #3

    Sadfield

    Sadfield

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    I heard a good rule of thumb for mead is; 6 months, plus an extra month for every 1% ABV. So a 9% mead should need 15 months.

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  4. Jun 26, 2018 #4

    IainM

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    First mead I did fermented out, and was horrible after fermentation. I put it aside for 10 months and it became very nice indeed, and had similar experiences with a cyser and a blackcurrant melomel. This is about the time-scale of a 13-14% abv mead. My latest mead I put on at the beginning of January, but this time much higher gravity. Fermentation slowed after a couple of months, but it is still going now with a glug every 15-30 mins or so. I'll bottle it at the end of the summer then probably leave it another year or so before trying it. Good mead, and indeed country wines, are long-term investments and not for the impatient, but stick it out and future you will thank present you.
     
  5. Jun 26, 2018 #5

    GerritT

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  6. Jun 27, 2018 #6

    cheshirehomebrew

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    Blimey, thanks everyone, I may pop back for further guidance before I make a couple of gallons up and lay it down for next spring then.
     
  7. Jul 2, 2018 #7

    Zephyr259

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    There's also the BOMM which is mead in a month using Wyeast 1388 Belgian Strong Ale. Staggers the nutrient additions and de-gasses often but gives a good mead in a month which presumably improves with some more aging. But got around to trying it but after finding a local-ish meadery at the Aberdeen market on Saturday I'm keen to make my own again.
     
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  8. Jul 17, 2018 at 2:55 PM #8

    AdeDunn

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    If you want a mead you can drink faster, make a metheglin (spiced mead) with something like vanilla, stopping it early so it's still quite sweet and less alcoholic. I did this last year with a batch of vanilla metheglin and it was quite nice pretty much from the off (took it from an OG of 1.090 down to 1.004). The spices help to cover the flaws present in such a young mead. It still tastes better given time to mature though. A straight up mead though, with no spices or anything to cover flaws, needs as long as you can give it to taste good. The longer you can give it the better it tastes. The higher the ABV, the longer it needs.

    Hydromel can be fun to make too. It's kinda mead ale, so super simple to make. Last batch I made I didn't even mess around with citric acid, tanins etc. Just honey and water to an OG of about 1.045, then an ale yeast to ferment it. Once it's done, prime it with honey (use a priming calculator as you would for beer) and bottle, give it a few months to carbonate and condition. Give it a chill, serve it at a barbecue and have a something different to drink and discuss. You can play with spices, herbs, fruit etc just like you can with meads, but I kept my first attempt simple. More recently I made a braggot, but that's a whole different kettle of fish, and was a whole other level of complexity, what with mashing grain, boiling wort with hops etc.... lol
     

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