JaDeD Immersion Chillers in the UK

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Ossiary

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Hi, Been thinking about investing in one but never actually seen a UK based supplier. Final option would be to buy one direct and pay for shipping/duty etc. But, if I was going down that route I'd be interested to know if anyone else would like to combine orders to save on shipping. A Hydra is $160 and currently shipping ONLY on a single Hydra is $117, two are $127 and three are $155, four $184...you see what I mean...
from $117 per item to about $46 is quite a saving.

So:

1) Does anyone know if anywhere in the UK sells JaDeD Chillers? (preferred option!)
2) If not, would anyone else consider combining orders for some of their produce? Totally non-binding at this point, just getting an idea of whether there would likely be any takers.
If so, there are a lot of moving parts to consider, including the Import Duty etc. and also onward shipping in the UK. I'd expect a Hydra (Copper) to come in at around £200 - 220 (Pounds, not Dollars) not including UK side shipping but including Duty and USA - UK shipping. Of course, if the charges were less we'd all pay less.

Import Duty Calculator shows the total to be closer to £190, but there are always charges by the courier for gathering the Taxes too. Import Commodity Code 8438400000 was used in this calculation.

Ideally I'd prefer to avoid the pain of ordering Internationally, but saving £50 on shipping is a bit of a compelling argument if no local suppliers are available. What do you think?

Also interested to hear if there are any domestic Immersion Cooler alternatives which show the same sort of cooling/water use? Would rather avoid Plate Chillers and Counterflow Coolers for ease of use and cleaning, I also don't have a pump.

Thanks all!
 

Ossiary

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Thanks for your reply. I already have an immersion chiller, but the efficiency of this one is quite impressive. I’m ok at simple projects, but making a 3 x 25’ parallel coil with no leaks, not so much.
 

Hanglow

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Fair enough, I know dicking about with equipment is not for everyone.

I ditched my copper coil for stainless as I wanted to remove all copper from my brewing due to oxidation issues, decided to take the increased time to chill instead as a compromise.
 

Ossiary

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As a relative newbie to this whole thing, is oxidation at this side of the process really a thing? I have heard there’s a strong debate around Hot Side Aeration but really haven’t seen enough evidence to make an informed choice. What is the difference between oxidation then vs the intentional addition of oxygen before pitching Yeast?
 
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Ossiary

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And I also seem to have taken my own thread off topic. I’m sure there are already many threads dealing with this and those are probably the best place for that discussion. Apologies!
 

Hanglow

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Most threads go for a wonder :laugh8:

HSA is most certainly real.

Whether or not you want to combat it is up to you, plenty of great beers are made with lots of HSA. My beers have improved a lot since trying to remove HSA, but if there are any post fermentation (cold side) oxidation problems then no matter how anal you are about removing HSA your beer is going to suffer. So it's always best to concentrate on removing cold side oxidation first.

What made me try removing HSA from my brewing was trying a mini mash experiment, just tasting and seeing the difference between an oxidised wort and nonoxidised was enough to convince me to delve a bit deeper into it.

This is the best site regarding it, you can still read the older blog entries,

Anyway, sorry for derailing your thread, hope you find a solution!
 

Ossiary

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Thanks for the info, Hanglow. Always interested to read thoughts from new sources.

I think I need to take the blame for hijacking my own thread though!
 

Braufather

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I have a regular immersion chiller and it pains me how much water is wasted and how long it takes especially in summer.

What are the efficiencies gained with this version?

In terms of hot side oxygen. Given that the Braumeister system for example Is designed to include a fair bit of splashing without any issues I’m not sure how much of an issue it actually is.
 

Ossiary

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Thanks for that, TETB. The Coolossus CFC from The Malt Miller was another contender, but the info which I have been able to find online regarding this suggests that this particular design of IC (JaDeD) alows a substantially faster cooling process than CFC, and also easier cleaning thereafter. I'm also quite keen on the idea that the whole batch of wort is chilled quickly rather than a small portion at a time. I've heard a little about the potential for additional Diacetyl evolution during a smaller volume chill or cooling over a longer time period. Again, very early days in my research and keen hear other's opinions.
It is one of the things I really like about the Home Brewing community, we all have our own preferred processes and it's a bit of a kid in a sweetshop feeling being at the thin end of the equipment owning wedge! So many choices...
 

Braufather

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Seems to stand up. Also seems geterbrewed might do something similar. I’m off to check!
 

cheeseyfeet

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I have a Chillinator - to be honest I'm not that impressed with it.

I have pretty cold groundwater and it still takes a good 30 mins to chill to pitching temperatures, that's with the pump whirlpooling.

I built my own CFC from plumbing supplies and use this now - it can take boiling in one end and push out 16c the other with a slow flow, takes 15/20 mins to get to the fermenter but I'm happy.
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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Thanks for that, TETB. The Coolossus CFC from The Malt Miller was another contender, but the info which I have been able to find online regarding this suggests that this particular design of IC (JaDeD) alows a substantially faster cooling process than CFC, and also easier cleaning thereafter. I'm also quite keen on the idea that the whole batch of wort is chilled quickly rather than a small portion at a time. I've heard a little about the potential for additional Diacetyl evolution during a smaller volume chill or cooling over a longer time period. Again, very early days in my research and keen hear other's opinions.
It is one of the things I really like about the Home Brewing community, we all have our own preferred processes and it's a bit of a kid in a sweetshop feeling being at the thin end of the equipment owning wedge! So many choices...
Nicely put :hat:- and I totally agree about the diversity in the community for us each having our own preferred processes that we know and love :-)

If I understand correctly, it seems to me that the key feature of this particular immersion chiller in question is that it is very long (I've seen 23m quoted in one of the links). So for them to claim it's substantial faster than a counterflow, they'd have to be comparing it to one about the same length - which would be a bit of a beast (!) but it would work very very fast.

Forgive me for getting geeky for a minute - this isn't because I'm trying to show off or say I'm right (!!) it's just to add a bit of context athumb.. athumb.. athumb..

There are two reasons a counterflow chiller is interesting:

The first is that the whole volume of the hot wort comes into contact with the cooled surface of the pipe walls for the same period of time, because it all flows through the tube. In contrast an immersion has to be agitated quite vigorously during use, otherwise different parts of the wort spend different periods of time in contact with the chiller pipe.​
The second is that the counterflow is extremely thermodynamically efficient at how it utilises the temperature difference between the hot wort and the cold tapwater in order to transfer heat energy out of the wort. This is because the fluids are going in opposite directions (the 'counter' flow thing) which means that the temperature difference is maximised at the end of the process, so that the wort just emerging from the end of the device benefits from the maximum 'cooling effect' of the fresh water going in (see here for more details: Why counter flow heat exchangers are more efficient).​
 
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The-Engineer-That-Brews

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I have a Chillinator - to be honest I'm not that impressed with it.

I have pretty cold groundwater and it still takes a good 30 mins to chill to pitching temperatures, that's with the pump whirlpooling.

I built my own CFC from plumbing supplies and use this now - it can take boiling in one end and push out 16c the other with a slow flow, takes 15/20 mins to get to the fermenter but I'm happy.
Yep that's consistent with what I get with my CFC (8mm tube x 10m long). My immersion chiller was probably even slower than yours, but it was only about half the length of the Chillinator.
 
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