I it generally cheaper

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Binkei Huckaback

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Supermarket beer is **** and repetitive

Is it? It depends what the OP means by 'supermarket beer'. I wouldn't say London Pride or Franziskaner or many of the other beers on supermarket shelves are **** and I doubt many others would. As for repetitive, well, you could say that about anything.

As for the OP's question, purely in terms of ingredients and eventually kit, yes it is cheaper than buying beer from a supermarket as you're not paying duty, but once you factor in your time (even at mininum wage) if you're only making 25 litres at a time, probably not.
 
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once you factor in your time (even at mininum wage) if you're only making 25 litres at a time, probably not.
Hi Binkei,
You make a reasonable point if we were only talking about a paid-employment business situation.
But we're talking about a hobby here - it's illegal to sell home-brew, after all.
So no, hobbyists do not need to factor-in minimum wage costs.
So it would appear home brew is cheaper, and more fun through the direct involvement in the process.
On a different tack:
Also let's call a spade a spade here, it is a consideration that for many less financially well off hobbyists, that the simple cost of the beer they would like to consume would be prohibitive i.e. they cannot afford the money that is required to be paid to the H. M. R. C. (syphoned off to the Exchequer).
This applies to the U. K. of course, it may not apply in other countries where duty is far less - Any comment from non-Brits here?
Over there, it could just be a hobby, no cost considerations involved there.
All the best of fun in brewing,
Robin.
 

Binkei Huckaback

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Hi Binkei,
You make a reasonable point if we were only talking about a paid-employment business situation.
But we're talking about a hobby here - it's illegal to sell home-brew, after all.
So no, hobbyists do not need to factor-in minimum wage costs.
So it would appear home brew is cheaper, and more fun through the direct involvement in the process.
On a different tack:
Also let's call a spade a spade here, it is a consideration that for many less financially well off hobbyists, that the simple cost of the beer they would like to consume would be prohibitive i.e. they cannot afford the money that is required to be paid to the H. M. R. C. (syphoned off to the Exchequer).
This applies to the U. K. of course, it may not apply in other countries where duty is far less - Any comment from non-Brits here?
Over there, it could just be a hobby, no cost considerations involved there.
All the best of fun in brewing,
Robin.

I'm not suggesting brewing isn't fun. The majority of us wouldn't do it if that was the case. I only answered the OP's question.

How can the Exchequor be 'siphoning' money from HMRC? HMRC exists to collect revenue for the Exchequor.
 

roboto

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If you're making basic bitter then maybe it's not worth it, but if you enjoy brewing and make expensive hoppy beers then it's more than cost effective, just so long as you don't go buying a 3 vessel system off the bat...
 
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How can the Exchequor be 'siphoning' money from HMRC? HMRC exists to collect revenue for the Exchequor.
Sorry, a pour attempt at a brewing-related pun. (another one there).
And w.r.t. costings when assessing "is it generally cheaper", the minimum wage consideration I thought was irrelevant as it is is not a cost, so should not be considered when totting up the costings when it is a hobby.
Regards,
Robin.
 
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You can make beer at lower cost than you can buy it - but you won’t.

The reason is that you will be bitten by the bug of making ever better and more varied beer and will invest more and more in equipment, ingredients, and even the environment/facilities where you brew, condition, and serve your beer. Jump on board and enjoy the ride... 😉
 
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Is it? It depends what the OP means by 'supermarket beer'. I wouldn't say London Pride or Franziskaner or many of the other beers on supermarket shelves are **** and I doubt many others would. As for repetitive, well, you could say that about anything.

As for the OP's question, purely in terms of ingredients and eventually kit, yes it is cheaper than buying beer from a supermarket as you're not paying duty, but once you factor in your time (even at mininum wage) if you're only making 25 litres at a time, probably not.

I think they are. Same beers in the same supermarkets up and down the country. I also noticed a trend. Last summer a lot of beer space was taken over by fruit ciders. For the last few months the non alcoholic beers have been pushing the proper beers out of space.

The latest 'launching Tesco as been very poor. Rehashing the same **** b7t changing the can size.
 

Random Badger

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I would say £1.50 per pint/500ml is a reasonable benchmark for supermarket prices, as you can usually find something acceptable on a 4 for £6 offer these days. Bland lager and cooking bitter will be available for less and craft can cost a fair bit more.
 

ppsmith

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The best analogy I've heard (forget where, might even be on here somewhere) is that home brewing to make cheap beer is the same as buying a boat to get cheap fish.

