Krausen

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mancer62

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I just bottled and kegged 2 batches of IPA which still had a very active looking Krausen in my FV.
In past experience the Krausen usually all but disappears but this time it hadn't.
I was using a 10g pack of dry yeast (Clipper) specifically suited to IPA's.
I brewed late on the 12th of May and dry hopped on the 18th.
My OG was 1044 and yesterday when I kegged and bottled my FG was1004 (which it had been for a few days).
Was I correct to have gone ahead and bottled/kegged at this stage or should I have waited till the Krausen had gone down?
look forward to replies.
 

Dutto

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Brewed 12/5 ended on 25/5. OG 1.044 and FG 1.004 and steady.

Looks okay to me …

… but, I would open bottles at 3 and 7 days; just in case bottling & kegging the brew was an error.
:hat:
 
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I just bottled and kegged 2 batches of IPA which still had a very active looking Krausen in my FV.
In past experience the Krausen usually all but disappears but this time it hadn't.
I was using a 10g pack of dry yeast (Clipper) specifically suited to IPA's.
I brewed late on the 12th of May and dry hopped on the 18th.
My OG was 1044 and yesterday when I kegged and bottled my FG was1004 (which it had been for a few days).
Was I correct to have gone ahead and bottled/kegged at this stage or should I have waited till the Krausen had gone down?
look forward to replies.

Not sure if this helps at all but I've just put my ipa in the fridge to cold crash, also clipper and 14 days in the fv. Still got a thick krausen but no airlock activity. Didn't check fg because I kind of feel if it's not ready by now it'll have something wrong with it. 🤣
 
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We all seem to use Krausen for the stuff on the top of the fermenter.

Why?

Its always struck me as a horrible, strange word. And its meaning is variously given as 'to add newly fermenting wort...' or 'fermenting wort' (merriam webster)..

And from German..'to add herbs to brewing beer.... from '...to curl back from the edge..'

All a bit spurious and iffy.

AND we appear to have a perfectly good english word; Barm. (for any northerners, as in barm cake - bread made from yeast used in brewing)

from same dictionary; 'yeast formed on fermenting malt liquors'. Use 'from before the 12th century'. from middle english 'berme', from old english 'beorma',

So why dont we use a perfectly good, nice sounding, old historic english word instead of some ugly foreign nonsense?

Its barm not krausen - just like it's a motorway not an autobahn
 

Dutto

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what do u mean exactly opening the bottles at 3 and 7 days?
If you open a bottle at 3 days you should get a mild “Phtt” of pressure. This should increase by 7 days IF you haven’t bottled or kegged it too early.

If you bottled/kegged the brew too early and have secondary fermentation then at day 3 it could be a “gusher” (ditto day 7) and you will have a chance to avoid “bottle bombs”!

Enjoy.
:hat:
 

Dutto

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…….

So why dont we use a perfectly good, nice sounding, old historic english word instead of some ugly foreign nonsense?

Its barm not krausen - just like it's a motorway not an autobahn

Er … could it be that most of the population live closer to Europe than they do to “oop north”?

The word “Barm” is as alien to me as “Krausen” and I was born and raised a Tup!
:hat:
 

KGB

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We all seem to use Krausen for the stuff on the top of the fermenter.

Why?

Its always struck me as a horrible, strange word. And its meaning is variously given as 'to add newly fermenting wort...' or 'fermenting wort' (merriam webster)..

And from German..'to add herbs to brewing beer.... from '...to curl back from the edge..'

All a bit spurious and iffy.

AND we appear to have a perfectly good english word; Barm. (for any northerners, as in barm cake - bread made from yeast used in brewing)

from same dictionary; 'yeast formed on fermenting malt liquors'. Use 'from before the 12th century'. from middle english 'berme', from old english 'beorma',

So why dont we use a perfectly good, nice sounding, old historic english word instead of some ugly foreign nonsense?

