Kwik clear finings

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Alan L

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Hi All,

I've started using Kwik clear finings for my beer. I couldn't find any great details of anyone using it on the forum and the instructions on the box are vague.

So I thought I'd share my method in case anyone else has had the same issue.

I used 5ml of solution A, mixed it into the fermenter, waited for 30 mins, added 5ml of solution B, then left it overnight.

I leave my brew in the fermenter for a minimum of three weeks before adding finings.
The bottles take about one/two months to condition, but taste excellent with no smell or taste of yeast at all.

I've used this for my last 4 batches (all were cooper kits) and it's worked great. So much cheaper than buying separate finings for each batch too!

Cheers
Alan
 

Brewberoza

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What is the active ingredient?

Do you see coagulated particles afterwards in the bottom of your FV?

Also, some of us like a little yeast in our beers:wha:
 

dave0w

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yep so al be trying this as i have a load of kwik for wine and am always looking for a way to make things better, ever if it no better as to be worth a try
 

baggybill

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I'll be trying this too, on a beer for the first time. Does a great job on my wine and I have it to hand.

My Wilkos stout has a bit of a yeast smell/taste off it and not something I want to repeat. Bottle time is not helping.

If I lose a bit of flavour or colour, so be it... I think I may be suffering from sediment/yeast OCD :roll:
 

Alan L

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The ingredients are: kieselsol, gelatine, citric acid and a preservative (e202).

I don't mind the taste of yeast, but the smell around the screw caps is horrible (a reason why I use glass bottles now).

There's no coagulated or floating particles. Just the usual sugary paste at the bottom of the fv.

I wouldn't say there's any loss of taste or colour either. As it takes so long to condition, I'm probably using too much. Might try 3 or 4ml in the next batch.

Cheers
 

pluckthechicken

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Got some of this from my LHBS yesterday at the guy's recommendation.
Apparently the kieselsol picks up all the charged particles in the beer (part A) and then the gelatine clumps those particles together so they settle out faster (part B). Glad to see it's working for others.
 

krispn

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Bit of a zombie thread but I just nabbed some of this stuff today for use in a stout which is just about ready to keg and for an IPA I’ve brewed today for when it’s ready just as soon as the kviek does it’s thing.

My plan is to let the stout sit in the FV for another 48 hours now I have added parts A and B as directed on the packaging. Here’s my question...

Do I need to chill the stout as in a traditional cold crash getting it down to approx 5c or will the gelatin naturally ‘sink’ without the need for the cold crash. I’m happy to take the temp down if that aides the fallout of particular just needing a heads up firm folks who have some experience with this particular product.

Any help always appreciated!
 

foxbat

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You don't need to drop the temperature for kwik clear to work, but it will work faster if you do. Example: my last IPA was fined in the keg at 12C (serving temperature) and was commercial-clear in a week, though a thorough fermentation with a flocculant yeast did mean it was nearly clear going in.

Neither of the beers your proposing are normally served at a temperature where chill haze is an issue so don't worry about that.

[Edit] come to think of it the stout may be better off not chilled. At 5C you'll bring out more of the proteins that contribute to the desirable, thick mouthfeel that a stout ought to have.
 
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krispn

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You don't need to drop the temperature for kwik clear to work, but it will work faster if you do. Example: my last IPA was fined in the keg at 12C (serving temperature) and was commercial-clear in a week, though a thorough fermentation with a flocculant yeast did mean it was nearly clear going in.

Neither of the beers your proposing are normally served at a temperature where chill haze is an issue so don't worry about that.

[Edit] come to think of it the stout may be better off not chilled. At 5C you'll bring out more of the proteins that contribute to the desirable, thick mouthfeel that a stout ought to have.
Cheers
I normally follow the processes in the BYO article to minimise haze but thought I'd try this Kwik Clear as it's not something I've used before and I may do a lager over the colder months. It just kinda made sense to me to chill the beer as per a cold crash before transfer to the keg.

I'll have a look at it tomorrow and see what's happening before chilling and kegging.
Thanks
 
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