Personally, I try to keep the costs down to a reasonable level by making as much of my own equipment as possible, and it scratches my itch of needing to create something tangible - I'm a computer programmer by profession so everything I create is digital, just moving electrons into slightly different places. Nice to make something I can hold in my hands... then drink :D
 

Chippy_Tea

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I don't brew beer so cannot compare supermarket beers to home brew but i disagree with this statement there are some really good ones out there and many are mentioned in this thread -

I guess I am more of a neipa, craft man and like variety. Supermarkets doesn't provide what I want
 

Chippy_Tea

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I guess I am more of a neipa, craft man and like variety. Supermarkets doesn't provide what I want

I guess when you can make whatever you like and its probably in most cases better beer there isn't much point in buying stuff from the shops.
 
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I guess when you can make whatever you like and its probably in most cases better beer there isn't much point in buying stuff from the shops.
Haven't bought a supermarket beer for well over 6 months. Went to my local bottle shop yesterday. Got a few that I wouldn't make and a few to try so I can compare against mine. Also bought to support the shop/bar.
 

damienair

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Before I started making home brew beer back in December I used to buy a box of 20 x 330ml bottles of Heineken, Miller or Canadian for between 15-20 Euros. I’ve only made a few brews so far and I am drinking my way through the last of my second brew. Since tasting my first and second brews I have been very impressed. I have not had a Heineken or Miller since.
At the moment I am treating myself to a few Craft beers every Friday evening. I buy 5 or 6 beers in 500ml bottles so as to try out different styles and as an added bonus I get a few 500 ml bottles afterwards. These beers cost between €2.50 to €3.00.
The Coopers Hefe Wheat Kit when done was as good as any shop bought craft wheat beer and cost was probably around €0.80 per 500ml bottle. So definitely cheaper than craft beers. And a little cheaper than Heineken or Canadian. But it tastes way better. I’m not doing this to save money, I’m doing this to brew my own beer, and enjoy a few of my own. So far so good.
 
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roboto

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Haven't bought a supermarket beer for well over 6 months. Went to my local bottle shop yesterday. Got a few that I wouldn't make and a few to try so I can compare against mine. Also bought to support the shop/bar.

I've made a vague rule for myself this year that I won't purchase any beers for personal consumption from the supermarket. The only commercial beers I've had so far have been a few Hazy Jane's I had left over from Christmas. I'm willing to concede that I won't make it through the year with a clean sheet, but I think for drinking at home I should be able to be self sufficient!

Fair play to support your local, it's hard to know if your beer is any good if you can't compare it to the professional stuff!
 
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My wife bought me a youngs lager kit set up with one bucket etc. I left it for a year and then started to make it and once I was drinking it I thought soon I can go back to my normal Kronneberg or whatever - all I have to do is get through this 40 pints. I then got to a beer that had been bottled for 3 weeks and realised that it was really good (having been matured for a bit - I knew nothing at this point). Today I did my 242nd brew and about 150 of these have been all grain. Is it cheaper - yes for great quality real beers - I work in London and for beer with less taste, body and quality I will have to pay £5. For £23 I can buy 25kg of Grain, enough for 250 pints at least - although as others have said the hops, yeast and additions can add up. But at 40p a pint of beer that I love it is really really worth it and by now all my equipment has been used for 150 brews so about 6000 pints so basically its been free for a long time! I love the fact that I can make any style and strength that I think of and be drinking it in a few months ( for the most complex ones). I love this hobby and think about BEER all day long :-)
 
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You can make beer at lower cost than you can buy it - but you won’t.

The reason is that you will be bitten by the bug of making ever better and more varied beer and will invest more and more in equipment, ingredients, and even the environment/facilities where you brew, condition, and serve your beer. Jump on board and enjoy the ride... 😉
WAHOO!!!
As the guy, jumping out of the tyre-smoking-Ferrari said to St. Peter at the gates of Heaven,
"What a ride! ".
(p. s. "guy" is non-gender specific in this modern world, according to my beer loving daughter)
 
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TonyT

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Supermarket beer is **** and repetitive
I don’t agree with that entirely. A lot of it is, admittedly only good for putting out fires but there are nevertheless some nice ones. I’ve recently had a Badger Cranbourne Poacher, Robinsons Old Tom and Harbwr Brewing Nossa Signora stout all of which Mrs T acquired in Sainsbury‘s andallofwhich I would buy again.
 

bobukbrewer

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Waitrose sell Dark Star APA and Revelation - two superb beers. Agree most supermarket beers are very average. Most of my home brews are better than most supermarket beers. Plus it is an enjoyable hobby. Cost is not important to me.
 
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