Its barm not krausen - just like it's a motorway not an autobahn

i love the sound of the word 'krausen' and i certainly wouldn't describe it as "ugly foreign nonsense". that seems decidedly jingoistic to me.

besides that, however, you make a compelling argument. as i generally brew english-style ales rather than the beers of the mainland (and am located up north) i shall trial using 'barm'.
 
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i love the sound of the word 'krausen' and i certainly wouldn't describe it as "ugly foreign nonsense". that seems decidedly jingoistic to me.

besides that, however, you make a compelling argument. as i generally brew english-style ales rather than the beers of the mainland (and am located up north) i shall trial using 'barm'.
It will taste much better!
 

An Ankoù

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We all seem to use Krausen for the stuff on the top of the fermenter.

Why?

Its always struck me as a horrible, strange word. And its meaning is variously given as 'to add newly fermenting wort...' or 'fermenting wort' (merriam webster)..

And from German..'to add herbs to brewing beer.... from '...to curl back from the edge..'

All a bit spurious and iffy.

AND we appear to have a perfectly good english word; Barm. (for any northerners, as in barm cake - bread made from yeast used in brewing)

from same dictionary; 'yeast formed on fermenting malt liquors'. Use 'from before the 12th century'. from middle english 'berme', from old english 'beorma',

So why dont we use a perfectly good, nice sounding, old historic english word instead of some ugly foreign nonsense?

Its barm not krausen - just like it's a motorway not an autobahn
I agree with you 100%, Obadiah. I understand the barm forms a rocky head and that someone who is barmy has either had too much beer or is suffering from the effects of poor ventilation where the beer's being made. Let's get rid of pretentious words like vorlauf, too, and talk about recirculating our beer. And why do we need to lauter when a good old draining and/or sparging will do.
Good cases of bullshi'ite baffles brains in my opinion.

You could equally well ask why An Ankoù instead of good old Grim Reaper? It's because she's female in French.
 
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I agree with you 100%, Obadiah. I understand the barm forms a rocky head and that someone who is barmy has either had too much beer or is suffering from the effects of poor ventilation where the beer's being made. Let's get rid of pretentious words like vorlauf, too, and talk about recirculating our beer. And why do we need to lauter when a good old draining and/or sparging will do.
Good cases of bullshi'ite baffles brains in my opinion. clapa

You could equally well ask why An Ankoù instead of good old Grim Reaper? It's because she's female in French.
And what on earth is a Boondoggle?
 

An Ankoù

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And what on earth is a Boondoggle?
It's a Ringwood Beer.
A relatively new one although it may run into decades by now. I used to drink it in the Porterhouse in Westbourne. Not a bad drop.
1653661344561.png
 

An Ankoù

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We were forced by Brussels to use these German words in brewing. Since we left the EU along with the blue passport the use of English terms is the greatest benefit.😉
Does that mean we can have proper English beer again, too? Like Watney's Red Barrel, Trophy and (the one we've all missed more than all the others put together) Lager and Lime.
Oh, and served in a glass with a crown on it instead of CE or whatever it was?
 

Dutto

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We were forced by Brussels to use these German words in brewing. Since we left the EU along with the blue passport the use of English terms is the greatest benefit.😉
Oh dear! Another brain washed victim of the Daily Wail!

We were always allowed to use ANY colour of Passport but OUR Government chose to use the red one ‘cos it was cheaper!
:hat:
 

An Ankoù

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Oh dear! Another brain washed victim of the Daily Wail!

We were always allowed to use ANY colour of Passport but OUR Government chose to use the red one ‘cos it was cheaper!
:hat:
I think CCs having a laugh, Dutto. But am I mistaken in thinking that a lot of our proper, imperial, best in the world, British stuff, including stamps and, I think, passports were printed by a Co called De La Rue. Good English name that. Came over with the saxons and its where we got Ruel Brittania from.
:coat:
 

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