Joining two gas manifolds...

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by nhenson22, Aug 15, 2019.

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  1. Aug 15, 2019 #1

    nhenson22

    nhenson22

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  2. Aug 15, 2019 #2

    Jakeyboi

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    Go to a plumbers merchant and buy a 1/4” brass compression coupling. Then remove the nut and olive from either end and it will act as a threaded male coupler to join your two manifolds together.

     
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  3. Aug 15, 2019 #3

    Jakeyboi

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    Oh and a roll of PTFE tape to stop it leaking
     
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  4. Aug 16, 2019 #4

    BarnBrian

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    I don’t follow how you’re trying to join the manifolds, or why you need a left hand thread coupler.
    If you’re using 3/8” gas line from your regulator then put a John Guest “T” piece in lin to supply both manifolds.
     
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  5. Aug 16, 2019 #5

    nhenson22

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  6. Aug 16, 2019 #6

    nhenson22

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    To be honest, I have no idea what I need, or if it has to be LHT. That was just the part suggested to a similar question on a US forum.

    The reason I want to try and join is I am upgrading the kegerator to a keezer and want to add a couple more gas lines on while keeping everything tidy.
    You could argue I could jut bite the bullet and shell out for a bigger manifold!
     
  7. Aug 16, 2019 #7

    Ghillie

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    Not entirely neccessary. As mentioned, the JG Y splitter works well. I have 5 kegs in my keezer but only three outputs from my regs. So I use 2 JG Y splitters. 2 + 2 + 1 = 5.

    I soon came to realise that I like most of the beers I drink at the same level of carbonation. So one reg per keg is unnecessary for my needs. Them JG fittings are about ten times cheaper than a scondary reg which I'd ultimately leave at the same pressure all the time...

    In fact when I get home I'm removing my secondary regs and selling them to a nice chap on here; will replace them with a basic 3 way manifold and carb everything the same.

    Screenshot 2019-08-16 at 19.26.44.png
     
  8. Aug 16, 2019 #8

    Jakeyboi

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  9. Aug 17, 2019 #9

    peebee

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    I had a quick look for an actual replacement (rather than the "easy" route using JG fittings) and what I found:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NPT-Male...hash=item19e3983e7e:m:mQzFWIhrt6BzWm-RgJU4Ysw

    But this was making an important assumption that you've made a typo in the OP and I think some others have been making the assumption without realising:

    Why do you think you need left-hand threads? That would be pretty unusual.


    The "1-1/2-inch" bit I assume is the length of the nipple and probably immaterial. The important bit was that it is a 1/4" NPT; are sure you mean 1/4", an old manifold I've got (commonly supplied to home-brewing) I'm sure is 3/8"? The eBay link has "Context Pneumatics" down as the supplier, my preferred supplier for pneumatic bits-and-bobs, but getting one offs via eBay is cheaper on the P&P. And Context Pneumatics are cheap; cheaper than JG, and for resilient metal connectors too.

    Warning: 1/4" NPT isn't compatible with the equivalent British-used 1/4" pipe thread (you don't see "BSP" much any longer). You can get away with mixing 1/2" threads, but not 1/4".


    I'm probably making the JG "easy" route more enticing!
     
  10. Aug 17, 2019 #10

    peebee

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    Sorry - just noticed my last post contains what might be felt as a "scare story":

    The "BSP" thread hasn't gone anywhere (phew)! But as of quite recently it is often not referred to as "BSP". I think because other countries didn't like referring to their standard pipe thread as "British"? (BSP = "British Standard Pipe"). Can't for the life of me remember what the thread frequently gets called now? Anyone else … ?


    EDIT: Ah, it was the Germans! 1" BSP is the same as "DIN 25" and so forth. Often come across this now because China seemed to have adopted it.

    I'm sure I came across another designation recently too? It had two letters?

    (E.g. https://www.harveywatersofteners.co.uk/blog/plumbers-pipes-and-german-vs-english-standards).


    EDIT2: Once I've got the bit 'tween 'teeth there's no stopping me! I think the "two letter designation" comes from mucking about with tapered threads. Which is not really in the discussion here (except NPT is a tapered thread and "PT" was the designation I might of been thinking about).

    (E.g. https://www.yamawa.com/Portals/0/resource/en/tips/pdf/tips-056.pdf).


    EDIT3: In case anyone (like me!) bookmarks this information: I'm a bit suspicious of that last link (Yamawa) because it talks as if "R" and "PT" tapered threads are the same. But "R" is based on the British Whitworth standard (like BSPT) and "PT" on US JIS standards (like NPT) which are not quite the same. Confused? Then do try to ignore that "R" is derived from German!
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  11. Aug 17, 2019 #11

    peebee

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    All that previous waffle leads to:
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5PCS-1-4-PT-x-1-4-PT-M-M-Thread-Straight-Air-Hose-Quick-Joints-Hex-Nipple/362589899203?_trkparms=aid=111001&algo=REC.SEED&ao=1&asc=20180105095853&meid=d3108c02a91c4998a2e0440e686dcf5f&pid=100903&rk=1&rkt=20&mehot=lo&sd=362589899203&itm=362589899203&pg=2509164&_trksid=p2509164.c100903.m5276
    You need a tenacious lunatic on the job to figure how they might work! And maybe you want one, not five.

    I'm still worried that you want 3/8" not 1/4". But I'm probably wrong.

    EDIT: 1/4" thread will be roughly 13-14mm diameter, 3/8" 17mm. Not intuitive 'cos these sizes are based on pipe bore not the pipe outer diameter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  12. Aug 19, 2019 at 3:40 PM #12

    peebee

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    Good grief, this tenacious lunatic may have come unstuck! PT, or JIS tapered pipe threads, are the same as BSPT (so 1/4" PT has 19 TPI pitch like BSP(T), whereas 1/4" NPT has 18 TPI pitch). What a minefield, and seems I trod on one!

    But true to my "tenacious lunatic" description I kept looking 'cos I don't like little doubts niggling at me (I've Yamawa to thank for that particular niggle). See https://trimantec.com/blogs/t/thread-identification-guide and make up your own mind.
     
  13. Aug 20, 2019 at 2:42 PM #13

    nhenson22

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    Haha, you can't help yourself once you get going can you!
    Thanks for all the info, you may or may not have confused me further!

    However, I think I am clear that it is RHT and not LHT.
    Size wise, I will wait until I move the manifold across to the keezer (as it's currently fixed at back of kegerator) and measure, then if one of the fittings you have suggested works, I can go ahead and add on another manifold!

    Thanks

    P.s For simplicity, also like the JG Y splitter suggestion. May go down this route as I normally have at least 2 beers that will be roughly same PSI.
     
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  14. Aug 20, 2019 at 5:31 PM #14

    peebee

    peebee

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    It confuses the hell out of me, so why shouldn't it confuse everyone else I describe it to!

    I gain too. I was convinced JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) was based on American standards, but I get to purge that out me head - it's based on British standards.
     

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