Just acquired more allotment space, which hops to grow along side my Chinook and Centennial?

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DDHIPA

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I currently have 2 x Chinook and 3 x Centennial in the ground and have just acquired space for probably another 5 plants.
At the moment I tend to be brewing mostly Hazy IPA's and West Coast IPA's (shocker right?!). With the bombastic US/Aus/NZ varieties out of the question due to difficulties getting hold of them (unless someone knows something I don't?) I was thinking of Nugget & Cascade?

Curious to hear any other suggestions? I could always plant more chinook and Centennial to increase my yield but variety is the spice of life after all
 

foxy

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If you are growing different varieties then you will have to keep in mind they are rhizomes, they travel horizontally. You will have to plant them at least 2 meters apart, otherwise you won't know what you are picking.
065.JPG

Keep the varieties in different rows.
 

Darren Jeory

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If you are growing different varieties then you will have to keep in mind they are rhizomes, they travel horizontally. You will have to plant them at least 2 meters apart, otherwise you won't know what you are picking.
View attachment 42237
Keep the varieties in different rows.
I bet it smells amaaaaaazing there!?
 

DDHIPA

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If you are growing different varieties then you will have to keep in mind they are rhizomes, they travel horizontally. You will have to plant them at least 2 meters apart, otherwise you won't know what you are picking.
View attachment 42237
Keep the varieties in different rows.
Looks fab! Unfortunately due to space/layout constraints I am unable to group varieties in rows like this.

this is how my 5 plants are currentlygrowing:
2E6B9BBE-A9A0-4B30-9007-4FC00B09A4A0.jpeg

When you say they grow horizontally are you talking about the rhizome structure underground? I didn’t think this would matter so much as I will always be training new shoots from the same part of growth?

or do you mean once the plant has reached the top vertically it will continue to grow horizontally and then intertwine with adjacent plants making it difficult to harvest separately?
 

foxy

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Looks fab! Unfortunately due to space/layout constraints I am unable to group varieties in rows like this.

this is how my 5 plants are currentlygrowing:
View attachment 42246
When you say they grow horizontally are you talking about the rhizome structure underground? I didn’t think this would matter so much as I will always be training new shoots from the same part of growth?

or do you mean once the plant has reached the top vertically it will continue to grow horizontally and then intertwine with adjacent plants making it difficult to harvest separately?
Horizontal / lateral movement of the root, they move searching for a host which it can climb up. Having a different variety hop close by means you could have 2 varieties climbing the same support. I had one which came up about three meters away and started climbing a plum tree.
 

DDHIPA

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Horizontal / lateral movement of the root, they move searching for a host which it can climb up. Having a different variety hop close by means you could have 2 varieties climbing the same support. I had one which came up about three meters away and started climbing a plum tree.
Yikes, I knew they were rampant but didn’t quite realise to this extent.....

I just won’t tell my wife
 

Hanglow

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A single hop plant could easily take over that entire bed in a few years. Not a problem if you are only growing one variety or don't care if when you harvest you get a mix.

You can constrain them somewhat by knocking out the base of a very large pot and growing each plant in that, the roots will be able to get more water from the ground then
 
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MagnusTS

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Looks fab! Unfortunately due to space/layout constraints I am unable to group varieties in rows like this.

this is how my 5 plants are currentlygrowing:
View attachment 42246
When you say they grow horizontally are you talking about the rhizome structure underground? I didn’t think this would matter so much as I will always be training new shoots from the same part of growth?

or do you mean once the plant has reached the top vertically it will continue to grow horizontally and then intertwine with adjacent plants making it difficult to harvest separately?
I like your hop bed, looks really smart, and using the allotment fence to support your frame - good thinking.

I grow First Gold/Prima Donna on my allotment. I know it's probably not right for your west coast IPAs, but I like it for hoppy English bitters, it has a lovely spicy marmalade taste. And it loves the English climate. I had some cascade, but found the flavour I was getting from the hops was not the same as shop bought. I don't think it enjoyed the lovely Leeds climate.

I just have my First Gold by the side of the shed, and it grows up and covers the shed every summer. It's a dwarf variety, but is massive. There are more hops than I can be bothered to pick and dry. I can't imagine how much growth an established standard hop variety would put on every year.
 

Darren Jeory

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What is a good aromatic hop that will grow over here in the UK?
 

DDHIPA

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A single hop plant could easily take over that entire bed in a few years. Not a problem if you are only growing one variety or don't care if when you harvest you get a mix.

You can constrain them somewhat by knocking out the base of a very large pot and growing each plant in that, the roots will be able to get more water from the ground then
I'm seriously considering buying a bed divider 1m+ between varieties, I know the roots will eventually find a way around but it may help.....
 

DDHIPA

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I like your hop bed, looks really smart, and using the allotment fence to support your frame - good thinking.

I grow First Gold/Prima Donna on my allotment. I know it's probably not right for your west coast IPAs, but I like it for hoppy English bitters, it has a lovely spicy marmalade taste. And it loves the English climate. I had some cascade, but found the flavour I was getting from the hops was not the same as shop bought. I don't think it enjoyed the lovely Leeds climate.

I just have my First Gold by the side of the shed, and it grows up and covers the shed every summer. It's a dwarf variety, but is massive. There are more hops than I can be bothered to pick and dry. I can't imagine how much growth an established standard hop variety would put on every year.
I thought about English varieties but being in the South East I am surrounded by hop fields and at harvest I know of a farmer who sells bines for £10 each, I was thinking of doing a wet hop beer in September and also doing a trial run drying them rather than ruining my own crop first try
 

MagnusTS

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I thought about English varieties but being in the South East I am surrounded by hop fields and at harvest I know of a farmer who sells bines for £10 each, I was thinking of doing a wet hop beer in September and also doing a trial run drying them rather than ruining my own crop first try
Sounds like a good plan.
I think your hops will enjoy your climate in the south east better than up here in Leeds.
 

AXW123

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I grow cascade and centennial. Went out yesterday and they were already sprouting the first bines!
 

DDHIPA

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I grow cascade and centennial. Went out yesterday and they were already sprouting the first bines!
That’s exciting! I’m looking forward to mine getting going
 

AXW123

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Post pictures- I love to see how different hops grow in different parts of the country. I am probably one of the most south hop grower on the forum I wonder who is the most north?
 

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